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Sheilah Graham

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NEWS
November 18, 1988 | Associated Press
Sheilah Graham, the legendary Hollywood gossip columnist who with Louella Parsons and Hedda Hopper formed what came to be known as the "Unholy Trio," has died in a hospital here. She was in her late 70s or early 80s. A funeral home spokesman said today that Graham died Thursday. No cause of death was given. Graham, born in London's East End in 1904, lived a life as controversial as the people she wrote about. She had a love affair with novelist F.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Since the publication in 1920 of F. Scott Fitzgerald's first novel, "This Side of Paradise," his life and career have been scrutinized, studied and dissected in countless critical essays, articles and biographies. Hollywood too has been endlessly fascinated with his novels and short stories. In fact, there have been four feature adaptations alone of his 1925 Jazz Age novel, "The Great Gatsby," the latest being Baz Luhrmann's opulent 3D version that opened to big ticket sales Friday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1988 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Sheilah Graham, the last of the self-styled "Unholy Trio" of gossip columnists who sparked fear in the hearts of actors and their studio bosses alike, has died in a West Palm Beach, Fla., hospital. The one-time mistress of F. Scott Fitzgerald who wrote of their tortured affair in "Beloved Infidel," a best-selling book made into a 1959 film, was either 80 or 76, according to differing biographical sources. But she was 84, according to her daughter, Wendy Fairey. A spokesman at E.
BOOKS
September 24, 1995 | Sybil Sever Kretzmer, Sybil Sever-Kretzmer collects books and memorabilia about America's Lost Generation
Having been born to one of the most famous couples of this century--America's greatest modern writer, F. Scott Fitzgerald and his talented flapper wife Zelda Sayre--Scottie Fitzgerald was thrust a heavy mantle, particularly as their only child. Add to that the heady cocktail of parental alcoholism, prescription drug abuse, numerous failed suicide attempts and schizophrenia. Talent and tragedy were genetically passed on to Scottie as surely as her blond hair and blue eyes. Until now, very little was known about the Fitzgeralds' daughter beyond her school days.
NEWS
May 6, 1987 | Marylouise Oates
Tucked in the corner booth at Trumps on Saturday night was a piece of Hollywood and literary history, a legend in her own time. But, quick, before she could be consigned to the memory file, Sheilah Graham had a few things to say. Her signature hat perched above a face still pretty after eight decades, the once-and-future author had spent the day in an "exhausting" visit to the Hayworth Avenue apartment where famed novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1989 | STEVE HARVEY, From staff and wire reports
The first outing of Downtown Pedal Power started off with a bang Thursday from bicyclist Mike Massell's front tire. "It must have been glass," said the unperturbed Massell, 82, who thinks nothing of cycling 40 miles in a day. After a quick inner-tube change, he set off from Pershing Square on a lunch-time jaunt with two dozen other members of the club, which is trying to spread the radical gospel of human-powered transportation in the central...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Since the publication in 1920 of F. Scott Fitzgerald's first novel, "This Side of Paradise," his life and career have been scrutinized, studied and dissected in countless critical essays, articles and biographies. Hollywood too has been endlessly fascinated with his novels and short stories. In fact, there have been four feature adaptations alone of his 1925 Jazz Age novel, "The Great Gatsby," the latest being Baz Luhrmann's opulent 3D version that opened to big ticket sales Friday.
BOOKS
September 24, 1995 | Sybil Sever Kretzmer, Sybil Sever-Kretzmer collects books and memorabilia about America's Lost Generation
Having been born to one of the most famous couples of this century--America's greatest modern writer, F. Scott Fitzgerald and his talented flapper wife Zelda Sayre--Scottie Fitzgerald was thrust a heavy mantle, particularly as their only child. Add to that the heady cocktail of parental alcoholism, prescription drug abuse, numerous failed suicide attempts and schizophrenia. Talent and tragedy were genetically passed on to Scottie as surely as her blond hair and blue eyes. Until now, very little was known about the Fitzgeralds' daughter beyond her school days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1997 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald died in West Hollywood, but he spent the last productive period of his life in the Valley--more precisely, in a spot on Amestoy Avenue in Encino that is now taken up by the westbound lane of the Ventura Freeway near Balboa Boulevard. The chronicler of America's Jazz Age came to Southern California, like many of his contemporaries, to write for the movies. It was in Encino that Fitzgerald wrote much of his unfinished novel, "The Last Tycoon."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1985 | ELISABETH GRAHAM
In some circles, Neil Simon has the unfair reputation of being a slick laugh machine with no heart. Another visit to "Plaza Suite," courtesy of Garden Grove Community Theatre, verifies that Simon is a superb play-by-play man of the human comedy who treats his people affectionately without losing objectivity. Sadly, this fact is unapparent in Garden Grove's production under the misguided direction of Robert Michael Conrad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1989 | STEVE HARVEY, From staff and wire reports
The first outing of Downtown Pedal Power started off with a bang Thursday from bicyclist Mike Massell's front tire. "It must have been glass," said the unperturbed Massell, 82, who thinks nothing of cycling 40 miles in a day. After a quick inner-tube change, he set off from Pershing Square on a lunch-time jaunt with two dozen other members of the club, which is trying to spread the radical gospel of human-powered transportation in the central...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1988 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Sheilah Graham, the last of the self-styled "Unholy Trio" of gossip columnists who sparked fear in the hearts of actors and their studio bosses alike, has died in a West Palm Beach, Fla., hospital. The one-time mistress of F. Scott Fitzgerald who wrote of their tortured affair in "Beloved Infidel," a best-selling book made into a 1959 film, was either 80 or 76, according to differing biographical sources. But she was 84, according to her daughter, Wendy Fairey. A spokesman at E.
NEWS
November 18, 1988 | Associated Press
Sheilah Graham, the legendary Hollywood gossip columnist who with Louella Parsons and Hedda Hopper formed what came to be known as the "Unholy Trio," has died in a hospital here. She was in her late 70s or early 80s. A funeral home spokesman said today that Graham died Thursday. No cause of death was given. Graham, born in London's East End in 1904, lived a life as controversial as the people she wrote about. She had a love affair with novelist F.
NEWS
May 6, 1987 | Marylouise Oates
Tucked in the corner booth at Trumps on Saturday night was a piece of Hollywood and literary history, a legend in her own time. But, quick, before she could be consigned to the memory file, Sheilah Graham had a few things to say. Her signature hat perched above a face still pretty after eight decades, the once-and-future author had spent the day in an "exhausting" visit to the Hayworth Avenue apartment where famed novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald died.
NEWS
September 22, 1998
Gerold Frank, 91, author who pioneered the "as told to" celebrity biography. Frank achieved global success in his collaboration with Mike Connolly and singer Lillian Roth on her memoir, "I'll Cry Tomorrow," which was made into a 1955 film starring Susan Hayward. Frank also assisted gossip columnist Sheilah Graham on "Beloved Infidel," the story of her relationship with F. Scott Fitzgerald. That book was also made into a film in 1959 starring Gregory Peck and Deborah Kerr.
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