Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsShasta Lake
IN THE NEWS

Shasta Lake

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
Hundreds of vacationers and residents were evacuated by boat and car Wednesday as a wildfire swept through parched forests in Northern California's Jones Valley, destroying a Shasta Lake marina. Triple-digit temperatures and low humidity fueled the fire, which spread to 1,000 acres by 11 p.m., according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. The blaze, which began about 3:25 p.m.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 31, 2013 | By Ken Schwencke
A shallow magnitude 3.0 earthquake was reported Saturday morning near Palo Cedro, Calif., according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The temblor occurred at 2:15 a.m. Pacific time at a depth of 11.2 miles. According to the USGS, the epicenter was eight miles from Redding, 11 miles from Shasta Lake,  25 miles from Red Bluff and 140 miles from Sacramento. In the past 10 days, there have been no earthquakes magnitude 3.0 and greater centered nearby. This information comes from the USGS Earthquake Notification Service and this post was created by an algorithm written by the author.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
October 23, 1994 | JOHN McKINNEY
Mention Mt. Shasta or Shasta-Trinity National Forest to experienced hikers and watch their excitement become almost palpable as they rave about the great mountain or the vast forest. Mention Shasta Lake and these same hikers are likely to mutter: "Hike where?" California's largest reservoir offers some intriguing shoreline trails that explore surprisingly remote terrain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
With the statewide snowpack at only 52% of the norm for this time of year, state and federal water managers are expecting below-normal spring runoff and falling reservoir levels. The last three months in California have been the driest of any January-through-March period on record, going back to 1895. It has been a winter of extremes in the state, beginning with an unusually wet November and December and ending with a string of parched months. "It's like Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde -- the changes we've had," said climatologist Kelly Redmond of the Western Regional Climate Center.
NEWS
July 22, 1991 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern Pacific officials claimed their first success Sunday in cleaning toxic pesticides from Shasta Lake using an experimental system they said has "trapped" the poison in a narrow bay and is slowly removing it from the water. The Department of Fish and Game also announced that levels of the chemical are now so low in the Sacramento River that test trout placed in the river in cages survived overnight.
NEWS
July 31, 1991 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State authorities gave Shasta Lake a clean bill of health Tuesday and announced that the northernmost arm of the reservoir--contaminated and closed to the public when pesticide spilled into it from a derailed train car--will be reopened to recreation on Thursday. A ban on fishing in an area stretching from a small island in the lake up to the site of the July 14 chemical spill will remain in effect, however, until an assessment is completed of the ecological damage caused by the disaster.
SPORTS
August 4, 1986 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
Its waters come tumbling down from three mountain ranges in tens of thousands of rivulets that in turn become thousands of creeks. Eventually, the creeks become three major rivers, which ultimately become Shasta Lake. In the 1940s, a massive dam arose in the path of the Sacramento River, in a canyon 12 miles north of Redding. When Shasta Lake filled, around 1944, it became the largest reservoir entirely within California and the major element in the state's vast Central Valley Water Project.
TRAVEL
December 10, 1989
We were asleep on the houseboat when it tore loose from its spiked mooring on a mudbank in a pitch-black night. The rain pelted its decks and walls and slid off in huge sheets into Northern California's Shasta Lake, about 20 miles north of here. The rain orchestrated its own splat-plop melody, with the huge drops playing to an audience of five of us asleep in various compartments between the thin-paneled wooden walls.
NEWS
March 24, 1993 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since heavy winter storms in 1986, water has begun flowing over spillways at the state's two most important dams, providing dramatic confirmation that California's six-year drought has ended. State officials began releasing water Tuesday into the Feather River from Oroville Dam, the nation's highest, in anticipation of another storm in Northern California and the continued melting of the Sierra Nevada snowpack.
NEWS
July 20, 1991 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Southern Pacific announced plans Friday to clean up the plume of toxic pesticide in Shasta Lake by vaporizing the chemical, but state officials quickly stepped in and blocked the operation because of health concerns. The railroad company was preparing to place pipes under the half-mile-long spill and bubble the chemical to the surface when the new California Environmental Protection Agency brought the plan to a halt, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2009 | Christopher Goffard
Tyler R. Walshe joined the Army to make his parents proud, fight America's enemies and make a career in the military. After he arrived in Afghanistan on his first combat tour in July -- weeks after he turned 21 -- he told his wife that he had discovered a new reason for fighting. "You realize you're fighting for the guys next to you, so you can all come home," his 20-year-old wife, Kirsten, recalled him saying. "We talked about that a lot of times." On Aug. 31, just weeks into his first tour, the Army specialist from the Northern California community of Shasta Lake was killed when a roadside bomb exploded near him in southern Afghanistan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2007 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
John F. Reginato, an early and enduring promoter of Northern California tourism who helped introduce house boating to the West by suggesting more than half a century ago that "campers with pontoons" would make Shasta Lake prosper, has died. He was 89. Reginato died July 28 at a hospice in Tacoma, Wash., after a series of strokes and heart attacks, said his son, John. Reginato had lived in Redding from 1949 until moving to Gig Harbor, Wash., last year to be near his son.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2004 | Gabrielle Banks and Eric Malnic, Times Staff Writers
This community, which lost dozens of homes in a wildfire last week, is a collection of mobile homes, trailers and manufactured homes scattered along a dusty, brush-choked canyon about three miles south of Shasta Lake. You wouldn't confuse Jones Valley with the upscale resorts at the lake, where vacationers rent luxury houseboats for up to $2,000 a week. The several hundred residents don't have that kind money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2004 | Gabrielle Banks and Eric Malnic, Times Staff Writers
A wildfire started by a lawnmower burned at least 67 homes on the south shore of Shasta Lake and raged out of control Thursday, charring more than 7,500 acres and forcing the evacuation of more than 400 residents. "It just kind of goes forever and ever and ever," said Ron Smith, an assistant chief with the Bella Vista Fire Department. "There are red spires in the center and in the front a wall of fire, maybe a mile wide."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
Hundreds of vacationers and residents were evacuated by boat and car Wednesday as a wildfire swept through parched forests in Northern California's Jones Valley, destroying a Shasta Lake marina. Triple-digit temperatures and low humidity fueled the fire, which spread to 1,000 acres by 11 p.m., according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. The blaze, which began about 3:25 p.m.
TRAVEL
October 23, 1994 | JOHN McKINNEY
Mention Mt. Shasta or Shasta-Trinity National Forest to experienced hikers and watch their excitement become almost palpable as they rave about the great mountain or the vast forest. Mention Shasta Lake and these same hikers are likely to mutter: "Hike where?" California's largest reservoir offers some intriguing shoreline trails that explore surprisingly remote terrain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2004 | Gabrielle Banks and Eric Malnic, Times Staff Writers
A wildfire started by a lawnmower burned at least 67 homes on the south shore of Shasta Lake and raged out of control Thursday, charring more than 7,500 acres and forcing the evacuation of more than 400 residents. "It just kind of goes forever and ever and ever," said Ron Smith, an assistant chief with the Bella Vista Fire Department. "There are red spires in the center and in the front a wall of fire, maybe a mile wide."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2009 | Christopher Goffard
Tyler R. Walshe joined the Army to make his parents proud, fight America's enemies and make a career in the military. After he arrived in Afghanistan on his first combat tour in July -- weeks after he turned 21 -- he told his wife that he had discovered a new reason for fighting. "You realize you're fighting for the guys next to you, so you can all come home," his 20-year-old wife, Kirsten, recalled him saying. "We talked about that a lot of times." On Aug. 31, just weeks into his first tour, the Army specialist from the Northern California community of Shasta Lake was killed when a roadside bomb exploded near him in southern Afghanistan.
NEWS
March 24, 1993 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since heavy winter storms in 1986, water has begun flowing over spillways at the state's two most important dams, providing dramatic confirmation that California's six-year drought has ended. State officials began releasing water Tuesday into the Feather River from Oroville Dam, the nation's highest, in anticipation of another storm in Northern California and the continued melting of the Sierra Nevada snowpack.
NEWS
July 31, 1991 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State authorities gave Shasta Lake a clean bill of health Tuesday and announced that the northernmost arm of the reservoir--contaminated and closed to the public when pesticide spilled into it from a derailed train car--will be reopened to recreation on Thursday. A ban on fishing in an area stretching from a small island in the lake up to the site of the July 14 chemical spill will remain in effect, however, until an assessment is completed of the ecological damage caused by the disaster.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|