Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsShawn Slovo
IN THE NEWS

Shawn Slovo

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 7, 1997 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
It ended, her long pursuit of truth if not justice, in a trading-company office in Johannesburg's warehouse district. Across from her sat one of the former secret police agents who killed her mother. Gillian Slovo is the daughter of Ruth First and Joe Slovo, white leaders in the long clandestine fight against South Africa's apartheid regime. Slovo was chief of staff of the military underground.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 22, 2006 | Lisa Rosen, Special to The Times
HER first screenplay was about her mother; her latest, "Catch a Fire," was suggested by her father. Shawn Slovo's family history is inextricably linked to the modern history of her homeland, South Africa, and her writing gives voice to it. Slovo's parents were lifelong activists in the fight against apartheid. Her mother, Ruth First, was killed in 1982 by a letter bomb sent by members of the South African military. Her father, Joe Slovo, was a leader in the military wing of the African National Congress.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1988 | LEONARD KLADY
Shawn Slovo, author of the autobiographical "A World Apart," has reason to believe its 5-year journey to the screen was worth the struggle. At the conclusion of the Cannes Film Festival on Monday, the British-produced South African drama received the special jury prize and an ensemble acting award for its three principal actresses--Barbara Hershey, Jodhi May and Linda Mvusi. "Cannes was a truly extraordinary experience," she said Tuesday from her London home.
NEWS
May 7, 1997 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
It ended, her long pursuit of truth if not justice, in a trading-company office in Johannesburg's warehouse district. Across from her sat one of the former secret police agents who killed her mother. Gillian Slovo is the daughter of Ruth First and Joe Slovo, white leaders in the long clandestine fight against South Africa's apartheid regime. Slovo was chief of staff of the military underground.
NEWS
November 22, 2006 | Lisa Rosen, Special to The Times
HER first screenplay was about her mother; her latest, "Catch a Fire," was suggested by her father. Shawn Slovo's family history is inextricably linked to the modern history of her homeland, South Africa, and her writing gives voice to it. Slovo's parents were lifelong activists in the fight against apartheid. Her mother, Ruth First, was killed in 1982 by a letter bomb sent by members of the South African military. Her father, Joe Slovo, was a leader in the military wing of the African National Congress.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1988 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
"All this hand-wringing, playing Joan of Arc, is an excuse for being a terrible mother," a South African police interrogator says witheringly to journalist Diana Roth in "A World Apart" (Beverly Center, AMC Century 14), a haunting, deeply moving film of conscience and consequence. Roth (Barbara Hershey) is, in 1963, the first white woman to be jailed under the South African government's Ninety Days Detention Act, the period for which prisoners could be held without charges.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
By the time "Captain Corelli's Mandolin" has sounded its last note, pesky questions leap to mind like pesky fish in a wine-dark sea.
NEWS
September 14, 2006 | Patrick Goldstein, Times Staff Writer
FILMMAKERS are suckers for a true story. It feels like most of the movies I've seen at the Toronto Film Festival this year are based on, inspired by or somehow fueled by a true story. Once you get directors talking, they're always boasting about how much research and reportage they've done on their true-life characters. And then there's Phillip Noyce, the veteran Australian director whose new film, "Catch a Fire," has been one of the marvels of the festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2006 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"CATCH a Fire" sounds like an awfully familiar story, and in some ways it is. Movies on the nightmare that was South Africa under the apartheid system and the heroic efforts made to resist it are hardly new, and it is difficult to avoid a sight-unseen dismissal of this latest example as too familiar and too late. Which would be a mistake. What that analysis doesn't count on, though this story is way more than twice told, is that it has never been told by Derek Luke.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1988 | LEONARD KLADY
Shawn Slovo, author of the autobiographical "A World Apart," has reason to believe its 5-year journey to the screen was worth the struggle. At the conclusion of the Cannes Film Festival on Monday, the British-produced South African drama received the special jury prize and an ensemble acting award for its three principal actresses--Barbara Hershey, Jodhi May and Linda Mvusi. "Cannes was a truly extraordinary experience," she said Tuesday from her London home.
NEWS
January 24, 1993 | N.F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Black people are not black and white people are not white. We're all really different shades of a single protein called melanin," Oprah Winfrey says in the ABC Afterschool Special Shades of a Single Protein. The special focuses on what teen-agers think and feel about race relations. The ABC crew travels across the country to talk to teens.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Although it barely made a ripple at the box office last fall, the drama "Catch a Fire" (Universal, $30) features a strong performance from Derek Luke as Patrick Chamusso. In the early 1980s apartheid South Africa, Chamusso was an apolitical husband and father who had a good job as an oil refinery foreman and was a soccer coach.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|