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Sheila Heslin

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NEWS
December 19, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Clinton White House official asked the CIA in 1995 to provide intelligence on several U.S. citizens despite a presidential order banning the agency from distributing such information, according to CIA documents and U.S. intelligence sources. The requests were made by Sheila Heslin, then a White House National Security Council staff member in charge of coordinating U.S. policy on the Caucasus and oil-rich Caspian Sea region of the former Soviet Union.
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NEWS
December 19, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Clinton White House official asked the CIA in 1995 to provide intelligence on several U.S. citizens despite a presidential order banning the agency from distributing such information, according to CIA documents and U.S. intelligence sources. The requests were made by Sheila Heslin, then a White House National Security Council staff member in charge of coordinating U.S. policy on the Caucasus and oil-rich Caspian Sea region of the former Soviet Union.
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SPORTS
November 20, 1992 | HEATHER STEVENS
Rachel Hochgesang had 34 kills to lead Sunny Hills to a 15-9, 11-15, 15-13, 15-8 victory over Fountain Valley in the Southern Section Division III semifinals Thursday at La Habra High School. The Lancers (19-1) will play Bishop Montgomery in Saturday's championship match at Cerritos College. "All we do is go out and play defense," Sunny Hills Coach Ron Kasser said. "We just keep mixing it up, try and keep the ball in play and sometimes we put one down."
NEWS
March 19, 1997 | Associated Press
The former chairman of the Democratic National Committee denied Tuesday that he or party aides asked the CIA to vouch for a donor who was seeking meetings with White House officials. Donald L. Fowler also disputed reports that he pressured a National Security Council aide to persuade her not to oppose future White House meetings with oil financier Roger Tamraz.
NEWS
December 10, 1997 | From The Times Washington Bureau
SCOUT'S HONOR: Last month, Sen. Fred Thompson (R-Tenn.) and two other Republican members of the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee introduced S. 1409, an unusual piece of legislation that could be called the "Sheila Heslin Relief Act." The bill, pending before the Judiciary Committee, seeks to reimburse Heslin for tens of thousands of dollars in legal costs she incurred as part of her Sept. 17 appearance before the panel investigating campaign finance abuses.
NEWS
September 18, 1997 | MARC LACEY and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Her voice full of anger, a former White House National Security Council aide told a Senate investigating committee Wednesday that government officials pressured her to stop being "such a Girl Scout" and withdraw her strong opposition to a major Democratic donor's international business project.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1997 | JAMES RISEN and ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton asked a senior White House official to look into whether the United States should support an international business venture of a major Democratic campaign contributor after the donor approached him about it at a White House reception last year, administration officials said Tuesday. Clinton directed senior advisor Thomas F.
NEWS
September 19, 1997 | GLENN F. BUNTING and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a surprising development that could improve prospects for an overhaul of the campaign finance system, Senate Republicans tentatively agreed Thursday to pull back on their investigation into political fund-raising abuses to pave the way for a full floor debate on fund-raising reform. Such an arrangement also could signal a truce--for a while, at least--in the hearings' steady Republican barrage against Democratic fund-raising practices, including some activities of Vice President Al Gore. Sen.
NEWS
September 10, 1997 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In testimony during the Senate campaign fund-raising hearings on Tuesday, former Democratic Chairman Donald L. Fowler accepted some responsibility for the scandal that exploded at the Democratic National Committee last year but laid a portion of the blame at the gates of the White House, where presidential advisor Harold M. Ickes became a de facto party chairman.
NEWS
September 19, 1997 | MARC LACEY and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
International businessman Roger Tamraz says that over the years, he's been kidnapped by Lebanese suicide bombers. He's been beaten and tortured and almost poisoned to death. He's been arrested by security forces in a former Soviet republic, had a billion dollars of his assets seized and staged clandestine meetings with foreign heads of state.
NEWS
April 5, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A major contributor to the Democratic Party, seeking to win Turkish support for his multibillion-dollar business venture, privately boasted to Turkey's prime minister that he enjoyed direct access to President Clinton. The effort by Roger Tamraz, a Lebanese American entrepreneur, to exploit his purported ties to Clinton--an effort described in detail by Turkish officials--provides a glimpse of the value of White House access for promoters of overseas business deals.
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