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Sheila Lynch

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BUSINESS
January 29, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whenever Sheila Lynch walks out of her downtown art studio, she eyes that same bus bench. Unlike most bus benches in the Los Angeles area, this one doesn't have an advertisement on it for some funeral home or dating service. Instead, it simply has a message that tells advertisers the space is available. Lynch doesn't create ads. She creates art. But she figured that if there was room for ads on bus benches, there must also be some room for art.
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BUSINESS
January 29, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whenever Sheila Lynch walks out of her downtown art studio, she eyes that same bus bench. Unlike most bus benches in the Los Angeles area, this one doesn't have an advertisement on it for some funeral home or dating service. Instead, it simply has a message that tells advertisers the space is available. Lynch doesn't create ads. She creates art. But she figured that if there was room for ads on bus benches, there must also be some room for art.
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NEWS
September 30, 1989 | TOBEY BENEDICT, The Christian Science Monitor
As the Coast Guard boat skims across Boston Harbor, it draws closer to the island lighthouse, one of only five manually operated lights in the United States. Salt water sprays off the rocks while sea birds circle around a lobster boat a little ways offshore. For 273 years, lighthouse keepers on Little Brewster Island have used the beacon to guide ships safely.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1995 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an annual race of electric vehicles that ended last week in Portland, Me., a four-passenger sedan was driven 238 miles--with power to spare--on a single battery charge. Four other electric cars in the American Tour de Sol, which began in Waterbury, Conn., went more than 100 miles on a charge. Proponents of alternative vehicles said the cars' performances showed the improvements being made in electric-car batteries and stand in contrast to more pessimistic assessments by large auto makers.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | JON MARCUS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Conditions aboard the Norwegian tanker Iver Christina were so threatening to the environment that federal officials refused to let it enter Boston Harbor to unload its 12.6 million gallons of industrial oil. Inspection parties in November found that the vessel carried oil instead of water in its ballast tanks and had inoperable valves and rusted ventilation systems that posed major threats to the environment.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1993 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Bebo Saab wishes he could walk. It says so on bus benches all over Los Angeles. The message isn't scrawled in graffiti. And it isn't some feel-good advertisement, either. It is honest-to-gosh art--featuring Bebo's top three wishes for 1994 and an image of the 16-year-old's hand gesturing "thumbs-up." Such optimism might seem unexpected considering that Saab was born with cerebral palsy.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW
The visual arts account for $316,537 of $2,844,925 in L.A. Endowment for the Arts grants, which will be formally announced by the Cultural Affairs Department next Sunday. Many of the programs financed involve working with children, ranging from latchkey kids to troubled teens.
NEWS
August 29, 1990 | NANCY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the more notable issues of the 1988 presidential campaign was the horrendous pollution of Boston Harbor. George Bush blamed Michael S. Dukakis, his Democratic opponent, for allowing the harbor to become the dirtiest in the United States. Today, Bush is President, Dukakis is the lame-duck governor, and the $6.1-billion harbor cleanup, under federal court supervision, is well under way with little help from either of the 1988 presidential contenders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2006 | Nancy Wride, Times Staff Writer
A Long Beach police officer struck a pedestrian with his patrol car early Tuesday, killing a mother of five and caterer who had for years helped recovering addicts by giving them work and encouragement. Kathryn Stephens, 39, died at the scene. She was the sister-in-law of the secretary at the station where the officer worked. Police said the officer was a 27-year veteran but did not identify him. An investigation has been launched.
NEWS
August 26, 2001 | RICHARD SIMON and TERRIL YUE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In an unusual meeting of the minds, environmentalists and auto industry representatives got together with lawmakers earlier this year and agreed on a new incentive to advance both of their causes: a tax credit for fuel-efficient "hybrid" cars. The idea seemed like a winner. Now, with legislation approved by the House and headed to the Senate, environmentalists say the industry has finagled the fine print to give the tax credit to the very epitome of excess: gas-guzzling sport-utility vehicles.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW
An American penny becomes a cobra snake with a long thin mass of copper stretched between the coin's "head" and "tail"; a nurse's cap becomes a mother's breast complete with a nipple sculpted from human hair; a crucifix becomes an old-fashioned scale, with the weights consisting of two bags of gold resembling figures in mourning; and an American flag becomes a literal black-and-white, stars-and-stripes image with the stars coming from a photograph of the night sky.
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