Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsShaw Industries Inc
IN THE NEWS

Shaw Industries Inc

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
September 7, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Berkshire Hathaway Inc., the investment firm headed by billionaire Warren Buffett, has offered to buy Shaw Industries Inc., the world's largest carpet maker, for about $2 billion, or $19 a share, in cash. The news sent Shaw's shares up $6.44, or 53%, to $18.63 on the New York Stock Exchange. Berkshire's Class A shares dropped $1,250 to $58,000 and its Class B shares fell $35 to $1,910, also on the NYSE.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 7, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Berkshire Hathaway Inc., the investment firm headed by billionaire Warren Buffett, has offered to buy Shaw Industries Inc., the world's largest carpet maker, for about $2 billion, or $19 a share, in cash. The news sent Shaw's shares up $6.44, or 53%, to $18.63 on the New York Stock Exchange. Berkshire's Class A shares dropped $1,250 to $58,000 and its Class B shares fell $35 to $1,910, also on the NYSE.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
January 22, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Billionaire investor Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway Inc. agreed to acquire the 13% of carpet maker Shaw Industries Inc. it doesn't already own for about $354.6 million in stock. The stake is held by a group that includes Shaw Chief Executive Robert Shaw and President Julian Saul, Omaha-based Berkshire said. Buffett's investment company agreed to buy its 87% stake in the largest maker of tufted broadloom carpet in September 2000 for $2.07 billion in cash. Shaw is based in Dalton, Ga.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mohawk Carpets to Acquire Aladdin Mills Inc.: The nation's second-largest carpet maker will take over privately held Aladdin in a stock-swap valued at about $422 million. The combined company, with about $1.3 billion in annual sales, would still be a distant second to industry leader Shaw Industries Inc., which has about $2.4 billion in sales, or 30% of the U.S. carpet market. Atlanta-based Mohawk Industries Inc. and Dalton, Ga.-based Aladdin have little overlap.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Warren Buffett continues to look to the building-materials business for bargains. Shares of USG Corp. (ticker symbol: USG) soared almost 30% on Monday after Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway Inc. reported holding a 14.98% stake in the biggest U.S. maker of wallboard. Chicago-based USG's shares jumped $4.44 to $19.38 after Berkshire disclosed its investment of 6.5 million shares in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2000 | ROBIN SIDEL, REUTERS
Johns Manville Corp., the building products maker that has been searching for a buyer for nearly two years, said Wednesday it would be acquired by Berkshire Hathaway Inc. for $1.92 billion. The deal comes less than two weeks after Johns Manville canceled a $2.3-billion takeover by buyout firm Hicks, Muse, Tate & Furst Inc. and Bear Stearns Cos.' merchant banking unit. The companies mutually agreed to abandon that deal, which valued Johns Manville at $15.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1995 | MARC RICE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In northwest Georgia, where most of the nation's carpet is made, there are tons of scrap, lint and other residue that just can't be swept under the rug. Most of it ends up in the Dalton-Whitfield County landfill, where piles of carpet waste stand two stories above ground level.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2005 | From Associated Press
Here in the "Carpet Capital of the World," the large manufacturing plants that supply almost half the nation's carpet also pump out reams of wasted scraps that eventually wind up in landfills. Next month, the world's largest carpet maker will do something about the problem when it begins operating a one-of-a-kind power plant that will be fueled by the 16,000 tons of overruns, rejects and remnants it turns out every year. Shaw Industries Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2008 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
To a chemist, chlorine is the perfect compound. Easily combining with other elements and molecules, chlorine is transformed into new classes of chemicals with an endless array of uses. It disinfects water, cleans clothes, kills bugs, degreases metals, bleaches paper. It has long been vital to the synthesis of plastics, drugs, microchips and many other products around the globe. But to environmental scientists, chlorine is a perfect nightmare. Fumes seeping from a tanker could kill thousands.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|