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Sheila Tate

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NEWS
February 6, 1989 | From Times wire services and
Sheila Tate, spokeswoman for George Bush's presidential campaign and White House transition office, today joined the lobbying firm of Cassidy and Associates as vice chairman for public relations. Tate was Nancy Reagan's press secretary during President Ronald Reagan's first term.
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NEWS
February 6, 1989 | From Times wire services and
Sheila Tate, spokeswoman for George Bush's presidential campaign and White House transition office, today joined the lobbying firm of Cassidy and Associates as vice chairman for public relations. Tate was Nancy Reagan's press secretary during President Ronald Reagan's first term.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
President Reagan has renominated Sheila Tate to be a member of the board of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. The name of the former press secretary to First Lady Nancy Reagan was submitted to the Senate for approval in late fall, but no action was taken before adjournment. Tate is an executive with the Burson-Marsteller public relations firm in Washington.
NEWS
November 26, 1988 | From Associated Press
Sheila Tate, President-elect George Bush's campaign and transition press secretary, said Friday that she has taken herself out of the competition for the same job in the Bush White House. "I found myself in almost a permanent bad mood, thinking about what did I want to do," Tate said in an interview from transition headquarters in Washington. "I talked to members of my family, and I just had a reluctance to give up the good personal life."
NEWS
November 26, 1988 | From Associated Press
Sheila Tate, President-elect George Bush's campaign and transition press secretary, said Friday that she has taken herself out of the competition for the same job in the Bush White House. "I found myself in almost a permanent bad mood, thinking about what did I want to do," Tate said in an interview from transition headquarters in Washington. "I talked to members of my family, and I just had a reluctance to give up the good personal life."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
CPB's New Leader: Sheila Tate, former press secretary for Nancy Reagan and campaign and transition press secretary for President-elect Bush, is the new chairman of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Named as vice chairman by the seven-member CPB board of directors was Honey Alexander, a children's advocate and wife of Secretary of Education Lamar Alexander.
NEWS
January 15, 1985 | Associated Press
Sheila Tate, press secretary to Nancy Reagan for the last four years, plans to resign to take a senior vice presidency at the nation's largest public relations firm, Burson-Marsteller, the White House said today. Tate, who often is credited with helping turn the First Lady's image around after she encountered a barrage of criticism about her designer clothes and society friends at the outset of her husband's first term, said she will leave the White House in February.
NEWS
January 16, 1985 | United Press International
Sheila Tate, First Lady Nancy Reagan's press secretary, is resigning to become senior vice president in the Washington office of Burson-Marsteller, a public relations firm, the White House announced Tuesday. Tate, 42, told reporters that she thought "four years is long enough." Mrs. Reagan said that she was accepting the resignation of her chief spokeswoman with "deep regret. I will always value the hard work and dedication Sheila brought to the position of press secretary."
NEWS
February 4, 1985 | United Press International
Jennifer Hirshberg, a government public relations specialist who once taught in Glendale, Calif., will succeed Sheila Tate as Nancy Reagan's $55,733-a-year press secretary, effective Feb. 11, the First Lady announced today. Hirshberg, 42, a former reporter for the Washington Star, is currently director of the Office of Public Affairs for the Federal Trade Commission. In a telephone interview she said that she contemplates no changes in the First Lady's operations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1987
If I had a person as devoted to me as Mrs. Reagan is to President Reagan, I would consider myself very fortunate. Her actions were very supportive and loving. I say this as a person who did not vote for President Reagan and who, after all, disagrees with the President's policies. But I am impressed with Mrs. Reagan's 10,000% backing of her husband. Perhaps some of the criticism of the First Lady is in fact based on bruised macho egos. Washington is a man's turf. And as former Press Secretary Sheila Tate said about her former boss, Nancy Reagan, some of the flap about Nancy's role in Irangate arises from macho types who are not accustomed to dealing with a powerful woman: a woman of substance and great intelligence.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
President Reagan has renominated Sheila Tate to be a member of the board of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. The name of the former press secretary to First Lady Nancy Reagan was submitted to the Senate for approval in late fall, but no action was taken before adjournment. Tate is an executive with the Burson-Marsteller public relations firm in Washington.
NEWS
November 25, 1988 | United Press International
President-elect George Bush's campaign press secretary, Sheila Tate, said today she does not want to be White House press secretary in the new Administration. Tate, 47, told United Press International that she told Bush on Wednesday: "I didn't want to be considered for any job." "I talked to him about it," she said, and added that Bush told her, "I understand the job is tough."
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