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Shelburne Museum

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2006 | Lisa Rathke, The Associated Press
It is nearly impossible to see all the 150,000 pieces of folk art, artifacts and Americana at Shelburne Museum in one visit. Visitors can wander through the old New England homes, barns and buildings and view American folk art, decoys, impressionist paintings, quilts and furniture. They can inspect a 4,000-piece miniature circus parade carved out of wood that winds through one building or 225 carriages and horse-drawn vehicles on display in other buildings. This summer there's even more to see.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2006 | Lisa Rathke, The Associated Press
It is nearly impossible to see all the 150,000 pieces of folk art, artifacts and Americana at Shelburne Museum in one visit. Visitors can wander through the old New England homes, barns and buildings and view American folk art, decoys, impressionist paintings, quilts and furniture. They can inspect a 4,000-piece miniature circus parade carved out of wood that winds through one building or 225 carriages and horse-drawn vehicles on display in other buildings. This summer there's even more to see.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1987 | KYMBERLY TAYLOR, United Press International
A whimsical folk art exhibit opening Sunday at the National Gallery brings color, fine craftmanship and a bit of fun to the museum's often serious-minded east building. The diverse array of more than 100 early 19th-Century artifacts, titled "An American Sampler: Folk Art From the Shelburne Museum," was directed by John Wilmerding, the art scholar responsible for bringing the acclaimed Helga paintings by Andrew Wyeth to Washington earlier this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2000 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
J. Watson Webb Jr., veteran film editor who also headed the museum of Americana created by his family in Shelburne, Vt., is dead at 84. Webb died Saturday in his Brentwood home. Born in New York City and educated at Yale, the scion of the wealthy, art-collecting family decided to make his individual mark on life in Hollywood. He became a film editor and rose to head the editing department at 20th Century Fox.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2000 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
J. Watson Webb Jr., veteran film editor who also headed the museum of Americana created by his family in Shelburne, Vt., is dead at 84. Webb died Saturday in his Brentwood home. Born in New York City and educated at Yale, the scion of the wealthy, art-collecting family decided to make his individual mark on life in Hollywood. He became a film editor and rose to head the editing department at 20th Century Fox.
TRAVEL
November 26, 1989 | BEVERLY BEYER and ED RABEY, Beyer and Rabey are Los Angeles travel writers .
The Shelburne Museum, just a few miles north of this attractive college town between the Champlain Valley and the Green Mountains, offers 45 scenic acres crammed with 37 period homes, 200,000 pieces of American folk art and artifacts, 100 antique carriages and sleds, plus a Vermont round barn and the Ticonderoga, a 220-foot side-wheeler that once sailed Lake Champlain.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1989 | ZAN DUBIN
"An American Sampler: Folk Art from the Shelburne Museum" opens Thursday at the County Museum of Art with 120 works that, in their way, help define the nation's history. The collection was initially amassed by Electra Havemeyer Webb, an enormously wealthy New Englander who had a lifelong passion for native handmade objects. Webb founded the Shelburne Museum in Vermont in 1947 to house her renowned collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1996 | SHAUNA SNOW
MUSIC Adieu, Tenorissimos: In what they claim will be their final concert appearance together, the Three Tenors--Luciano Pavarotti, Placido Domingo and Jose Carreras--will perform at the Houston Astrodome on March 16, with James Levine conducting. Billed as "one last opportunity to indulge in the grace and charm of three of the most talented tenors of all time," tickets for "The Grand Finale!" go on sale Friday morning through Ticketmaster outlets in Houston, San Antonio and Dallas.
NEWS
March 28, 1985 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
Question: I collect an assortment of tinware--things like coffeepots, lunch boxes, trays and the like. What tips can you provide for judging the age of this stuff?--T.C. Answer: Tinware is fun to collect, most collectors associated with this field say, because of the beauty of the items that can be found and because they can shed some light on a particular period. Some collectors note that an art technique can provide you with information as to when the piece was produced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1993 | From Associated Press
Museum shops can provide a one-stop solution for some of your holiday gift needs. And their offerings can be pleasantly offbeat: If you're looking for a diminutive Gutenberg printing press for a super-literate nephew, or green chocolate frogs for a sweet-toothed aesthete, read on. Usually, sales from a museum's gift shop help support the not-for-profit institution and its work. Here are a few items from the huge selection of offerings.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1987 | KYMBERLY TAYLOR, United Press International
A whimsical folk art exhibit opening Sunday at the National Gallery brings color, fine craftmanship and a bit of fun to the museum's often serious-minded east building. The diverse array of more than 100 early 19th-Century artifacts, titled "An American Sampler: Folk Art From the Shelburne Museum," was directed by John Wilmerding, the art scholar responsible for bringing the acclaimed Helga paintings by Andrew Wyeth to Washington earlier this year.
NEWS
February 16, 1989 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
Jack P. Hennessy, the Confrerie des Chevaliers du Tastevin Le Grand Senechal, had just invoked the blessing: "Send down, O Lord, we humbly pray, your blessings on . . . Les Chevaliers !" With that, dinner chairman John Hotchkis proclaimed, "Let the dinner begin."
TRAVEL
January 11, 1998 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Paradise is a subjective thing: a secluded tropical beach. A bottomless shopping spree at Barneys. Eating all the chocolate you want and never gaining weight. Mine is being able to work on craft projects for days without major disruptions. Anyone who sews, crochets, knits, weaves, wood works, etc., understands this. I love my husband, I love my job and I love my cats, but they leave precious little time for much else.
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