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Sheldon Jacobs

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May 5, 1998 | RUSS WILES, Russ Wiles is a mutual fund columnist for the Times
Sheldon Jacobs wrote the book on mutual funds--or at least one of the first such books, back in 1974. "Put Money in Your Pocket," a how-to book about no-load (no sales charge) funds, preceded by five years Jacobs' founding of his newsletter, the No-Load Fund Investor, which he has since built into one of the most respected and best-performing fund advisory letters. It's also one of the most complete newsletters devoted to funds, tracking nearly 800 no-load and low-load portfolios.
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BUSINESS
April 6, 1999 | RUSS WILES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The conventional wisdom is to spread your holdings among different types of investments and to include--or maybe stock up on--categories of mutual funds that didn't fare so well in the most recent quarter. The experts at making these allocation decisions are professional advisors who need to tell their clients what funds to buy or are managers of funds that are designed as dynamic allocation vehicles for investors.
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BUSINESS
April 6, 1999 | RUSS WILES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The conventional wisdom is to spread your holdings among different types of investments and to include--or maybe stock up on--categories of mutual funds that didn't fare so well in the most recent quarter. The experts at making these allocation decisions are professional advisors who need to tell their clients what funds to buy or are managers of funds that are designed as dynamic allocation vehicles for investors.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1998 | RUSS WILES, Russ Wiles is a mutual fund columnist for the Times
Sheldon Jacobs wrote the book on mutual funds--or at least one of the first such books, back in 1974. "Put Money in Your Pocket," a how-to book about no-load (no sales charge) funds, preceded by five years Jacobs' founding of his newsletter, the No-Load Fund Investor, which he has since built into one of the most respected and best-performing fund advisory letters. It's also one of the most complete newsletters devoted to funds, tracking nearly 800 no-load and low-load portfolios.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Old-timers, take heart. For every U.S. mutual fund manager in his or her 20s, there's at least one in his or her 50s. That's the conclusion reached Tuesday by researchers at Morningstar Inc., who found that the average age of about 1,000 managers in the firm's database is about 44. "It's a myth that the fund industry is overpopulated with managers in their 20s," said Morningstar analyst Scott Cooley.
NEWS
July 22, 1999 | Bloomberg News
U.S. mutual fund investors are taking a broader view of the market when it comes to buying index funds. Vanguard Group, the leading U.S. manager of index mutual funds, said Wednesday that a rising percentage of new investments is going to funds that track the Wilshire 5,000 index rather than the Standard & Poor's 500. The Wilshire is the broadest U.S. index, covering about 7,400 stocks, while the S&P represents 500 of America's biggest companies.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1998 | RUSS WILES, Russ Wiles is a mutual fund columnist for The Times and coauthor of "How Mutual Funds Work" (Simon & Schuster). He can be reached at russ.wiles@pni.com
Marcus Singleton put $2,500 in Twentieth Century Giftrust for each of four grandchildren a few years ago. But for his fifth grandchild, now 3 months old, he plans to invest in another mutual fund, possibly the SteinRoe Young Investor fund. "In the beginning, I remember thinking what a wonderful fund Giftrust was," said Singleton, a retired aerospace engineer who lives in Pacific Palisades. "But now I think I'm going to change horses." You can't blame him.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1998 | From Reuters
Investors put an estimated $27.5 billion into U.S. stock mutual funds in March, topping the $24.2 billion invested in February, the Investment Company Institute said Thursday. "That is phenomenal and the amount is way up over the preceding March," mutual fund analyst Sheldon Jacobs said. "Investors are generally bullish, there have been no meaningful market corrections and money continues to pour in." In March 1997, domestic equity funds took in $9.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1998 | JOSH FRIEDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you're thinking about making your first mutual fund purchase but don't have a lot of money to get started, an automatic investment plan could be worth considering. With the major stock indexes at or near record highs, these gradual plans offer newcomers and experienced investors alike one of the biggest advantages of dollar cost averaging: protection from jumping in all at once just as the market peaks.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1994 | From Reuters
In recent years, mutual fund managers have taken on celebrity status among investors. But a recent study questions whether fund managers actually matter. The most obvious example of a celebrity fund manager is Peter Lynch, who managed Fidelity's giant Magellan Fund for 13 years before his retirement in 1990. Even now, Lynch remains a familiar fixture in the financial press.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1994 | CHET CURRIER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In contrast to the dramatic entrances sometimes enjoyed by new issues in the stock market, most new mutual funds make their debuts quietly. Even the most ambitious stock funds arrive on the scene lacking a key attribute for star status--a performance record. And since funds' values are determined by the worth of their portfolios, rather than open bidding by buyers and sellers, they can't soar in their first hours of availability the way a hot new stock can.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1997 | TIM QUINSON, Tim Quinson writes for Bloomberg News
U.S. mutual fund companies like Fidelity Investments and Aim Management Group are known for handing billion-dollar portfolios to managers barely in their 30s. Sometimes they're even younger. Fidelity Investments recently picked Erin Sullivan, 27, to manage its $1.68-billion Emerging Growth Fund. Bob Kippes, 31, manages Aim's $2.4-billion Aggressive Growth Fund. "These examples are more the exception than the rule," said Richard Lannamann, managing director at Russell Reynolds Associates Inc.
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