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OPINION
August 20, 2012 | By Jeff Dietrich
For years Sheba lived on the streets with Georgina. "When it was cold, she kept me warm," Georgina recalled recently, "and if I got attacked, she protected me. " Sheba was a patient, loving German shepherd mix whose excess belly fat and low-hanging nipples gave testimony to her maternal nature. Everyone on skid row - kids, cops, prostitutes, pimps - loved her. But her best friends were the homeless street addicts who live outside our Catholic Worker soup kitchen, particularly Georgina.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2014 | By F. Kathleen Foley
Playwright William Inge was part and parcel of the 1950s, a time of scenery-chomping melodrama in the American theater zeitgeist. If not delicately interpreted, his plays can seem positively sappy by modern standards. Fortunately, the current revival of Inge's 1950 drama “Come Back, Little Sheba” at A Noise Within largely steers clear of blatancy, thanks to the skillful co-direction of Julia Rodriguez-Elliott and Geoff Elliott. When the characters do veer into apparent superficiality, it's very much to a poignant and devastating point.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
"Come Back, Little Sheba" at the Los Angeles Theatre Center feels like a 1950 Chevrolet being driven around the block for the first time in years. It handles very well, but there's a reluctance to open 'er up. William Inge's play briefly roared to life on Friday night when Doc (Charles Hallahan) came home plastered and took a good look at the woman he had been hitched to for 20 years (Tyne Daly).
OPINION
August 20, 2012 | By Jeff Dietrich
For years Sheba lived on the streets with Georgina. "When it was cold, she kept me warm," Georgina recalled recently, "and if I got attacked, she protected me. " Sheba was a patient, loving German shepherd mix whose excess belly fat and low-hanging nipples gave testimony to her maternal nature. Everyone on skid row - kids, cops, prostitutes, pimps - loved her. But her best friends were the homeless street addicts who live outside our Catholic Worker soup kitchen, particularly Georgina.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1985
Two lions that escaped Sunday morning from an animal compound near Sylmar were found several hours later under a nearby bush and were recaptured by compound workers and sheriff's deputies. Sheba and Zambi fled from the Wild Life Way Station in Little Tujunga Canyon before noon when heavy winds tore loose a 13-foot-high compound gate that smashed open their cage, said Martine Colette, founder and director of the way station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1991
In response to Chuck Trudeau's letter, I think it is time that we enlighten Mr. Trudeau and other readers of the events leading to the decision to part with our "wonder dog" Dusty. Little does Mr. Trudeau know that during the last nine months prior to Dusty's epic journey there were a number of not-so-wonderful events. Let me begin with poor Sheba, Dusty's four-year-old mother, a collie mix. Sheba by nature is a placid, friendly dog with motherly instincts. In fact when it came to chow time, Sheba frequently left some of her food for Dusty.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | From Times wire services
A dispatcher taking an emergency 911 call was puzzled when the caller said nothing, just growled. Dispatchers traced the call to a house, and when police arrived, they didn't find Spuds McKenzie, only a snarling 2-year-old pit bull named Sheba and two puppies, Lt. Lyle Roberts said. One of the puppies had the receiver of the push-button telephone in its mouth. "There were no humans in the house," Roberts said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2010
The world was stunned 52 years ago with the news from Madrid that movie star Tyrone Power had died at the age of 44. The athletic, handsome actor had been a leading player in Hollywood since his first starring role in 1936's "Lloyd's of London. " Over the subsequent two decades, the versatile matinee idol had proven he was adept at swashbucklers (1942's "The Black Swan"), westerns ( 1939's "Jesse James"), film noirs (1947's "Nightmare Alley") and romantic dramas (1946's "The Razor's Edge")
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1987 | JANICE ARKATOV
"I'd like to be glamorous some time soon," Tyne Daly mused, "I'd like to be done with the sad and frumpy ladies. In some ways, I hope this is my definitive frump." The frump of the moment is Lola in William Inge's "Come Back, Little Sheba," opening Friday at the Los Angeles Theatre Center.
NEWS
August 16, 2007 | From the Associated Press
S. Epatha Merkerson, who starred in a revival of William Inge's "Come Back, Little Sheba" at the Kirk Douglas Theatre in Culver City earlier this summer, is taking the role to Broadway. Merkerson will star as Lola, a blowzy, lonely housewife, in the drama that opens Jan. 24, the Manhattan Theatre Club announced Wednesday. It will be the play's first Broadway revival. The original 1950 production starred Shirley Booth. Merkerson is best known for her 13 seasons as Lt.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2010
The world was stunned 52 years ago with the news from Madrid that movie star Tyrone Power had died at the age of 44. The athletic, handsome actor had been a leading player in Hollywood since his first starring role in 1936's "Lloyd's of London. " Over the subsequent two decades, the versatile matinee idol had proven he was adept at swashbucklers (1942's "The Black Swan"), westerns ( 1939's "Jesse James"), film noirs (1947's "Nightmare Alley") and romantic dramas (1946's "The Razor's Edge")
NEWS
August 16, 2007 | From the Associated Press
S. Epatha Merkerson, who starred in a revival of William Inge's "Come Back, Little Sheba" at the Kirk Douglas Theatre in Culver City earlier this summer, is taking the role to Broadway. Merkerson will star as Lola, a blowzy, lonely housewife, in the drama that opens Jan. 24, the Manhattan Theatre Club announced Wednesday. It will be the play's first Broadway revival. The original 1950 production starred Shirley Booth. Merkerson is best known for her 13 seasons as Lt.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2007 | Amy Kaufman, Times Staff Writer
"You," says Jenna Gavigan, shaking a quavering finger in the air and assuming the gravelly tone of Kirk Douglas, "you're a vixen." The 21-year-old actress is camped out next to her Ahi Three Ways salad, recounting the words the legendary Douglas dispensed her way after the opening of William Inge's "Come Back, Little Sheba" at Douglas' namesake theater in Culver City. The play tells the story of the disenchanted Lola (S.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2007 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
In case you're wondering why there haven't been many major revivals of William Inge's "Come Back, Little Sheba," two words should clear up the mystery: Shirley Booth. The performances she gave on Broadway in 1950 and on film in 1952 -- winning both a Tony and an Oscar -- sealed the deal. No reason for anyone to compete with that kind of blowsy perfection.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2007 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
SOME people would consider S. Epatha Merkerson the most fortunate kind of celebrity there is -- an anonymous one. The "Law & Order" star can ride the New York subway next to junkies of NBC's long-running and seemingly ubiquitous procedural crime show, and even though they know that they know her, they may not know why. "Hi, there," they say. "Hey," she says back. Two days later, it hits them that they've had a brush with intrepid police Lt. Anita Van Buren.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2004 | Rob Kendt,
The gift of gab is a precious endowment for stage characters, whose well-turned words can make them larger than life in ways films can't. When the short blond huckster Doc Honeygreen (Skip Pipo) enters the theater in "The Queen of Sheba" to pitch his "genuine all-American golden tonic," he towers by sheer force of personality. He has us from hello.
NEWS
January 20, 1985 | CONNIE STEWART
--Sheba the mathematical dog was famous for a little while, but eventually someone figured out that her talents didn't add up. Richard and Frances Morgan's spitz-keeshond had been barking the answers to complicated math problems for the last two years. Sheba was begging for a cracker in their Knightstown, Ind., home one day when Mrs. Morgan told her: "I'm going to teach you to count for your crackers." That afternoon, the dog learned to bark once when Mrs.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2000 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
Set in the Depression-era South, Bill Harris' "The Queen of Sheba" at the Complex sets forth a fascinating premise but falls victim to its own desultory chatter and a lackluster staging by director Yvette Culver. A lifelong huckster, Doc Honeygreen (Bob Broughton), has found that he sells more bottles of his curative elixir if Thalia (Adrianne Harris), a toothsome young African American woman, prances around in sateen scanties during his pitch.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2001 | Jana J. Monji
William Inge's play "Come Back, Little Sheba," at the Group Repertory Theatre, is about coming to terms with loss as an older couple feels their age. Director Lonny Chapman has double-cast this production. In the performance reviewed, Christopher Weeks and Geraldine Allen give touching performances as a codependent couple in a low-rent district. Weeks as Doc gives subtle signs of interest in his young boarder, Marie (Michelle Jonas), who lives in the converted dining room.
NEWS
May 1, 2001 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"A modern Indiana Jones," a Times reviewer said of Nicholas Clapp's last book, "The Road to Ubar," in which the Los Angeles-based filmmaker and archeology lecturer described the search for a fabled Arabian city that had flourished by trading in frankincense. Long buried by the sands of the peninsula's arid "Empty Quarter," a vast desert, Ubar was located with the aid of satellite imagery that revealed a web of ancient caravan routes. "Sheba" is just as readable.
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