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Shauna Garr

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1988 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
At first, 15-year-old Alirio Romero seemed tense as he rehearsed the questions he would ask high school junior Reyna Castro when the cameras began to roll. "So tell me about the first day of school at Westlake," he said, staring at the ceiling of the Castro family's East Los Angeles apartment as if he might find the words written there. "So I hear you're a good athlete. A good ath-lete . . . Couldn't I just say sports?" he finally asked in exasperation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1988 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
At first, 15-year-old Alirio Romero seemed tense as he rehearsed the questions he would ask high school junior Reyna Castro when the cameras began to roll. "So tell me about the first day of school at Westlake," he said, staring at the ceiling of the Castro family's East Los Angeles apartment as if he might find the words written there. "So I hear you're a good athlete. A good ath-lete . . . Couldn't I just say sports?" he finally asked in exasperation.
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NEWS
August 2, 1990 | BETTY GOODWIN
About 100 young (as in under 30) entertainment industry executives, agents, writers and musicians mingled Sunday afternoon in the atrium of the Creative Artists Agency building in Beverly Hills. They listened to the music of Eric Gale and showed their support for the Right Channel, a nonprofit organization that produces educational videos by and about inner-city Los Angeles teen-agers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"How High" generates considerable hilarity when it turns loose rappers Method Man and Redman on an unsuspecting Harvard University. The way they get there is pretty funny in this raunchy, good-natured comedy from Universal. Written by Dustin Lee Abraham and directed by Jesse Dylan, it features a fine mix of several generations of comic talent plus a terrific soundtrack from its stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1994 | Howard Rosenberg
"Teens talk straight about drugs, crime and killing on the next 'Donahue!' " bellowed the talk-show promo, a reminder of one reason why adolescents watch so little television compared with most other age groups. Rarely do they recognize themselves on TV. That bad situation would worsen still without ABC's "My So-Called Life," this season's TV headquarters for teen Angst .
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