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Shatt Al Arab

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NEWS
March 28, 1986
Iraq said its warplanes destroyed a 16-vessel Iranian military convoy. Iraqi communiques said seven Iranian cargo vessels and nine escorting gunboats were spotted heading toward the entrance to the Shatt al Arab waterway that forms the southern border between the two countries. Iraqi planes attacked, destroying the vessels "one after another, and sinking them in an air epic," Baghdad radio said.
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WORLD
June 3, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Four U.S. soldiers and five civilians in two boats were taken captive by Iranians, blindfolded and interrogated before being released, the U.S. Central Command said by phone from its Tampa headquarters. Two of the civilians were still being held. Four soldiers from the Army's 1092nd Engineer Battalion, a civilian Army contractor, two civilian captains and two boat drivers were sailing up the Shatt al Arab waterway to pick up Iraqi South Oil Co. personnel when they were taken prisoner, Cmdr.
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NEWS
August 19, 1988 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Along its 115-mile length, the Shatt al Arab waterway seems like a dead river. On its swift passage to the Persian Gulf, with Iran to the east and Iraq to its west, the confluence of the mighty Tigris and Euphrates rivers is the color of mud, the result of not having been dredged for eight years. As it heads for the sea, it passes wrecked cities--Khorramshahr and Abadan in Iran and Al Faw in Iraq--which have been laid waste by the conflict between Tehran and Baghdad.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | SALAH NASRAWI, Associated Press
The government of Iraq is spending $6 billion to rebuild this city at almost head-spinning speed, turning a town left virtually demolished by the war with Iran into "Iraq's most beautiful and elegant city." Workers have built bridges, replaced buildings, fixed roads, added new water and electricity systems and have even begun replacing palm trees decapitated by artillery fire. Officials plan to erect nearly 100 statues of war heroes, with their fingers pointing forbiddingly in the direction of neighboring Iran.
NEWS
October 18, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Iran announced Monday that it has agreed to clear the disputed Shatt al Arab waterway, blocked by mines and sunken ships, in a concession aimed at breaking deadlocked peace negotiations with Iraq. But the concession does not mean that Iran now recognizes Iraqi sovereignty over the strategic waterway, diplomatic and other sources said.
NEWS
January 11, 1987 | Associated Press
Iran thrust across the Shatt al-Arab waterway into Iraq on Friday for the second time in two weeks, but Iraq said it pushed the invaders back and killed thousands. The Iranians said their troops seized a beachhead and continued to hold positions on the Iraqi side of the Shatt al-Arab, a fast-flowing channel that forms the southern border. An Iraqi attack across the Shatt in September, 1980, began the war.
NEWS
October 18, 1988 | From the Washington Post
Iran announced Monday that it will accept Iraq's demand to begin joint dredging operations in the strategic Shatt al Arab waterway as part of the disputed cease-fire agreement between the two belligerents. But Iran still insists that a 1975 accord setting the border between the two countries down the middle of the waterway must remain in effect. Iraq has demanded full control over the Shatt al Arab before signing a comprehensive peace agreement.
WORLD
June 3, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Four U.S. soldiers and five civilians in two boats were taken captive by Iranians, blindfolded and interrogated before being released, the U.S. Central Command said by phone from its Tampa headquarters. Two of the civilians were still being held. Four soldiers from the Army's 1092nd Engineer Battalion, a civilian Army contractor, two civilian captains and two boat drivers were sailing up the Shatt al Arab waterway to pick up Iraqi South Oil Co. personnel when they were taken prisoner, Cmdr.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | SALAH NASRAWI, Associated Press
The government of Iraq is spending $6 billion to rebuild this city at almost head-spinning speed, turning a town left virtually demolished by the war with Iran into "Iraq's most beautiful and elegant city." Workers have built bridges, replaced buildings, fixed roads, added new water and electricity systems and have even begun replacing palm trees decapitated by artillery fire. Officials plan to erect nearly 100 statues of war heroes, with their fingers pointing forbiddingly in the direction of neighboring Iran.
NEWS
December 28, 1988
Mines laid by Iran and Iraq are believed to be still adrift in the Persian Gulf, where shipping has increased after the August cease-fire, a U.S. Navy officer said. Lt. Cmdr. John K. Ross, skipper of the minesweeper Fearless, said the Shatt al Arab waterway that forms the southern boundary between the two countries is considered particularly risky. "I hope they're all gone, but I believe more mines are still here in the gulf," he said.
NEWS
October 18, 1988 | From the Washington Post
Iran announced Monday that it will accept Iraq's demand to begin joint dredging operations in the strategic Shatt al Arab waterway as part of the disputed cease-fire agreement between the two belligerents. But Iran still insists that a 1975 accord setting the border between the two countries down the middle of the waterway must remain in effect. Iraq has demanded full control over the Shatt al Arab before signing a comprehensive peace agreement.
NEWS
October 18, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Iran announced Monday that it has agreed to clear the disputed Shatt al Arab waterway, blocked by mines and sunken ships, in a concession aimed at breaking deadlocked peace negotiations with Iraq. But the concession does not mean that Iran now recognizes Iraqi sovereignty over the strategic waterway, diplomatic and other sources said.
NEWS
October 9, 1988 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Iran announced Saturday that it has reached agreement with Iraq to break a deadlock in their continuing efforts to reach a permanent peace agreement in the Persian Gulf War. Returning from talks at the United Nations in New York, Iranian Foreign Minister Ali Akbar Velayati said that the progress is based on a compromise proposed by U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar, who is mediating the negotiations. "The U.N.
NEWS
August 19, 1988 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Along its 115-mile length, the Shatt al Arab waterway seems like a dead river. On its swift passage to the Persian Gulf, with Iran to the east and Iraq to its west, the confluence of the mighty Tigris and Euphrates rivers is the color of mud, the result of not having been dredged for eight years. As it heads for the sea, it passes wrecked cities--Khorramshahr and Abadan in Iran and Al Faw in Iraq--which have been laid waste by the conflict between Tehran and Baghdad.
OPINION
July 31, 1988 | G.H. Jansen, G.H. Jansen, the author of "Militant Islam," has covered the Middle East for many years
Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini's unconditional acceptance of U.N. Resolution 598, which amounts to unconditional surrender, calls into question the basic concept of the Islamic state. Iran's humiliating failure has discredited Khomeini's velayat-e-faqih, the rule of the theologians. Thus the Sunni Muslim abhorrence of any priestly caste, of ayatollahs and hojatoleslams, has been both justified and strengthened.
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