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Shelby Steele

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OPINION
January 13, 1991 | Janet Clayton, Janet Clayton is assistant editor of the editorial page. She interviewed Shelby Steele near the author's college office
It is a measure of Shelby Steele's ability to engage and agitate that the mention of his name raises blood pressures and decibel levels during many a conversation in black America. The author of the best-selling book "The Content of Our Character: A New Vision of Race in America" is hailed by admirers as a breath of fresh air in a national racial discussion grown stale.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
Claude Steele, a social psychology expert who is the dean of Stanford University's Graduate School of Education, will become the provost of UC Berkeley, it was announced Monday. UC Berkeley chancellor Nicholas Dirks on Monday announced his appointment of Steele, with whom he worked at Columbia University in the past. Steele's nomination and salary as provost and executive vice chancellor -- the No. 2 job at the UC campus -- will be reviewed by the UC regents at their meeting next week.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1990 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has been spending a lot of time on college campuses, speaking carefully in measured tones but pricking sensitive nerves with a message many students do not want to hear. There may be no connection, but he is puffing on cigarettes for the first time in 12 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2008 | Paula L. Woods, Special to The Times
Arguably, there have not been elections in recent memory as closely watched, debated or parsed as the 2008 presidential primaries. The recent string of Obama triumphs and the straits the Clinton campaign finds itself in are reported incessantly on the news, blogged ad nauseam on the Internet, mulled over at the local Starbucks. Pundicrats chew over the candidates' every utterance like sharks over chum.
BOOKS
September 30, 1990 | Charles Johnson, Johnson's latest novel is "Middle Passage." He teaches at the University of Washington.
The summer before Shelby Steele left for Coe College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, in 1964--the same year the Civil Rights Act was passed--he heard Martin Luther King speak in Chicago. "When you are behind in a footrace," he recalls King saying, "the only way to get ahead is to run faster than the man in front of you. So when your white roommate says he's tired and goes to sleep, you stay up and burn the midnight oil."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
Claude Steele, a social psychology expert who is the dean of Stanford University's Graduate School of Education, will become the provost of UC Berkeley, it was announced Monday. UC Berkeley chancellor Nicholas Dirks on Monday announced his appointment of Steele, with whom he worked at Columbia University in the past. Steele's nomination and salary as provost and executive vice chancellor -- the No. 2 job at the UC campus -- will be reviewed by the UC regents at their meeting next week.
MAGAZINE
July 28, 1991 | Ronald Brownstein, Ronald Brownstein is a Times national political correspondent.
These are the years of Willie Horton and Tawana Brawley, of Louis Farrakhan and David Duke, of Rodney King and the Central Park jogger, of quotas and code words, of politics sharpened to a lethal edge on the adamantine differences between black and white. Not since the 1960s have racial questions been so vivid and dense with emotion. Books about the urban underclass are nestled between the self-help manuals on the national best-seller lists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1991
Yeaaah, Janet Clayton! I loved the interview with Steele. She asked all the right questions and made all the right points. Go on, girl! She made my Sunday! ELEANOR BROWN Santa Monica
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1990
The commentary on affirmative action programs by Shelby Steele ("The High Price of Preference," Bookmark, Opinion, Sept. 30) was especially disturbing in that it rehashes the old stereotypical racist view that affirmative action programs promote the hiring of less competent minority workers at the expense of more qualified whites. As a personnel specialist in public sector hiring, I can assure the readers that we are choosing from equally unqualified candidates. JONATHAN DOUWE Los Angeles
BOOKS
October 4, 1998 | JACKSON LEARS, Jackson Lears teaches American cultural history at Rutgers University. He is working on a book about gambling and luck in American history
One evening some 30 years ago, the Smothers Brothers sang "The Lord is Colorblind" to a nationwide television audience. The movement for black equality had not completely passed beyond its early, epic phase; racial integration remained a shining ideal in many Americans' minds. It was a long time ago. Imagine the reactions that song might evoke today--bafflement, embarrassment, derision. We have entered an era when awareness of race seems inescapable, part of the atmosphere we breathe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1991
The subheading on Shelby Steele's article reads "The liberal policy of redress may have aided his development. But self-help put him in the position to benefit." Actually, what put him in the position to benefit was the education he received from schools run by the Catholic Church, another "liberal" operation that worked to reverse the damages caused by racial oppression many decades before affirmative action, and certainly during the time of Clarence Thomas' childhood in Pin Point, Ga. Revealing evidence as to where Shelby Steel is coming from is his use of the word liberal seven times in the last three paragraphs.
MAGAZINE
July 28, 1991 | Ronald Brownstein, Ronald Brownstein is a Times national political correspondent.
These are the years of Willie Horton and Tawana Brawley, of Louis Farrakhan and David Duke, of Rodney King and the Central Park jogger, of quotas and code words, of politics sharpened to a lethal edge on the adamantine differences between black and white. Not since the 1960s have racial questions been so vivid and dense with emotion. Books about the urban underclass are nestled between the self-help manuals on the national best-seller lists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1991
I congratulate you for printing the interview with Steele. Other readers, like myself, must have the utmost respect for Steele the scholar, the man of integrity, who retained his composure so professionally in spite of the blatant, obvious attempts by your interviewer Janet Clayton to put words in his mouth or draw him into expressing views he clearly was rejecting. I am proud of him and of the school that appointed him to its staff. T. BRUCE GRAHAM Port Hueneme
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