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Sheldon Hackney

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2013 | Times wire services
Sheldon Hackney, an educator and historian who served as president of Tulane University and the University of Pennsylvania before becoming chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, has died. He was 79. Hackney died Thursday at his home on Martha's Vineyard of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, officials from Penn and Tulane confirmed. He was president of Tulane from 1975 to 1980 and president of Penn from 1981 to 1993, when he was nominated by President Clinton to serve as chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2013 | Times wire services
Sheldon Hackney, an educator and historian who served as president of Tulane University and the University of Pennsylvania before becoming chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, has died. He was 79. Hackney died Thursday at his home on Martha's Vineyard of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, officials from Penn and Tulane confirmed. He was president of Tulane from 1975 to 1980 and president of Penn from 1981 to 1993, when he was nominated by President Clinton to serve as chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
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OPINION
November 30, 1997 | Ian L. Parker
'A National Conversation," a program launched in 1993 by the National Endowment for the Humanities, is funding community organizations across the county to stimulate a national debate about race and what it means to be an American. Senior-citizens homes, choirs, boys' clubs, parent-teacher associations, newspapers, a tenement museum in New York, the California Council for the Humanities and many other groups have held, so far, a total of 4,000 "conversations."
OPINION
November 30, 1997 | Ian L. Parker
'A National Conversation," a program launched in 1993 by the National Endowment for the Humanities, is funding community organizations across the county to stimulate a national debate about race and what it means to be an American. Senior-citizens homes, choirs, boys' clubs, parent-teacher associations, newspapers, a tenement museum in New York, the California Council for the Humanities and many other groups have held, so far, a total of 4,000 "conversations."
NEWS
June 26, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sheldon Hackney, President Clinton's controversial choice to head the National Endowment for the Humanities, on Friday defended his record as a university president from attacks by critics who have described him as the "pope of political correctness." Acknowledging that he could have handled some campus race issues better, the University of Pennsylvania president nevertheless accused critics of taking his remarks out of context and distorting his role in two controversial incidents.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1993 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Humanities Head: Sheldon Hackney, the University of Pennsylvania's president, will be named to head the National Endowment for the Humanities, an agency official said. Martha Chowning, the agency's liaison to the White House, told the university newspaper that Hackney, 59, will be nominated for the job. The Clinton Administration declined to confirm the report.
NEWS
February 11, 1989 | From Associated Press
Walter H. Annenberg, who sold TV Guide magazine to Rupert Murdoch last year for $3.2 billion, has pledged $10 million to the University of Pennsylvania, it was announced Friday. Sheldon Hackney, president of Annenberg's alma mater, said that the $10 million would go to Penn's history department.
NEWS
August 23, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Clinton helped Martha's Vineyard Hospital raise $54,000 in charitable contributions by playing golf. "Oh no!" he cried when his first shot went awry. "Whoa, Mama!" he shouted on a drive later in the game. Clinton participated in the hospital's eighth annual golf tournament with Washington powerbroker Vernon E. Jordan Jr., who headed Clinton's post-election transition to the White House, as well as Assistant Atty. Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1993 | THOMAS EHRLICH, Thomas Ehrlich, provost at the University of Pennsylvania from 1981 through 1987, is president of Indiana University.
Controversy is nothing new at the National Endowment for the Humanities, but the attacks that University of Pennsylvania President Sheldon Hackney is likely to face as President Clinton's nominee to head the endowment are bound to be misleading and undeserved. Taking a stand for dialogue and decency is a major role of university presidents. Often we find ourselves smack in the middle of a high-decibel war of words.
NEWS
April 23, 1997 | From The Washington Post
Sheldon Hackney, chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, is leaving his post to return to teaching history at the University of Pennsylvania. Hackney, president of Penn for 12 years before coming to Washington in 1993, plans to offer a course on American identity to explore some of the same questions of pluralism that were at the heart of his most visible humanities effort, a program called the National Conversation.
NEWS
June 26, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sheldon Hackney, President Clinton's controversial choice to head the National Endowment for the Humanities, on Friday defended his record as a university president from attacks by critics who have described him as the "pope of political correctness." Acknowledging that he could have handled some campus race issues better, the University of Pennsylvania president nevertheless accused critics of taking his remarks out of context and distorting his role in two controversial incidents.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1993 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Humanities Head: Sheldon Hackney, the University of Pennsylvania's president, will be named to head the National Endowment for the Humanities, an agency official said. Martha Chowning, the agency's liaison to the White House, told the university newspaper that Hackney, 59, will be nominated for the job. The Clinton Administration declined to confirm the report.
NEWS
November 17, 1993 | From The Washington Post
Six months after the University of Pennsylvania charged a white student with racial harassment for calling five black sorority sisters "water buffalo," its new leaders announced Tuesday that they will scrap a controversial code barring racially demeaning speech because it is "not the best solution to the problems of racism in our community." The decision by interim president Claire Faigin and interim provost Marvin Lazerson drew reactions ranging from hope to fury among students at Penn.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1993 | MARK BOUSIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actress Jane Alexander was sworn in Friday as chair of the National Endowment for the Arts, ending a long leadership vacuum at the embattled agency and pledging to use her new podium to promote the NEA's past successes rather than its occasional missteps.
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