Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsShaun Ryder
IN THE NEWS

Shaun Ryder

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1991 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For a guy hardly short on words and opinions, Shaun Ryder sure wants others to pipe down. The lead singer for the Manchester rock standard-bearers Happy Mondays is proud of the music that's coming out of England now, including other Manchester bands and Jesus Jones and EMF. And as the band starts its second major U.S. tour, which comes to the Ventura Theatre on Tuesday and the Hollywood Palladium on Thursday, he's proud to be associated with those other acts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1991 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For a guy hardly short on words and opinions, Shaun Ryder sure wants others to pipe down. The lead singer for the Manchester rock standard-bearers Happy Mondays is proud of the music that's coming out of England now, including other Manchester bands and Jesus Jones and EMF. And as the band starts its second major U.S. tour, which comes to the Ventura Theatre on Tuesday and the Hollywood Palladium on Thursday, he's proud to be associated with those other acts.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1995 | SANDY MASUO
** Black Grape, "It's Great When You're Straight . . . Yeah," Radioactive/MCA. After a 2 1/2-year hiatus, former Happy Mondays leader Shaun Ryder is back with Black Grape, which generates a similar blend of contemporary dance grooves, vintage funk and trippy psychedelic overtones.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1992 | Steve Hochman and Dennis Hunt
After nearly destroying many of rock's most creative figures in the '60s, heroin generally went out of style in the '70s and early '80s. But an alarming number of today's alternative and hard-rock musicians have acknowledged using the narcotic in recent years. They range from Guns N' Roses guitarist Slash and Red Hot Chili Peppers lead singer Anthony Kiedis to Ministry mastermind Al Jourgensen and rock's newest parents, Nirvana's Kurt Cobain and Hole's Courtney Love.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1990 | JONATHAN GOLD
In this country, the craze for Manchester's current Summer of Love is still kind of theoretical. You're more likely to read an article about a Manchester band than hear one on the radio; more likely to know about the fashion--bell-bottoms!--than about the sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2007 | Chris Lee, Times Staff Writer
ON the one hand you have a casual, deplorable attempt at Ebonics that cost a vaunted talk-show host his career and has made a nation of cable subscribers and radio listeners search its collective soul. On the other, you have a trash-talking rap group actively courting controversy with a race-baiting song called "White Girl" -- with lyrics that could easily be misconstrued as promoting sexual enslavement. It's been greeted with a "So what?"
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It would be so simple if that noted philosopher, T. Lasorda, was correct when he observed that life is simply a case of mind over matter--"If you don't mind, it don't matter." But everybody, particularly sports fans, does mind. It does matter, because for every winner, there's a loser. And what if your team loses all the time?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1991 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Maybe everybody involved should think of the Happy Mondays concert at the Ventura Theatre as Disappointing Tuesday. Shaun Ryder and the rest of the highly touted British rock band must have felt right at home when they arrived at the theater late Tuesday for a sound check. It was the kind of dark, rainy afternoon that might be rare in Southern California, but which is common back in Manchester, where the Mondays are the co-leaders with the Stone Roses of a hugely promising dance-rock scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1996 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shaun Ryder heard the stories. He remembers reading in the British music press that his career was over now that his band the Happy Mondays had finally self-destructed beneath an avalanche of drugs, booze and other excesses. But Ryder never said a word, never granted an interview after the Mondays' 1993 breakup, nor felt the need to contradict his reputation as an aging wild man.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|