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Shawn Levy

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
When Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson crashed weddings with such crazy success in 2005, they wanted to get laid. Older and not particularly wiser in "The Internship," the guys now want to get jobs. That's funny. Unfortunately, the comedy is linked to some new-age nonsense about old-school guys finally catching up with the Internet age. It's a one-liner forged into a two-hour joke. At stake is a much-coveted summer internship at Google that could lead to a full-time gig. This sets up a fish-out-water tale with the 40-something goofballs essentially thrown into a school ruled by young nerd geniuses.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
When Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson crashed weddings with such crazy success in 2005, they wanted to get laid. Older and not particularly wiser in "The Internship," the guys now want to get jobs. That's funny. Unfortunately, the comedy is linked to some new-age nonsense about old-school guys finally catching up with the Internet age. It's a one-liner forged into a two-hour joke. At stake is a much-coveted summer internship at Google that could lead to a full-time gig. This sets up a fish-out-water tale with the 40-something goofballs essentially thrown into a school ruled by young nerd geniuses.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn and Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson may be the big names in the new comedy "The Internship," but the real star of the film is Google. The company campus in Mountain View, Calif., is the setting for the movie in which Vaughn and Wilson play down-on-their-luck watch salesmen searching for a second chance as Silicon Valley interns. Google lent its brand to the 20th Century Fox movie and let the production film two days on-site without charging location or licensing fees. PHOTOS: Hollywood backlot moments Brainy staffers took on roles as extras (co-founder Sergey Brin appears twice, once wearing green neon slippers and riding an elliptical bike)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn and Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson may be the big names in the new comedy "The Internship," but the real star of the film is Google. The company campus in Mountain View, Calif., is the setting for the movie in which Vaughn and Wilson play down-on-their-luck watch salesmen searching for a second chance as Silicon Valley interns. Google lent its brand to the 20th Century Fox movie and let the production film two days on-site without charging location or licensing fees. PHOTOS: Hollywood backlot moments Brainy staffers took on roles as extras (co-founder Sergey Brin appears twice, once wearing green neon slippers and riding an elliptical bike)
NEWS
June 26, 1996 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"King of Comedy" is not about Richard Pryor, Robin Williams, Steve Martin, Eddie Murphy, Adam Sandler or Jim Carrey, but the author of this superb biography of Jerry Lewis points out that all of them borrowed (or, in some cases, stole outright) from the original Nutty Professor. "Jerry Lewis single-handedly created a style of humor that was half-anarchy, half-excruciation," writes Levy.
NEWS
June 27, 1996 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"King of Comedy" is not about Richard Pryor, Robin Williams, Steve Martin, Eddie Murphy, Adam Sandler or Jim Carrey, but the author of this superb biography of Jerry Lewis points out that all of them borrowed (or, in some cases, stole outright) from the original Nutty Professor. "Jerry Lewis single-handedly created a style of humor that was half-anarchy, half-excruciation," writes Levy.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2010 | By Shawn Levy, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Every one of us working in film comedy today is a descendant of Blake Edwards. Some of us more than others, to be sure, but one way or another, in ways both overt and subliminal, Edwards' films have influenced film comedy ever since. I remember watching his "Pink Panther" films as a kid and reveling in the pure, unabashed silliness of Inspector Clouseau's high jinks. As I grew into adulthood and a career in film comedy, I revisited Edwards' films and was struck not only by the enjoyable-as-ever zaniness but also with a newfound appreciation of the more nuanced elements at work.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2009 | Susan King
After the release of the 2006 blockbuster family comedy "Night at the Museum" about a night watchman (Ben Stiller) who discovers that the exhibits come alive after-hours, director Shawn Levy received "countless" thank-you letters from parents and kids all over the country, and from museum curators who saw an increase in visitors as a result of the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2009 | Rachel Abramowitz
The Washington Mall glistened in the romantic glow of hundreds of old-fashioned street lanterns on a cool May evening. The unusually serene ambience was courtesy of "Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian," which filmed a few days of exteriors in the nation's capital last year before moving on to shoot in Vancouver.
MAGAZINE
August 23, 1992
In "The Fuzziness Factor" (Palm Latitudes, July 19), Shawn Levy stated that William L. Lange brought the buffalo to Urbanus Square when he acquired the lease to the Irvine property during the 1970s. Actually, my father, Dr. Roy E. Shipley, now over 90, brought the first local buffalo to Newport Beach in 1953 from his ranch in Kansas. He called the little theme park the Newport Buffalo Ranch. I remember big cattle trucks bringing the buffalo, unloading the huge bulls with no small effort.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2010 | By Shawn Levy, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Every one of us working in film comedy today is a descendant of Blake Edwards. Some of us more than others, to be sure, but one way or another, in ways both overt and subliminal, Edwards' films have influenced film comedy ever since. I remember watching his "Pink Panther" films as a kid and reveling in the pure, unabashed silliness of Inspector Clouseau's high jinks. As I grew into adulthood and a career in film comedy, I revisited Edwards' films and was struck not only by the enjoyable-as-ever zaniness but also with a newfound appreciation of the more nuanced elements at work.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2009 | Rachel Abramowitz
The Washington Mall glistened in the romantic glow of hundreds of old-fashioned street lanterns on a cool May evening. The unusually serene ambience was courtesy of "Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian," which filmed a few days of exteriors in the nation's capital last year before moving on to shoot in Vancouver.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2009 | Susan King
After the release of the 2006 blockbuster family comedy "Night at the Museum" about a night watchman (Ben Stiller) who discovers that the exhibits come alive after-hours, director Shawn Levy received "countless" thank-you letters from parents and kids all over the country, and from museum curators who saw an increase in visitors as a result of the film.
NEWS
June 27, 1996 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"King of Comedy" is not about Richard Pryor, Robin Williams, Steve Martin, Eddie Murphy, Adam Sandler or Jim Carrey, but the author of this superb biography of Jerry Lewis points out that all of them borrowed (or, in some cases, stole outright) from the original Nutty Professor. "Jerry Lewis single-handedly created a style of humor that was half-anarchy, half-excruciation," writes Levy.
NEWS
June 26, 1996 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"King of Comedy" is not about Richard Pryor, Robin Williams, Steve Martin, Eddie Murphy, Adam Sandler or Jim Carrey, but the author of this superb biography of Jerry Lewis points out that all of them borrowed (or, in some cases, stole outright) from the original Nutty Professor. "Jerry Lewis single-handedly created a style of humor that was half-anarchy, half-excruciation," writes Levy.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
"Just Married" is of interest only as a product of such generic blandness as to be absolutely airtight: not a whiff of originality or real life has been allowed to spoil its plastic perfection. Ashton Kutcher and Brittany Murphy are attractive and skilled performers as the film's newlyweds, but the movie is so mechanical it's like watching Barbie and Ken dolls going through the motions.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2007 | John Horn
One's a white-hot, A-list movie star. The other is Tom Cruise. Ben Stiller and the "Mission: Impossible" veteran may join forces in "Hardy Men," a feature film update of "The Hardy Boys," 20th Century Fox said Tuesday. The film, which is still in development and has neither a screenplay nor a production start date, would be directed by "Night at the Museum's" Shawn Levy. The plot calls for the brothers to end their long estrangement to solve a big case.
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