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Sheik Ahmed Yassin

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NEWS
May 22, 1989
Israeli troops carried out the biggest single roundup of Palestinians during the 17-month-old uprising in the occupied territories, arresting 250 activists of Hamas, a Muslim fundamentalist movement. The group's spritual leader, Sheik Ahmed Yassin, was among those detained in the raid, designed to cut the level of violence in the Gaza Strip. The army accused Yassin, 51 and confined to a wheelchair, of ordering anti-Israeli activities, including the killing of Palestinians suspected of collaborating with Israel.
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OPINION
March 28, 2004
Some readers of The Times offer the opinion that Sheik Ahmed Yassin could have been apprehended (letters, March 25). That is ludicrous. He would have been defended by possibly hundreds of followers. How many Israeli soldiers and Palestinian lives would have had to be sacrificed to apprehend him? After apprehending him, how would the world view his incarceration and possible trial? Some other countries would not want him executed. What would the Israelis do with him? Then there is the possibility of Hamas taking hostages or blackmailing the Israelis with multiple bombings for his return.
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OPINION
March 23, 2004
Re "Founder of Hamas Dies in Israeli Strike," March 22: Israel's killing of Hamas founder Sheik Ahmed Yassin is a great step forward for both peace and security. Yassin, who dedicated his life to destroying Israel, was the opposite of a great Arab leader like Anwar Sadat, who literally gave his life for peace. Yassin should be remembered as the man who thwarted peacenik Shimon Peres' reelection in 1996 with unrelenting terror attacks, created Hamas' suicide cult with Saudi money and rejected even temporary truces with Israel.
OPINION
March 25, 2004
In "An Unwise Assassination" (editorial, March 23) you again criticize Israel for defending itself against Hamas and other terrorism while offering a soft condemnation for the act of Palestinian suicide bombings. Israel has to defend itself, and especially against Hamas, the group that has vowed no compromise for the complete destruction of the Jewish state. Sheik Ahmed Yassin was released in 1997 from an Israeli jail only after promising to end all violence. He broke that promise and promoted unspeakable, nonstop violence.
OPINION
October 19, 2002
In "Locked in War's Embrace" (Opinion, Oct. 13), Amy Wilentz depicts Israel's Prime Minister Ariel Sharon as a villain. No better than a ruthless dictator. She even goes as far as to claim that Sharon and Hamas share the common goal of "the destruction of peace." She states that Sharon contemplates transferring all the Palestinians out of Israel. I hardly think the elected leader of a democratic state actually believes he can organize the expulsion of more than 2 million people. Wilentz asks why Sharon doesn't bulldoze the house of Sheik Ahmed Yassin, the spiritual founder of Hamas, as he does the compounds of Yasser Arafat and other collaborators of terror.
OPINION
March 28, 2004
Some readers of The Times offer the opinion that Sheik Ahmed Yassin could have been apprehended (letters, March 25). That is ludicrous. He would have been defended by possibly hundreds of followers. How many Israeli soldiers and Palestinian lives would have had to be sacrificed to apprehend him? After apprehending him, how would the world view his incarceration and possible trial? Some other countries would not want him executed. What would the Israelis do with him? Then there is the possibility of Hamas taking hostages or blackmailing the Israelis with multiple bombings for his return.
OPINION
March 25, 2004
In "An Unwise Assassination" (editorial, March 23) you again criticize Israel for defending itself against Hamas and other terrorism while offering a soft condemnation for the act of Palestinian suicide bombings. Israel has to defend itself, and especially against Hamas, the group that has vowed no compromise for the complete destruction of the Jewish state. Sheik Ahmed Yassin was released in 1997 from an Israeli jail only after promising to end all violence. He broke that promise and promoted unspeakable, nonstop violence.
OPINION
March 23, 2004 | Amy Wilentz, Amy Wilentz, a former Jerusalem correspondent for the New Yorker, is the author of the novel "Martyrs' Crossing" (Ballantine, 2002).
In 1997, the spiritual leader of Hamas, Sheik Ahmed Yassin, was released from an Israeli prison where he'd served eight years of a life sentence. Upon his return to Gaza, he was taken from a helicopter to the Khan Yunis refugee camp, where I stood among thousands of his ecstatic supporters. It was a wild, electric scene.
WORLD
September 25, 2003 | Henry Chu and Fayed abu Shammalah, Special to The Times
The spiritual leader of Islamic militant group Hamas insisted Wednesday that his organization would not disarm, grant a cease-fire or participate in the government of the incoming Palestinian Authority prime minister. Sheik Ahmed Yassin, who was wounded this month by an Israeli airstrike, said violence against the Jewish state would continue despite Israel's campaign to hunt down and kill Hamas leaders and operatives.
NEWS
November 9, 1997 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After eight years in an Israeli prison, Sheik Ahmed Yassin is home and living under Palestinian rule for the first time in his life. But the Hamas spiritual leader is not celebrating his freedom. Yassin, who turned down many conditional Israeli offers for his release over the years, says he has merely exchanged a small jail cell for the "big prison" of Gaza. "Israeli soldiers control the roads and borders and prevent our freedom of movement," the Islamic leader said in an interview.
OPINION
March 23, 2004 | Amy Wilentz, Amy Wilentz, a former Jerusalem correspondent for the New Yorker, is the author of the novel "Martyrs' Crossing" (Ballantine, 2002).
In 1997, the spiritual leader of Hamas, Sheik Ahmed Yassin, was released from an Israeli prison where he'd served eight years of a life sentence. Upon his return to Gaza, he was taken from a helicopter to the Khan Yunis refugee camp, where I stood among thousands of his ecstatic supporters. It was a wild, electric scene.
OPINION
March 23, 2004
Re "Founder of Hamas Dies in Israeli Strike," March 22: Israel's killing of Hamas founder Sheik Ahmed Yassin is a great step forward for both peace and security. Yassin, who dedicated his life to destroying Israel, was the opposite of a great Arab leader like Anwar Sadat, who literally gave his life for peace. Yassin should be remembered as the man who thwarted peacenik Shimon Peres' reelection in 1996 with unrelenting terror attacks, created Hamas' suicide cult with Saudi money and rejected even temporary truces with Israel.
WORLD
March 22, 2004 | Ken Ellingwood and Fayed abu Shammalah, Special to The Times
Missiles fired from an Israeli military helicopter killed Hamas spiritual leader Sheik Ahmed Yassin early today, striking down the highest-profile symbol of Palestinian resistance to Israel in the Gaza Strip and prompting furious threats of massive retaliation from his militant group. Yassin, a quadriplegic who used a wheelchair, was on his way home from dawn prayers at a Gaza City mosque when the strike occurred.
WORLD
September 25, 2003 | Henry Chu and Fayed abu Shammalah, Special to The Times
The spiritual leader of Islamic militant group Hamas insisted Wednesday that his organization would not disarm, grant a cease-fire or participate in the government of the incoming Palestinian Authority prime minister. Sheik Ahmed Yassin, who was wounded this month by an Israeli airstrike, said violence against the Jewish state would continue despite Israel's campaign to hunt down and kill Hamas leaders and operatives.
OPINION
October 19, 2002
In "Locked in War's Embrace" (Opinion, Oct. 13), Amy Wilentz depicts Israel's Prime Minister Ariel Sharon as a villain. No better than a ruthless dictator. She even goes as far as to claim that Sharon and Hamas share the common goal of "the destruction of peace." She states that Sharon contemplates transferring all the Palestinians out of Israel. I hardly think the elected leader of a democratic state actually believes he can organize the expulsion of more than 2 million people. Wilentz asks why Sharon doesn't bulldoze the house of Sheik Ahmed Yassin, the spiritual founder of Hamas, as he does the compounds of Yasser Arafat and other collaborators of terror.
NEWS
November 9, 1997 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After eight years in an Israeli prison, Sheik Ahmed Yassin is home and living under Palestinian rule for the first time in his life. But the Hamas spiritual leader is not celebrating his freedom. Yassin, who turned down many conditional Israeli offers for his release over the years, says he has merely exchanged a small jail cell for the "big prison" of Gaza. "Israeli soldiers control the roads and borders and prevent our freedom of movement," the Islamic leader said in an interview.
WORLD
March 22, 2004 | Ken Ellingwood and Fayed abu Shammalah, Special to The Times
Missiles fired from an Israeli military helicopter killed Hamas spiritual leader Sheik Ahmed Yassin early today, striking down the highest-profile symbol of Palestinian resistance to Israel in the Gaza Strip and prompting furious threats of massive retaliation from his militant group. Yassin, a quadriplegic who used a wheelchair, was on his way home from dawn prayers at a Gaza City mosque when the strike occurred.
NEWS
March 7, 1995 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Israel jailed Sheik Ahmed Ismael Yassin six years ago, convicting him in a military court of ordering the killing of its soldiers and Palestinian collaborators, the expectation was that the Islamic Resistance Movement he had founded would collapse and the rebellion here against the Israeli occupation would end. "Without Sheik Yassin, we were expected simply to die away, but the very opposite happened," said Mahmoud Zahhar, the spokesman for Hamas, as the movement is known.
NEWS
March 7, 1995 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Israel jailed Sheik Ahmed Ismael Yassin six years ago, convicting him in a military court of ordering the killing of its soldiers and Palestinian collaborators, the expectation was that the Islamic Resistance Movement he had founded would collapse and the rebellion here against the Israeli occupation would end. "Without Sheik Yassin, we were expected simply to die away, but the very opposite happened," said Mahmoud Zahhar, the spokesman for Hamas, as the movement is known.
NEWS
May 22, 1989
Israeli troops carried out the biggest single roundup of Palestinians during the 17-month-old uprising in the occupied territories, arresting 250 activists of Hamas, a Muslim fundamentalist movement. The group's spritual leader, Sheik Ahmed Yassin, was among those detained in the raid, designed to cut the level of violence in the Gaza Strip. The army accused Yassin, 51 and confined to a wheelchair, of ordering anti-Israeli activities, including the killing of Palestinians suspected of collaborating with Israel.
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