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Sheila Copps

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BUSINESS
March 24, 1999 | JAMES BATES
It's ironic that Canada's Sheila Copps was in Los Angeles last weekend for Hollywood's biggest event, the Oscars, given that she is regularly at odds with the U.S. entertainment industry. As that country's heritage minister, Copps, who was in town to celebrate Canadian director Norman Jewison's Irving G. Thalberg Award, is an outspoken proponent of aggressive government actions that aid Canadian books, magazines, music, TV shows and movies, sometimes at the expense of American product.
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BUSINESS
March 24, 1999 | JAMES BATES
It's ironic that Canada's Sheila Copps was in Los Angeles last weekend for Hollywood's biggest event, the Oscars, given that she is regularly at odds with the U.S. entertainment industry. As that country's heritage minister, Copps, who was in town to celebrate Canadian director Norman Jewison's Irving G. Thalberg Award, is an outspoken proponent of aggressive government actions that aid Canadian books, magazines, music, TV shows and movies, sometimes at the expense of American product.
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NEWS
May 2, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Deputy Prime Minister Sheila Copps resigned from Parliament, fulfilling a 1993 campaign promise to quit if the government failed to abolish an unpopular tax on all goods and services. Prime Minister Jean Chretien's government had pledged in its campaign platform to "replace" the 7% tax adopted by the government of former Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, but instead last month moved to merge the federal tax with provincial sales taxes.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2000 | Reuters
Canada will launch a sweeping review of its newspaper ownership rules in a move that could allow foreign players into a market where dozens of daily and community newspapers have just gone on the auction block. The review, likely to include soul-searching public and parliamentary hearings, could begin to dismantle--or at least relax--long-standing policies designed to protect home-grown media.
NEWS
November 5, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Liberal Party leader Jean Chretien took office as Canada's 20th prime minister Thursday and immediately set to work on economic problems that drove the Conservatives from power. He scheduled his first Cabinet meeting hours after being sworn in by Governor General Ramon John Hnatyshyn and hinted that one of his first tasks will be renegotiating terms of a North American free trade zone. He also canceled contracts for British-Italian military helicopters worth $4.8 billion Canadian ($3.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1994 | From Reuters
The world's two largest trading partners edged closer to a trade war over wheat Friday after the United States said it will restrict imports of Canadian wheat, flour and barley beginning July 1. Canada criticized the United States for not playing the free-trade game fairly and threatened to slap tariffs on U.S. chicken, wine, bourbon, pasta, canned fruits and bakery goods. U.S.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1997 | JAMES BATES
Let's get this straight: Canada's second-ranking official, Deputy Prime Minister and Heritage Minister Sheila Copps, makes the front pages last week by threatening a trade war against Hollywood to protect the Great White North against "American cultural imperialism." Never mind that the suggestion came in a week when the British Commonwealth cleaned our clocks in Oscar nominations.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1997 | From Reuters
A World Trade Organization appeals board on Monday decided against Canada in a dispute with the United States, ruling that Canadian taxes on advertising in local editions of foreign magazines violate global trading rules. The appeals board ruling effectively upheld the earlier decision of a WTO panel, which had found that laws seeking to protect Canadian magazines against foreign competition--mostly from U.S. magazines--were not in the interests of free trade.
NEWS
July 20, 1994 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Al Gore met with Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien and other top officials here Tuesday, emphasizing the strong friendship and economic ties that endure between the two countries despite rising trade tensions. In public remarks, Gore, Chretien and Canadian Deputy Prime Minister Sheila Copps all stressed the historic amity between the United States and Canada.
NEWS
April 5, 1996 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a quarter of a century, Quebec delegations have worked as sort of shadow embassies and consulates to their Canadian counterparts. They have served to remind the world of Quebec's distinct place as the center of French language and culture in North America, to promote trade and investment, and, when a separatist government is in power in Quebec City as it is now, they tout the province's aspirations toward independence from the rest of Canada.
NEWS
March 30, 1991 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The province of Quebec threw down the gauntlet this week: It promised to conduct a referendum on the sovereignty question by October, 1992, and challenged English-speaking Canada to do something to stop it. Baffled, worried and fed-up English-speaking Canadians are now waiting to see what their elected officials will tell Quebec on their behalf. One man who is helping to come up with a response is Keith Spicer, head of the Citizens' Forum on Canada's Future.
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