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Shawn Schepps

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
When Shawn Schepps wants to find something to write about, she makes a list of things that bug her. "I grew up in the '70s," said the actress, "and it bugged me that nobody was talking about it. You heard about the '50s: 'Happy Days,' the '60s: Woodstock, the '40s: Bogart, the '30s: the Depression, the '20s: flappers. But it was like the '70s didn't have a rap--basically because it was a really bad decade."
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
When Shawn Schepps wants to find something to write about, she makes a list of things that bug her. "I grew up in the '70s," said the actress, "and it bugged me that nobody was talking about it. You heard about the '50s: 'Happy Days,' the '60s: Woodstock, the '40s: Bogart, the '30s: the Depression, the '20s: flappers. But it was like the '70s didn't have a rap--basically because it was a really bad decade."
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2002 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Every holiday season needs a pleasant surprise, and this year it's "Drumline." This entertaining and enthusiastically told tale shrewdly energizes its way-familiar plot line by setting it amid one of the greatest and least-known spectacles in American sports. That would be the world of show-style marching bands, which is a football season way of life during halftimes at such predominantly black Southern colleges and universities as Florida A&M and Grambling.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1992 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So many "serious" movies these days are no-brainers that a movie like "Encino Man" (citywide) is almost refreshing. At least it's upfront about being a no-brainer. Is it as enjoyably dopey as "Wayne's World"? Not really. There's nothing here to match the ineffable nerdiness of Mike Myers' Wayne and Dana Carvey's Garth. Those guys are the Cheech and Chong for the cable-TV '90s generation--gee-whiz dudesters who jangle to each other's dorky rhythms.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The pretentious term is the literati . Webster defines it as "the educated class." In a self-spoofing play on words and perceptions, black writer Zora Neale Hurston once described her Harlem Renaissance crowd with an ironic distortion of the word. Now playwright Richard Greenberg has come up with "The Maderati," a tongue-in-cheek lampoon of contemporary white upper-middle-class urban types with artistic pretensions.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1988 | RAY LOYND
No year-end wrap-up can ignore the impact of Del Shores' "Daddy's Dyin' (Who's Got the Will?)." It's the Equity-Waiver success story of the year. "Daddy's Dyin' . . ." is almost a commercial affront to Waiver--the show makes money. The actors have been sharing in the profits every week since the current comedy premiered at Theatre/Theater 10 months ago. Critically, it's also among the 11 superlative productions--of 95--that I reviewed in 1987.
NEWS
January 23, 2003
MUSIC A live score with film on workers' struggles The 1935 film "Redes" cast professional actors and fishermen and the families of the Veracruz village of Alvarado to depict a struggle for social and economic justice. Mexican composer Silvestre Revueltas created the score, which the Los Angeles Philharmonic will play live as the film, released in the U.S. as "The Waves," is screened.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1989 | T.H. MCCULLOH
It's a fascinating conceit of modern playwrights, this bringing together of unlikely cohorts to thresh out philosophical conundrums, and few have carried off the trick better than Terry Johnson in the West Coast premiere of his "Insignificance" at Al's Bar. It's a talky little play, but that's just fine when the talk is lucid and witty, when the intelligence and poetry of the language so well define the pawns in the game and illuminate the author's themes.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1993 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One problem of comedy stardom is that it confers sexiness and power on performers whose humor may rely on stupidity or banality. When that happens, the star comics may lose their edge and craziness and turn into goodwill hucksters. That's what goes wrong with the strenuously silly comedy "Son-in-Law" (citywide), a Pauly Shore vehicle in which MTV's chilled-out, syllable-stretching denizen of "Dudesville" plays a fish out of water: an L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2004 | Michael Cross-Barnet, Times Staff Writer
The brightly painted Yucca Park Community Center, a wild splash of color, stands out against the rest of its drab Hollywood neighborhood. Inside, two tribes sit at opposite ends of a large room. They are worlds apart -- but not for long. On one side, about 40 teenage girls, most from crowded schools in gritty neighborhoods, whisper, stare into space or scribble furiously in purple and beige journals. Fingers nervously flip pencils back and forth.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1987 | RAY LOYND
There's a ripe, sarcastic moment in "The Steven Weed Show" where four young women bewail the disappearance of machismo --guys who drink beer, play pool, who love 'em and dump 'em. They're tired of the warm, sensitive, Alan Alda man of the '70s. Bring back real men. They're not entirely kidding. Caustic irony peppers this late-night dish of a show at Theater/Theater. The target in a consistently funny, stinging, kaleidoscopic chronicle is the self-involved 1970s.
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