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WORLD
April 4, 2012 | By Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
DAMASCUS, Syria - He doesn't have a cellphone and doesn't use regular phones. He avoids his home and mostly ventures out under cover of night, a cap pulled low on his head to conceal his identity. "For 11 months, I have not been in a public place, not in a restaurant or a cafe," Yassin Haj Saleh, a former political prisoner, said as he arrived at a previously agreed-upon rendezvous spot as darkness fell. Despite his clandestine existence, Saleh is a prominent Syrian dissident, a prolific writer and columnist with a wide following both in print and on the Internet.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By James C. Taylor
LONDON - "Abandon all hope ye who enter here. " The quote from Dante, scrawled as graffiti on a New York wall, opens Bret Easton Ellis' incendiary 1991 novel, "American Psycho. " The famous phrase is ostensibly about entering the gates of hell, but it could apply equally to the long, exhausting process of creating a major new musical. Ellis' use of Dante is not lost on the ambitious team behind "American Psycho," the new stage musical based on the novel - the phrase also appears on large video projections over London's Almeida Theatre stage.
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OPINION
July 13, 2003
Re "Sheik Helps School, but There's a Hitch," July 3: So school officials in south Orange County are balking at a badly needed, no-strings-attached cash donation because it comes from an Arab sheik? Must be nice. I'm sure there are more than a few even more needy schools a little to the north that wouldn't look this gift horse in the mouth. The sheik's gift to Harvard is a whole different story. It was conditioned on the creation of a position and curricula and was offered to one of the best-funded institutions in the world.
WORLD
August 11, 2013 | By Nabih Bulos
BEIRUT - With his pouty lips and soulful eyes, he was a stylish figure known as the King of Romance, a crooner of amorous ballads often seen cavorting with would-be starlets in MTV-style videos filmed on yachts, in upscale cafes and in swank homes. But Fadel Shaker's latest video - without a note uttered - may become his swan song, portraying the balladeer in a new and disturbing incarnation: hunkered down defiantly with a militant sheik and his armed followers, holding out against Lebanese soldiers he derided as dogs and pigs.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several silent film classics have just arrived on your local video and DVD shelves, featuring such Hollywood legends as Charlie Chaplin, Rudolph Valentino and Gloria Swanson. A new collection from Kino, "Notorious Movies of the Jazz Age," presents restored versions of three dramas from the 1920s: "The Affairs of Anatol," "The Battle of the Sexes" and "Son of the Sheik." The movies are all on video (at $25 each), and "Son of the Sheik" is also available on DVD ($30). Cecil B.
OPINION
September 23, 1990
On his sojourn to the Middle East, Secretary of State James Baker may end up dancing sheik to sheik. ED KYSAR Reseda
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sheik Saad Al Abdullah Al Sabah, 78, a former Kuwaiti emir who ruled the small oil-rich kingdom for nine days in 2006 before being removed because of ill health, died Tuesday in Kuwait City, state television reported. As crown prince, Saad automatically became ruler when his distant cousin and then emir, Sheik Jaber Al Ahmed Al Sabah, died Jan. 15, 2006. But it became increasingly clear that Saad's poor health would not allow him to carry out his new responsibilities. His health started deteriorating after he suffered colon bleeding in 1997.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1999 | PHILIP BRANDES
"Shut Your Eyes and Think of England," a British farce with modest ambitions, receives an appropriately breezy and innocuous staging at the Knightsbridge Theatre in Pasadena. John Chapman and Anthony Marriott's arch dialogue pokes fun at England's not-too-distant financial troubles, when the influx of Arab money threatened the very core of the country's centuries-encrusted class snobbery.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1994 | NANCY SPILLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This week Universal Studios released "The Little Rascals," a multimillion-dollar remake of the scruffy kid series that has charmed the world since its birth in 1922. This "Rascals" is remarkably faithful to the Hal Roach originals, right down to Alfalfa's cowlick, Darla's feminine mystique, Froggy's croak and the circle around Petey's eye. Even some of the original locations have been used, with filming in Burbank neighborhoods unchanged since the '20s and '30s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1989 | BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writer
As a beloved ex-President, Ronald Reagan almost always gets what he wants these days. But this week, one of Reagan's personal wishes was blocked by a federal convict with a typewriter. Last Friday, Reagan personally telephoned the National Park Service in Washington to add his support to proposed national historic landmark status for a mitten-shaped hill in the Santa Monica Mountains that includes prized Chumash Indian cave paintings. But on Monday, when the Park Service's advisory board met, it concluded that its hands were tied.
WORLD
June 15, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Alexandra Sandels
TEHRAN - A week ago, many observers viewed Iran's presidential election as a horse-race among conservative hard-liners hostile to reform. Then came an unexpected surge in support for Hassan Rowhani, a soft-spoken, bespectacled and bearded cleric who is now improbably positioned to become the next president of the Islamic Republic. Many of those who attended his animated campaign rallies were enthusiastic young people. At one of his last rallies, a DJ fired up the crowd by playing "Yare Dabestani," or "My Fellow Student," which coincidentally - or not - was a revolutionary song popular among the opposition "green movement" that was crushed after Iran's 2009 vote.
WORLD
September 11, 2012 | By Lutfi Sheriff Mohammed and Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
MOGADISHU, Somalia — Lawmakers overwhelmingly elected an academic and civic activist as president of Somalia on Monday, in a United Nations-backed effort to put the country's lawless past behind it and forge its first stable central government in more than two decades. Hassan Sheik Mohamud defeated about two dozen other candidates, including two outgoing leaders, President Sheik Sharif Sheik Ahmed and Prime Minister Abdiweli Mohamed Ali. The victor, a former UNICEF official and founder of the opposition Peace and Development Party, is seen as a progressive.
WORLD
April 30, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
UMM AL FAHM, Israel — He's an Israeli-born Islamist whom the government considers so dangerous he's been banned from stepping foot in Jerusalem. Yet his prison stints over the last decade for allegedly funding terrorist groups, inciting violence and spitting on an Israeli security officer — all of which he denies — have only served to make Sheik Raed Saleh, 53, extremely popular and influential among Arab Israelis. After returning this month from London, where he successfully fought deportation by British immigration officials who cited his controversial views, Saleh received a hero's welcome.
WORLD
April 4, 2012 | By Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
DAMASCUS, Syria - He doesn't have a cellphone and doesn't use regular phones. He avoids his home and mostly ventures out under cover of night, a cap pulled low on his head to conceal his identity. "For 11 months, I have not been in a public place, not in a restaurant or a cafe," Yassin Haj Saleh, a former political prisoner, said as he arrived at a previously agreed-upon rendezvous spot as darkness fell. Despite his clandestine existence, Saleh is a prominent Syrian dissident, a prolific writer and columnist with a wide following both in print and on the Internet.
SPORTS
March 31, 2012 | Wire reports
Monterosso won the $10-million Dubai World Cup, the world's richest horse race, handing the ruler of Dubai an emotional victory after one of his horses was euthanized earlier Saturday. Monterosso, who finished third last year, also gave a much-needed confidence boost to Sheik Mohammed bin Rashid al Maktoum's stables, which had not won the race since 2006. All four of their horses were longshots. Capponi grabbed the lead coming into the straight only to see Monterosso bolt past and beat his stablemate by three lengths.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Neither man was senior in his realm: a U.S. Army captain with a civil affairs group and a Sunni sheik of a middling tribe. Both had elders of greater authority above them. To their critics and rivals, the two men were opportunists with outsized egos. And yet, it is now clear that Capt. Travis Patriquin and Sheik Sattar abu Risha were major figures in the amazingly quick evolution of Iraq's Anbar province from a "lost cause" Al Qaeda stronghold in 2006 to a shining example by mid-2007 of the U.S. military and Sunni tribes teaming up to thwart the insurgency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2000
Re "Marine, Sheik's Daughter Defy Tradition for Love," July 10: Initially, the story of the young Marine and the sheik's daughter--Meriam Al-Khalifa and Pfc. Jason Johnson--conjures up thoughts of Romeo and Juliet. But I'm wondering if Dred Scott might be the more apt analogy. This young woman made her own choice of a husband despite the risk of assault or even murder if caught escaping or if sent back. In the process, she gave up luxury and security for menial work and a precarious future.
WORLD
November 24, 2008 | FROM TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Lawyers for Michael Jackson have reached a settlement with a Bahraini sheik who says the singer owes him $7 million after breaching a signed contract, the pop star's spokeswoman said. The out-of-court settlement means Jackson will not give evidence at London's High Court as scheduled today, Celena Aponte said. Sheik Abdulla bin Hamad al Khalifa said he gave the singer millions and planned a series of collaborations. Khalifa, 33, invited Jackson to the small, oil-rich Persian Gulf state to escape the media spotlight.
WORLD
July 4, 2011 | By Raheem Salman and Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
Abdullah Saadi fingers the fine brown leather belt with holsters for thimble-sized coffee cups and a dagger. He is a keeper of customs, Baghdad's professional server of coffee. He sits in a brick house behind an iron gate in the cramped warrens of Sadr City. The room is painted bright lemon in contrast to the gray street outside. His mother walks through the room, half-embarrassed, singing for guests, "I am the mother of the coffee maker. " She thumps her chest and laughs at her son. In Iraq, coffee isn't merely a matter of ordering a grande to go from Starbucks.
WORLD
February 8, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
The city of Jerusalem gave the go-ahead Monday to a new Jewish housing project in the Arab-dominated neighborhood of Sheik Jarrah, raising the prospect of more Palestinian evictions in East Jerusalem. The privately owned development would consist of 13 apartments in two structures. Construction is not expected to break ground for at least two years as the project works its way through the city and federal approval process. But the plans are already stirring controversy in the hotly disputed neighborhood.
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