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Shaw Tehrani

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BUSINESS
May 20, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southland Communications Inc. isn't listed in the phone book. Doing business as National Paging Co., it has about 70 employees and an unassuming headquarters in Santa Ana. After five years of losses and working-capital deficits, Southland is hardly the kind of company that catches the eye of the press or big Wall Street investors. It was, however, the kind of company that drew a network of short sellers, who this spring speculated that Southland's stock price would collapse.
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BUSINESS
May 20, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southland Communications Inc. isn't listed in the phone book. Doing business as National Paging Co., it has about 70 employees and an unassuming headquarters in Santa Ana. After five years of losses and working-capital deficits, Southland is hardly the kind of company that catches the eye of the press or big Wall Street investors. It was, however, the kind of company that drew a network of short sellers, who this spring speculated that Southland's stock price would collapse.
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BUSINESS
October 15, 1994 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what authorities say is the largest stock manipulation case ever uncovered in Los Angeles or Orange counties, the former president of a Santa Ana paging company and three others were indicted Friday on charges of securities fraud, money laundering and conspiracy. Named in the 39-count federal indictment were two Orange County men, Ahmad Naim Bayaa, 41, of Lake Forest, the former president of Southland Communications Inc., and Abdul Deeb, 43, of Anaheim, a former oil consultant.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1997 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County man who turned fugitive for a month after he was convicted of Southern California's largest stock manipulation scheme has been sentenced to seven years, three months in federal prison. Ahmad Naim Bayaa, 44, of Irvine, the principal architect of a $12.5-million scam, was caught in March as he left a Huntington Beach convenience store where he and a cohort allegedly tried to pass counterfeit checks. Charges of forgery and passing counterfeit checks are pending in state court.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a recent filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Southland Communications Inc. said its cash flow is in "extremely critical condition" and it has laid off a quarter of its staff. The filing made June 14 paints a bleak financial picture of the paging-services firm, which is at the center of an SEC civil suit alleging stock manipulation and an FBI criminal investigation.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
FBI agents searched the offices of Southland Communications Inc. on Thursday as part of a criminal wire-fraud investigation related to alleged manipulation of the company's stock. No arrests were made, said Fred Reagan, an FBI spokesman in Los Angeles. He declined to comment on whether agents seized records or questioned employees during the search.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1997 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of two Orange County men convicted in Southern California's largest stock manipulation scheme failed to appear for sentencing and is being sought as a fugitive. Ahmad Naim Bayaa, 43, of Irvine, the principal architect of a $12.5-million scam, disappeared before he was to be sentenced Friday in Los Angeles. U.S. District Judge Richard A. Paez issued a warrant for his arrest.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ahmad N. Bayaa was relishing the spotlight in August, 1988. In a high-profile ceremony at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Laguna Niguel, the then-35-year-old Palestinian businessman was wed by the Rev. Jesse Jackson to a Jewish woman from Yorba Linda. Before 400 guests, Jackson praised the couple for transcending ethnic prejudice, saying, "This marriage is America at its best" because it "represents joy in Laguna, hope in the world."
BUSINESS
January 29, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The former president of a Santa Ana paging company has agreed to pay back $736,935 in stock-trading profits to settle civil charges that he manipulated the company's stock price, the Securities and Exchange Commission said Tuesday. Ahmad Bayaa also agreed to resign as president of Southland Communications Inc., to pay $137,248 in interest fees and to place his 921,000 shares in company stock in a custodial account over which he will have no control, said Daniel R.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1994 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what authorities say is the largest stock manipulation case ever uncovered in Los Angeles or Orange counties, the former president of a Santa Ana paging company and three others were indicted Friday on charges of securities fraud, money-laundering and conspiracy. Named in the 39-count federal indictment were two Orange County men, Ahmad Naim Bayaa, 41, of Lake Forest, former president of Southland Communications Inc., and Abdul Deeb, 43, of Anaheim, a former oil consultant.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1990 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Securities and Exchange Commission says it now knows why the stock of Santa Ana-based Southland Communication Inc. nearly doubled in price a few weeks ago despite the company's dreadful performance: a massive stock market manipulation scheme by the firm's president. The SEC filed a civil lawsuit Monday in federal court in Manhattan, accusing Southland Communication President and Chief Executive Ahmad N.
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