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Shaw Pittman Potts Trowbridge

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NEWS
February 15, 1989 | From the Washington Post
Former Transportation Secretary James H. Burnley IV was actively negotiating to join a prominent Washington law firm at the same time he issued an important ruling in favor of Eastern Airlines, one of the firm's major clients in the transportation field. In December, Burnley took the unusual step of personally handling a request by the Air Line Pilots Assn. that the department launch an investigation into Eastern's "continuing fitness" as a carrier in view of its continuing financial troubles.
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BUSINESS
August 16, 1991 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unusual lawsuit that touches on issues ranging from legal ethics to nuclear power plant safety, Westinghouse Electric has sued three law firms, charging them with "purloining" confidential documents and using them to stir up other lawsuits against Westinghouse.
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BUSINESS
August 16, 1991 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unusual lawsuit that touches on issues ranging from legal ethics to nuclear power plant safety, Westinghouse Electric has sued three law firms, charging them with "purloining" confidential documents and using them to stir up other lawsuits against Westinghouse.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | From the Washington Post
Former Transportation Secretary James H. Burnley IV was actively negotiating to join a prominent Washington law firm at the same time he issued an important ruling in favor of Eastern Airlines, one of the firm's major clients in the transportation field. In December, Burnley took the unusual step of personally handling a request by the Air Line Pilots Assn. that the department launch an investigation into Eastern's "continuing fitness" as a carrier in view of its continuing financial troubles.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Court Dismisses Suit Against Law Firms: Westinghouse, facing a dozen suits over alleged defects in nuclear plant steam generators, had contended that three law firms used stolen documents to instigate the suits. The firms are Los Angeles-based Chase, Rotchford, Drukker & Bogust plus Newman & Holtzinger of Washington and Shaw, Pittman, Potts & Trowbridge of Washington.
NEWS
February 16, 1989
Former Transportation Secretary James H. Burnley IV received clearance from the department's ethics officer to review a request to investigate Eastern Airlines while he was negotiating to join a Washington law firm that represents Eastern, according to documents released by the department. The documents indicate that on Dec. 13 Burnley received a one-sentence memorandum from Rosalind A.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William P. Barr, President Bush's nominee to become attorney general, was encouraged by his Depression-era mother to attend night law school while working at the CIA because she thought it would enhance his job security. Barr decided to heed his mother's advice, figuring a law degree would put "another arrow in his quiver" that might help him advance at the intelligence agency, his first love.
NATIONAL
May 28, 2009 | James Oliphant and Andrew Zajac
The early White House story line on Sonia Sotomayor emphasizes her pragmatism and a cautious, measured approach to the law developed over a years-long climb from exceedingly modest circumstances to becoming the first Latino nominee to the Supreme Court. But an incident in the fall of 1978 illustrates another side of Sotomayor. Then a daring and assertive Yale University law student, she took a stand against a white-shoe Washington law firm that could have jeopardized her career.
SPORTS
August 3, 1997 | SHARON WALSH, WASHINGTON POST
The last will and testament of Washington Redskins owner Jack Kent Cooke--with its eight codicils, seven executors and three different instructions about what his son and widow would get from the estate--is a messy document that could make it difficult for Cooke's family to maintain control of the football team, according to lawyers who have studied it.
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