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Sheldon Leonard

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1997 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Sheldon Leonard, who went from playing movie gangsters to directing and producing such TV hits as "The Andy Griffith Show" and "I Spy," died Saturday at his Beverly Hills home. He was 89. Leonard died from natural causes, his family said. Leonard played underworld figures in the 1940s and 1950s, helping to create the stereotypical film gangster in scores of support roles in which he talked out of the side of his mouth with a voice that resonated his New York City background.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1997
Re "TV Producer Sheldon Leonard Dies," Jan. 12: I had the privilege of coming to know Sheldon Leonard as his producing partner on what would prove to be his last film, "I Spy Returns." Though I am of a younger generation than his contemporaries, I recognized and respected him as truly the consummate professional of our industry: actor, writer, director, producer, and, perhaps most importantly, mentor. He was demanding in creativity, and demanding in business. He was smart, funny, enormously well-read and a gentleman of exquisite taste.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1997
Re "TV Producer Sheldon Leonard Dies," Jan. 12: I had the privilege of coming to know Sheldon Leonard as his producing partner on what would prove to be his last film, "I Spy Returns." Though I am of a younger generation than his contemporaries, I recognized and respected him as truly the consummate professional of our industry: actor, writer, director, producer, and, perhaps most importantly, mentor. He was demanding in creativity, and demanding in business. He was smart, funny, enormously well-read and a gentleman of exquisite taste.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1997 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Sheldon Leonard, who went from playing movie gangsters to directing and producing such TV hits as "The Andy Griffith Show" and "I Spy," died Saturday at his Beverly Hills home. He was 89. Leonard died from natural causes, his family said. Leonard played underworld figures in the 1940s and 1950s, helping to create the stereotypical film gangster in scores of support roles in which he talked out of the side of his mouth with a voice that resonated his New York City background.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Warner Bros. will pay tribute to Mel Blanc, the "man of a thousand voices," at an invitation-only program Tuesday afternoon. Blanc, who died July 10 at the age of 81, created and performed the voices of such Warner cartoon characters as Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig and Daffy Duck, among scores of others. Speakers will include Blanc's son Noel, Kirk Douglas, Walter Matthau, Gary Owens, Sheldon Leonard, animation director Fritz Freleng and voice performer June Foray.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Video Legends: Six more television "legends" have been selected by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences for induction into the academy's Hall of Fame: Bill Cosby, Andy Griffith, Ted Koppel, Sheldon Leonard, Dinah Shore and R. E. (Ted) Turner. Their names were announced in Orlando, Fla., where the academy also revealed that the Disney-MGM Studios there will be the site of the East Coast home of the Television Academy Hall of Fame Plaza.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2002
AS Howard Cosell used to say, Jon Burlingame told it like it was ("Spy Films Lose Heart," Nov. 5). Today's Hollywood seems to be under the impression that cynicism equals cool. The characters of the classic spy series of the '60s, like "I Spy" and "Wild Wild West," were everything that their film counterparts are not: They were caring, charismatic, held high moral values, did not denigrate each other and were tender, yet tough as nails. This is one reason why these series will always be treasured in many people's hearts, whereas the remakes will find a quick detour into our mental and emotional trash bin. Rommel Gonzalez Norwalk KENNETH Turan enumerates many reasons why the producers of the big-screen version of "I Spy" missed the mark (" 'I Spy': Mission Implausible," Nov. 1)
NEWS
July 23, 1990 | BILL HIGGINS
Danny Thomas and St. Jude are partners in the patron business. The 1st-Century saint is patron of hopeless causes, while Thomas has been patron to the hospital bearing the saint's name. "I made a vow to St. Jude," Thomas said, speaking at the Century Plaza Saturday night. "I . . . said, 'Hey, I hear you're the patron of the hopeless. I'm young. Help me find my way in life and I'll build you a shrine.' Ten days later I got a couple jobs. That led to . . .
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