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Shelby Foote

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OPINION
July 1, 2005
Shelby Foote, the last great Southern historian of the South before and during the War Between the States, has gone. The Times published a large and respectful obituary (June 29). It took participation in Ken Burns' miniseries to bring this man's gifts to light, for which I will always be grateful. Now, the only ones to relate this history will be weakened by the voices of the victors and relegated to repaint this war and its times with broader, and less capable, strokes. The Old South and its ways die daily as prosperity dilutes its citizenry to opportunists of all stripes.
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OPINION
July 1, 2005
Shelby Foote, the last great Southern historian of the South before and during the War Between the States, has gone. The Times published a large and respectful obituary (June 29). It took participation in Ken Burns' miniseries to bring this man's gifts to light, for which I will always be grateful. Now, the only ones to relate this history will be weakened by the voices of the victors and relegated to repaint this war and its times with broader, and less capable, strokes. The Old South and its ways die daily as prosperity dilutes its citizenry to opportunists of all stripes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2005 | Nick Owchar, Times Staff Writer
Southern novelist and historian Shelby Foote, who chronicled Mississippi Delta life in his fiction and created a panoramic history of the Civil War, died Monday in Memphis, Tenn., his wife, Gwyn, said Tuesday. He was 88. No cause of death was given. Best-known for the courtly eloquence he brought as commentator to Ken Burns' 1990 PBS documentary, "The Civil War," Foote belonged to a rich tradition of Mississippi storytellers that has included William Faulkner, Walker Percy and Eudora Welty.
NATIONAL
July 1, 2005 | From Associated Press
Historian Shelby Foote was buried Thursday under a huge magnolia tree near the graves of Civil War combatants whose exploits he chronicled in one of the best-known books about the conflict. Following a graveside service kept brief according to his wishes, Foote was buried on a tree-covered hill in Elmwood Cemetery, one of the South's most historic graveyards and the burial ground for more than 1,000 Civil War soldiers, including 22 generals.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1998 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Slade's nerves were edgier and edgier as the days passed late last week. The world premiere of "Shiloh," his original dramatization of the novel by prominent Civil War historian Shelby Foote, was approaching rapidly, and he still hadn't heard from Foote, who had the power to cancel the show if he didn't approve. Permission to write the adaptation had been gained and contracts signed, but what did Foote think of Slade's script?
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | ELEANOR RANDOLPH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somewhere under the half-drunk whiskey bottles that fans perpetually leave on his grave, William "Bro Will" Faulkner must be smiling mischievously. Here we are in the bumper-sticker age, the era of micro-mini-attention spans and sound bites and instant information overload.
NATIONAL
July 1, 2005 | From Associated Press
Historian Shelby Foote was buried Thursday under a huge magnolia tree near the graves of Civil War combatants whose exploits he chronicled in one of the best-known books about the conflict. Following a graveside service kept brief according to his wishes, Foote was buried on a tree-covered hill in Elmwood Cemetery, one of the South's most historic graveyards and the burial ground for more than 1,000 Civil War soldiers, including 22 generals.
BOOKS
November 15, 1998 | MICHAEL HENRY HEIM, Michael Henry Heim has translated Chekhov's major plays, a collection of his letters ("Anton Chekhov's Life and Thought"), and Henri Troyat's biography, "Chekhov." He teaches in the department of Slavic languages and literatures at UCLA
"Chekhovian" may not roll off the tongue as easily as "Kafkaesque," yet in its way it is every bit as evocative of how we construe the 20th century. (Ironically, Chekhov and Kafka died of the quintessentially 19th century illness, consumption; they were both in their early 40s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Historian Shelby Foote, the principal commentator in the PBS series "The Civil War," recalls when he was simply a secluded scholar who wrote by hand and went days with no company other than his wife and daughter. Now the phone rings constantly in his Memphis, Tenn., home, Foote told People magazine in its Oct. 15 issue. Thirty-six years after he published the three-volume "The Civil War: A Narrative," Foote suddenly is being sought by the media.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Cybill Shepherd says movie studios are afraid to make a film about racism. "Prejudice is ever present. It's just uncomfortable. People don't want to recognize it in themselves," the "Moonlighting" actress said Wednesday while promoting the TV movie "Memphis," which airs next year. The movie is about the kidnaping of the grandson of a wealthy black businessman from Memphis in the 1950s. Shepherd plays a kidnaper who develops a maternal bond with the child.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2005 | Nick Owchar, Times Staff Writer
Southern novelist and historian Shelby Foote, who chronicled Mississippi Delta life in his fiction and created a panoramic history of the Civil War, died Monday in Memphis, Tenn., his wife, Gwyn, said Tuesday. He was 88. No cause of death was given. Best-known for the courtly eloquence he brought as commentator to Ken Burns' 1990 PBS documentary, "The Civil War," Foote belonged to a rich tradition of Mississippi storytellers that has included William Faulkner, Walker Percy and Eudora Welty.
BOOKS
November 15, 1998 | MICHAEL HENRY HEIM, Michael Henry Heim has translated Chekhov's major plays, a collection of his letters ("Anton Chekhov's Life and Thought"), and Henri Troyat's biography, "Chekhov." He teaches in the department of Slavic languages and literatures at UCLA
"Chekhovian" may not roll off the tongue as easily as "Kafkaesque," yet in its way it is every bit as evocative of how we construe the 20th century. (Ironically, Chekhov and Kafka died of the quintessentially 19th century illness, consumption; they were both in their early 40s.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1998 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Slade's nerves were edgier and edgier as the days passed late last week. The world premiere of "Shiloh," his original dramatization of the novel by prominent Civil War historian Shelby Foote, was approaching rapidly, and he still hadn't heard from Foote, who had the power to cancel the show if he didn't approve. Permission to write the adaptation had been gained and contracts signed, but what did Foote think of Slade's script?
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | ELEANOR RANDOLPH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somewhere under the half-drunk whiskey bottles that fans perpetually leave on his grave, William "Bro Will" Faulkner must be smiling mischievously. Here we are in the bumper-sticker age, the era of micro-mini-attention spans and sound bites and instant information overload.
TRAVEL
September 21, 1997
Thursday is the 100th anniversary of the birth of Nobel Prize-winning novelist William Faulkner--and the opening date for "Words & Music: A Literary Feast in New Orleans." In what they hope will become an annual event, the nonprofit Pirate's Alley Faulkner Society Inc. will present a writers' conference, a book market, music and New Orleans cuisine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1998 | TROY HEIE
A three-weekend run of Shelby Foote's dramatic Civil War play "Shiloh" begins tonight at the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza. The battle at Shiloh occurred in 1862 near Pittsburgh Landing, Tenn., and Shelby's play captures the "inner movements of the combatants' hearts and minds," said Lynda Paige Fulford, spokeswoman for Cal Lutheran University, which is sponsoring the play along with the Santa Susana Repertory Company.
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