Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsShayna Gluck
IN THE NEWS

Shayna Gluck

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 8, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five Yugoslav courts have upheld Shayna Gluck Lazarevich's right to custody of her two kidnaped children, but the mounting pile of legal victories is small comfort to the distraught California mother. More than two years after Sasha and Andre Lazarevich were spirited to rural Serbia by their father, they remain hostages in a country indifferent to its own laws and international pressure.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1997 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight years after her ex-husband abducted her children and took them to a country at war, and two years after she won an international legal battle to wrest them back, Shayna Gluck Lazarevich once again lives in fear. She is afraid her ex-husband, a Serbian arms manufacturer now in federal custody in the United States, will soon be freed--perhaps as early as today.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1997 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight years after her ex-husband abducted her children and took them to a country at war, and two years after she won an international legal battle to wrest them back, Shayna Gluck Lazarevich once again lives in fear. She is afraid her ex-husband, a Serbian arms manufacturer now in federal custody in the United States, will soon be freed--perhaps as early as today.
NEWS
February 8, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five Yugoslav courts have upheld Shayna Gluck Lazarevich's right to custody of her two kidnaped children, but the mounting pile of legal victories is small comfort to the distraught California mother. More than two years after Sasha and Andre Lazarevich were spirited to rural Serbia by their father, they remain hostages in a country indifferent to its own laws and international pressure.
NEWS
December 31, 1997 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shayna Gluck Lazarevich fought a long, hard legal battle to win her children back from her ex-husband, who abducted them from California and took them to war-torn Yugoslavia. Fearing that he might take the children again, she pressured authorities to punish him with a long sentence in a U.S prison. In August, when Dragisa Lazarevich was finally deported from the United States after serving a brief sentence for federal crimes, Shayna Lazarevich appeared to be rid of her ex-husband at last.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1997 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Serbian man charged with kidnapping his ex-wife's children from California in 1989 and keeping them in war-torn Yugoslavia for six years received the maximum possible sentence Monday for passport fraud, a crime authorities said facilitated the abduction. U.S. District Judge Audrey B. Collins sentenced Dragisa Lazarevich, 45, to two years in prison, the longest sentence allowed under complex federal sentencing guidelines.
NEWS
October 21, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the rush to reward Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic for his pledge to be a partner in the search for Balkan peace, Western governments have swept aside evidence of his flouting of the outside world's will and conscience.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1997 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight years after her ex-husband abducted her children and took them to a country at war, and two years after she won an international legal battle to wrest them back, Shayna Gluck Lazarevich once again lives in fear. She is afraid her ex-husband, a Serbian arms manufacturer now in federal custody in the United States, will soon be freed--perhaps as early as today.
NEWS
May 1, 1994 | CONNIE CASS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lilly Waken's husband and two young daughters left home for a party and never came back. Frantically she called police, she called hospitals--then she learned her Arab husband had bought three one-way tickets to Damascus, Syria. That was 18 months ago, and Waken hasn't seen her children since. Her husband returned to Miami once--without the children--for a divorce hearing.
NEWS
June 6, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there was a single, galvanizing moment in the life of Slobodan Milosevic when a vista of power and glory opened to lure him from mediocrity, it was April 24, 1987, and the scene was Kosovo Polje. There, amid crumbling apartment blocks and wind-tossed rubbish, the pudgy, cigar-smoking banker-turned-Communist Party bureaucrat glimpsed a path to greatness.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|