Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSheldon Jackson College
IN THE NEWS

Sheldon Jackson College

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
Tim Sagoonick's latest package from home contained dried fish, reindeer sausage and raw whale meat. For Sagoonick, 18, a freshman at Sheldon Jackson College here in Sitka, home is Shaktoolik, a tiny Eskimo village on the Bering Sea's Norton Sound, nearly 2,000 miles away. More than half of the 280 full-time students at Sheldon Jackson College, Alaska's oldest educational institution, are Eskimos and Indians from small remote villages scattered across the nation's largest state.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
Tim Sagoonick's latest package from home contained dried fish, reindeer sausage and raw whale meat. For Sagoonick, 18, a freshman at Sheldon Jackson College here in Sitka, home is Shaktoolik, a tiny Eskimo village on the Bering Sea's Norton Sound, nearly 2,000 miles away. More than half of the 280 full-time students at Sheldon Jackson College, Alaska's oldest educational institution, are Eskimos and Indians from small remote villages scattered across the nation's largest state.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
October 13, 1985 | FRANK RILEY, Riley is travel columnist for Los Angeles magazine and a regular contributor to this section
We are at the midpoint between Asia and North America, a few miles south of the Arctic Circle in a part of the world being rediscovered as a destination for adventure travel unlike any other on this planet. As our World Discoverer expedition ship slowly gets under way in the two-mile-wide strait, the bow is in U.S. waters and the stern is in Soviet waters. A rubber Zodiac boat with its Eskimo crew and one passenger bounces over the waves toward us out of the Little Diomede harbor.
TRAVEL
October 13, 1985 | FRANK RILEY, Riley is travel columnist for Los Angeles magazine and a regular contributor to this section
We are at the midpoint between Asia and North America, a few miles south of the Arctic Circle in a part of the world being rediscovered as a destination for adventure travel unlike any other on this planet. As our World Discoverer expedition ship slowly gets under way in the two-mile-wide strait, the bow is in U.S. waters and the stern is in Soviet waters. A rubber Zodiac boat with its Eskimo crew and one passenger bounces over the waves toward us out of the Little Diomede harbor.
SPORTS
December 28, 1991
A basketball game between Cal State Bakersfield and Sheldon-Jackson College (Alaska) was stopped with 9:44 left in the second half Friday night because of a leaky roof at the Cal State Bakersfield Activities Center. The roof started leaking at halftime when Bakersfield led, 51-18, in the first round of the Bakersfield tournament. Referee Jim Stupin called the game with Bakersfield leading, 77-30, because of excessive water on the floor.
NEWS
December 20, 1990 | GARY KLEIN
Like many people do during the colder months, the Occidental women's basketball team recently retreated to a remote island. The Tigers, however, said aloha to Sitka, Alaska, an island in the southeast part of the state that is home to Sheldon Jackson College, an NAIA school with an enrollment of about 300.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1993 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Around the small Burbank fitness center, Douglas Oliver Kelly was Mr. Helpful--always willing to lend a hand with the equipment or give training tips, particularly to attractive young women. So it was that he met Sara Weir, a shy, devout 19-year-old, new to the city, who had been bitten by the entertainment-industry bug after landing a job as a gofer on the set of a TV sitcom. "So young and innocent," one detective called her.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | CHARLES HILLINGER
It started beyond the power lines in the hills and hollers of West Virginia, in hamlets like Looneyville and Odd. It was my first trip for "Charles Hillinger's America," and at Odd, I visited a teacher from the Long Wanted School, so named because people waited so long for it. I also went to the only place in America where a mountain was made out of a mole hill: Mountain, W. Va., changed its name from Mole Hill in 1949. What an incredible odyssey.
TRAVEL
March 10, 1991 | KITTY BAKER, Baker is a free-lance writer living in Newtown, Pa. and
It was 5 a.m. and the silence of the Alaska Marine Highway on that October morning awakened some passengers on the M/V Matanuska. We must have anchored in Wrangell Narrows, I thought, as a mountain of hemlock and Sitka spruce trees seemed to press up against my starboard porthole. Enjoying the luxury of a comfortable berth, I turned over and went back to sleep. When the steady throb of the 408-foot ferry's twin diesel engines had not restarted two hours later, I wondered if we had gone aground.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|