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NEWS
July 2, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Edward J. Carlough, who led the Sheet Metal Workers International Assn. for more than two decades and became one of labor's most influential leaders, has died. He was 62. Carlough died Wednesday while being treated for cancer in New Bern, N.C. A resident of the Washington suburb of Rockville, Md., Carlough was a union member for 38 years. He served in its international offices as research director and director of organizing. He retired in 1993 after 23 years as general president.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2012 | Hector Tobar
Tarita Ventura is a lover. She loves music, and sings in several genres: country, soul, rock, blues. It was the pursuit of a singing career that brought her to Los Angeles a decade ago from Texas. Tarita loves making things with her hands. Her father was a construction man, back in her native Oklahoma, a place that still lives in her tongue as a noticeable drawl. When singing in L.A. didn't pay the bills, it was with her hands, swinging a hammer at construction sites, that Tarita earned the money that fed her four children.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1985 | Associated Press
Edward F. Carlough, president emeritus of the Sheet Metal Workers Union and negotiator of the first health, welfare and pension plans in the construction industry, is dead at the age of 81. Carlough, who served as the top officer of the 150,000-member union for more than a decade, died Tuesday at his home in Alexandria, Va. The labor leader, born in the Bronx, N.Y.
NEWS
July 2, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Edward J. Carlough, who led the Sheet Metal Workers International Assn. for more than two decades and became one of labor's most influential leaders, has died. He was 62. Carlough died Wednesday while being treated for cancer in New Bern, N.C. A resident of the Washington suburb of Rockville, Md., Carlough was a union member for 38 years. He served in its international offices as research director and director of organizing. He retired in 1993 after 23 years as general president.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1988 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Even though the nation's pension funds lost a bundle in the market on Oct. 19, Black Monday, nearly $2 trillion is still left in reserves for money managers to handle, and they come up daily with ideas for investing those vast sums. The primary goal must be to manipulate the money so it will increase and thereby help ensure pensions for retirees.
NEWS
June 27, 1989
Lonnie A. Bassett, 62, secretary-treasurer of the Sheet Metal Workers' International Assn., AFL-CIO. Bassett joined the Washington-based sheet metal workers' international office in 1961. In 1970 he became director of organizing for the union, serving in that capacity until 1985. That same year he was appointed secretary-treasurer. A statement by the Sheet Metal Workers' International Assn. described Bassett as an "outspoken advocate for the need to establish programs upgrading members' skills to better compete for jobs."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2012 | Hector Tobar
Tarita Ventura is a lover. She loves music, and sings in several genres: country, soul, rock, blues. It was the pursuit of a singing career that brought her to Los Angeles a decade ago from Texas. Tarita loves making things with her hands. Her father was a construction man, back in her native Oklahoma, a place that still lives in her tongue as a noticeable drawl. When singing in L.A. didn't pay the bills, it was with her hands, swinging a hammer at construction sites, that Tarita earned the money that fed her four children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2001
Arturo "Art" Porras died of cancer at his Santa Paula home Tuesday. He was 69. Porras, who worked for the Sheet Metal Workers Union and taught at Ventura College, was born June 16, 1931, in El Paso. He was a Ventura County resident for the last 60 years. He graduated from Santa Paula High School in 1950 and lettered in varsity football and track. After graduation, he enlisted in the Air Force and served in the Korean War.
NEWS
February 26, 1986 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
Reagan Administration lawyers, supporting white firefighters from Cleveland and white sheet metal workers from New York, urged the Supreme Court on Tuesday to outlaw preferential job treatment for nonwhites who are not proven victims of discrimination. In oral arguments, the justices asked numerous questions of lawyers in the two cases as they once again took up the politically sensitive issue of affirmative action.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Navy bade farewell Monday to 52 Japanese workers who had been brought to its naval shipyard at Long Beach from a U.S. Navy facility in Japan because the service could not find any skilled American workers willing to take temporary jobs at Long Beach. A political furor erupted after union members at the shipyard protested the use of the Japanese workers, who came from the Navy's yard at Yokosuka, Japan.
NEWS
June 27, 1989
Lonnie A. Bassett, 62, secretary-treasurer of the Sheet Metal Workers' International Assn., AFL-CIO. Bassett joined the Washington-based sheet metal workers' international office in 1961. In 1970 he became director of organizing for the union, serving in that capacity until 1985. That same year he was appointed secretary-treasurer. A statement by the Sheet Metal Workers' International Assn. described Bassett as an "outspoken advocate for the need to establish programs upgrading members' skills to better compete for jobs."
BUSINESS
March 8, 1988 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Even though the nation's pension funds lost a bundle in the market on Oct. 19, Black Monday, nearly $2 trillion is still left in reserves for money managers to handle, and they come up daily with ideas for investing those vast sums. The primary goal must be to manipulate the money so it will increase and thereby help ensure pensions for retirees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1985 | Associated Press
Edward F. Carlough, president emeritus of the Sheet Metal Workers Union and negotiator of the first health, welfare and pension plans in the construction industry, is dead at the age of 81. Carlough, who served as the top officer of the 150,000-member union for more than a decade, died Tuesday at his home in Alexandria, Va. The labor leader, born in the Bronx, N.Y.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1991 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An unfair labor practice charge has been filed against Southwest Marine by an attorney for two workers who said they were terminated for wearing union buttons on the job. Earlier this month, non-union Southwest Marine flew in about 50 sheet metal mechanics and carpenters from Northwest Marine, its sister shipyard in Portland, Ore., to work on the Viking Serenade cruise ship.
NEWS
October 7, 1985 | Associated Press
The Supreme Court, setting the stage for an important ruling on racial preferences in the workplace, today agreed to review a quota system for promoting blacks and Latinos among Cleveland's firefighters, and also decided to study court-ordered quotas for union membership. The court voted to hear a challenge to the Cleveland quota system by a predominantly white firefighters union. The challenge is supported by the Reagan Administration.
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