Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSheila Jordan
IN THE NEWS

Sheila Jordan

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
There are jazz singers and there are jazz singers. And then there's Sheila Jordan. And the very fact that one can describe her as a unique musical entity may be the best explanation of what is so special about her art. The New Yorker made one of her rare visits to the Southland this week, in part to teach some seminars and some individual students, in part to perform Thursday at the Vic in Santa Monica.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2012
MUSIC New York City-based vocalist Kate McGarry celebrates the release of her album "Girl Talk," a tribute to the singer's "beloved jazz singer-mothers" that includes nods toward Betty Carter, Sheila Jordan and Carmen McRae. Adding to the album's distinctively contemporary spark are underlying nods toward the sexual politics of today such as on an inspired turn with Rogers and Hammerstein's "We Kiss in a Shadow. " The Blue Whale, 123 Astronaut E S Onizuka St. Suite 301, L.A. 9 p.m. Sat. $10. http://www.bluewhalemusic.com .
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
Sheila Jordan has fought many demons in her life. The road that led to her current level of vocal success (she opens tonight for a three-day stint at the Catalina Bar and Grill in Hollywood) was long and tortuous. Born in Detroit to a 16-year-old mother, she was raised by grandparents in an impoverished coal-mining area of Pennsylvania. "I never dreamed of becoming a singer," she recalls.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
There are jazz singers and there are jazz singers. And then there's Sheila Jordan. And the very fact that one can describe her as a unique musical entity may be the best explanation of what is so special about her art. The New Yorker made one of her rare visits to the Southland this week, in part to teach some seminars and some individual students, in part to perform Thursday at the Vic in Santa Monica.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1989 | DON HECKMAN
Calling Sheila Jordan a singer is--to use a proverbial comparison--a bit like calling "Great Expectations" a book. In her opening-night performance at Catalina's Bar & Grill Thursday night, Jordan's program of jazz vocal improvisations pulsed and throbbed with the same kind of layered emotional density that can transform a "book" into a great novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Few jazz singers have devoted themselves to the pure craft of their art with the determination of Sheila Jordan--a devotion, in essence, to the songs themselves, to the never-ending exploration of musical content. A few others come to mind--Betty Carter, Jeanne Lee, Jay Clayton, Irene Kral, sometimes Abbey Lincoln. But Jordan, more than most, has never wavered in her dedication to the music, unswayed by the blandishments of the pop world.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2012
MUSIC New York City-based vocalist Kate McGarry celebrates the release of her album "Girl Talk," a tribute to the singer's "beloved jazz singer-mothers" that includes nods toward Betty Carter, Sheila Jordan and Carmen McRae. Adding to the album's distinctively contemporary spark are underlying nods toward the sexual politics of today such as on an inspired turn with Rogers and Hammerstein's "We Kiss in a Shadow. " The Blue Whale, 123 Astronaut E S Onizuka St. Suite 301, L.A. 9 p.m. Sat. $10. http://www.bluewhalemusic.com .
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1992 | LEONARD FEATHER
The story of Sheila Jordan, who opened Thursday and closes Sunday at Catalina Bar & Grill, is the stuff of legend. Befriended by Bird, tutored by Tristano--she saw and heard it all back in New York's Birdland era. You hear it in her voice when she brings a hip sensitivity to everything from "Body and Soul" (singing the almost-forgotten verse) to the 1948 ballad "Haunted Heart."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1989 | A. JAMES LISKA
Steve Kuhn, the New York pianist whose playing has encompassed a wide range of jazz styles, stuck close to be-bop at the Catalina Bar & Grill where he began a six-night stand Tuesday night. Working with bassist Buster Williams and drummer Al Foster, Kuhn's opening set at the Hollywood club included four standards from the jazz repertoire, each serving to show the pianist's fine technique and his extraordinary interpretive abilities. "There Is No Great Love" started the set at an easily paced sling tempo with Kuhn taking a simple, economical approach to the melody, and drummer Foster, playing deftly with wire brushes, caressing the rhythm.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Singer Sheila Jordan remembers the exact moment when she decided what her life's work would be. "I sang all the time when I was a little kid," she recalls. "But I didn't know what kind of music I wanted to sing until I heard Charlie Parker. It was on one of those old Savoy 78s, I think--Charlie Parker and His Re-Boppers. And as soon as I heard it I said, 'Oh, that's it. That's the music I want to devote the rest of my life to. Whether I sing it or just support it or whatever.'
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Few jazz singers have devoted themselves to the pure craft of their art with the determination of Sheila Jordan--a devotion, in essence, to the songs themselves, to the never-ending exploration of musical content. A few others come to mind--Betty Carter, Jeanne Lee, Jay Clayton, Irene Kral, sometimes Abbey Lincoln. But Jordan, more than most, has never wavered in her dedication to the music, unswayed by the blandishments of the pop world.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1992 | LEONARD FEATHER
The story of Sheila Jordan, who opened Thursday and closes Sunday at Catalina Bar & Grill, is the stuff of legend. Befriended by Bird, tutored by Tristano--she saw and heard it all back in New York's Birdland era. You hear it in her voice when she brings a hip sensitivity to everything from "Body and Soul" (singing the almost-forgotten verse) to the 1948 ballad "Haunted Heart."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1989 | A. JAMES LISKA
Steve Kuhn, the New York pianist whose playing has encompassed a wide range of jazz styles, stuck close to be-bop at the Catalina Bar & Grill where he began a six-night stand Tuesday night. Working with bassist Buster Williams and drummer Al Foster, Kuhn's opening set at the Hollywood club included four standards from the jazz repertoire, each serving to show the pianist's fine technique and his extraordinary interpretive abilities. "There Is No Great Love" started the set at an easily paced sling tempo with Kuhn taking a simple, economical approach to the melody, and drummer Foster, playing deftly with wire brushes, caressing the rhythm.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1989 | DON HECKMAN
Calling Sheila Jordan a singer is--to use a proverbial comparison--a bit like calling "Great Expectations" a book. In her opening-night performance at Catalina's Bar & Grill Thursday night, Jordan's program of jazz vocal improvisations pulsed and throbbed with the same kind of layered emotional density that can transform a "book" into a great novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
Sheila Jordan has fought many demons in her life. The road that led to her current level of vocal success (she opens tonight for a three-day stint at the Catalina Bar and Grill in Hollywood) was long and tortuous. Born in Detroit to a 16-year-old mother, she was raised by grandparents in an impoverished coal-mining area of Pennsylvania. "I never dreamed of becoming a singer," she recalls.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Singer Sheila Jordan remembers the exact moment when she decided what her life's work would be. "I sang all the time when I was a little kid," she recalls. "But I didn't know what kind of music I wanted to sing until I heard Charlie Parker. It was on one of those old Savoy 78s, I think--Charlie Parker and His Re-Boppers. And as soon as I heard it I said, 'Oh, that's it. That's the music I want to devote the rest of my life to. Whether I sing it or just support it or whatever.'
SPORTS
July 12, 1995
After 13 years in Los Angeles, the Raiders are being heartily welcomed back to Oakland. The Alameda County Board of Supervisors voted, 5-0, Tuesday to approve the deal that would make the Raiders the first U.S. sports team to return to its roots. The Oakland City Council gave its seal of approval Tuesday night, 9-0.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|