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Sheldon Teitelbaum

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MAGAZINE
November 29, 1992
In the "Palm Latitudes" item "But Is Paul Really Dead?" (by Sheldon Teitelbaum, Oct. 25) it is reported that among early recorded versions of the song "Louie Louie" was one by the Whalers. Well, you got it right phonetically, but the band was actually the Wailers, one of several rock bands of the late '50s and early '60s to come out of the Seattle-Tacoma music scene. BOB BLACKBURN Hollywood
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MAGAZINE
November 29, 1992
In the "Palm Latitudes" item "But Is Paul Really Dead?" (by Sheldon Teitelbaum, Oct. 25) it is reported that among early recorded versions of the song "Louie Louie" was one by the Whalers. Well, you got it right phonetically, but the band was actually the Wailers, one of several rock bands of the late '50s and early '60s to come out of the Seattle-Tacoma music scene. BOB BLACKBURN Hollywood
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MAGAZINE
May 10, 1992
I've become used to friends asking "Who?" when I mention my favorite singer/songwriter/poet/author ("Leonard Cohen, Pain Free," by Sheldon Teitelbaum, April 5). Now that Cohen's genius is being recognized by the mainstream, I'm not sure I'm ready to share him. After all, I always thought he was singing just for me. CYNTHIA RAYVIS Hermosa Beach
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Teitelbaum is a frequent contributor to The Times.
When the riot broke out in Los Angeles on April 29, Ballantine Books publicity director Carol Fass was at a sales conference in Arizona. As she and her colleagues watched events unfold on television, one recalled the company had a title on backlist, "Black Protest: History, Documents and Analysis," a book that was published in 1965, reissued 16 times and was currently in storage. It might be an opportune time to move it back into bookstores.
NEWS
April 19, 1992
I wish to thank Sheldon Teitelbaum for his Isaac Asimov eulogy ("Scientists Say Asimov Put the Stars in Their Eyes," April 8). Teitelbaum assuaged my grief by reminding me that I was not alone. Much greater minds than mine will miss him. I, too, felt Asimov was an even greater science journalist than a science fiction writer. He taught me everything I wanted to learn about from atoms to zygotes, I never had the honor to meet him, but I will greatly mourn the death of my greatest teacher.
MAGAZINE
May 3, 1992
I was outraged to see Sheldon Teitelbaum's article on X-rated Japanimation ("Melting Pot," Palm Latitudes, March 29). As an anime fan, I can state with confidence that soft-porn, sexually explicit series such as Urotsuko-Doji and Cream Lemon represent an extremely small percentage of the hundreds of Japanimation films available. It's hardly fair to place a label on an entire genre because of a few less-than-innocent examples. Animation is not just for children anymore. CASEY CARTER Torrance
MAGAZINE
June 16, 1991
Regarding "Trekking to the Top," by Sheldon Teitelbaum (May 5): I was not a Trekkie. I am not a Trekker. I have a life. I watch "Star Trek: The Next Generation" because it often sports excellent writing, its ensemble acting is better than anything else on the tube without the name Bochco in the credits, and its technical wizardry is dazzling fun. But I also watch because, to quote a close friend, "If the future isn't like this, it ought to...
MAGAZINE
March 22, 1992
Sheldon Teitelbaum's piece "Over There" (Palm Latitudes, Feb. 9) was arrogant and insulting. If the purpose was to criticize the movie "JFK," why did the author need to ridicule an entire nation, Yugoslavia, even as it experiences a civil war? According to the writer, terrible wars usually start in small countries where people are so primitive that they love making up abstract enemies who plot against them. Does Teitelbaum consider the fighting in World War I and II as only a bad movie?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1987
Sheldon Teitelbaum's article on "Flowers in the Attic" indicates an unprofessional and uninformed knowledge of contemporary film production (Outtakes, Nov. 15). Since the beginning of the film-making process, producers have previewed their films and today practically all films are subjected to in-depth preview evaluation so that general audience reaction to a film can be clearly established. To give the impression that "Flowers" is a flawed film because we took out the overt incest and made other changes is unfair.
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Teitelbaum is a frequent contributor to The Times.
When the riot broke out in Los Angeles on April 29, Ballantine Books publicity director Carol Fass was at a sales conference in Arizona. As she and her colleagues watched events unfold on television, one recalled the company had a title on backlist, "Black Protest: History, Documents and Analysis," a book that was published in 1965, reissued 16 times and was currently in storage. It might be an opportune time to move it back into bookstores.
MAGAZINE
May 10, 1992
I've become used to friends asking "Who?" when I mention my favorite singer/songwriter/poet/author ("Leonard Cohen, Pain Free," by Sheldon Teitelbaum, April 5). Now that Cohen's genius is being recognized by the mainstream, I'm not sure I'm ready to share him. After all, I always thought he was singing just for me. CYNTHIA RAYVIS Hermosa Beach
MAGAZINE
May 3, 1992
I was outraged to see Sheldon Teitelbaum's article on X-rated Japanimation ("Melting Pot," Palm Latitudes, March 29). As an anime fan, I can state with confidence that soft-porn, sexually explicit series such as Urotsuko-Doji and Cream Lemon represent an extremely small percentage of the hundreds of Japanimation films available. It's hardly fair to place a label on an entire genre because of a few less-than-innocent examples. Animation is not just for children anymore. CASEY CARTER Torrance
NEWS
April 19, 1992
I wish to thank Sheldon Teitelbaum for his Isaac Asimov eulogy ("Scientists Say Asimov Put the Stars in Their Eyes," April 8). Teitelbaum assuaged my grief by reminding me that I was not alone. Much greater minds than mine will miss him. I, too, felt Asimov was an even greater science journalist than a science fiction writer. He taught me everything I wanted to learn about from atoms to zygotes, I never had the honor to meet him, but I will greatly mourn the death of my greatest teacher.
MAGAZINE
March 22, 1992
Sheldon Teitelbaum's piece "Over There" (Palm Latitudes, Feb. 9) was arrogant and insulting. If the purpose was to criticize the movie "JFK," why did the author need to ridicule an entire nation, Yugoslavia, even as it experiences a civil war? According to the writer, terrible wars usually start in small countries where people are so primitive that they love making up abstract enemies who plot against them. Does Teitelbaum consider the fighting in World War I and II as only a bad movie?
MAGAZINE
June 16, 1991
Regarding "Trekking to the Top," by Sheldon Teitelbaum (May 5): I was not a Trekkie. I am not a Trekker. I have a life. I watch "Star Trek: The Next Generation" because it often sports excellent writing, its ensemble acting is better than anything else on the tube without the name Bochco in the credits, and its technical wizardry is dazzling fun. But I also watch because, to quote a close friend, "If the future isn't like this, it ought to...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1987
Sheldon Teitelbaum's article on "Flowers in the Attic" indicates an unprofessional and uninformed knowledge of contemporary film production (Outtakes, Nov. 15). Since the beginning of the film-making process, producers have previewed their films and today practically all films are subjected to in-depth preview evaluation so that general audience reaction to a film can be clearly established. To give the impression that "Flowers" is a flawed film because we took out the overt incest and made other changes is unfair.
BOOKS
May 20, 1990
Bart Kosko ("Making Everything Perfectly Fuzzy," by Sheldon Teitelbaum, April 1) claims that "fuzziness refutes the traditional Aristotelian theory of absolutes" and that the Law of the Excluded Middle allows "no shades of gray, no concepts such as 'partly' or 'mostly.' " The Law of the Excluded Middle states that "the same attribute cannot at the same time belong and not belong to the same subject and in the same respect."
NEWS
September 15, 1989
Regarding "A Marketplace of African Authenticity" (by Sheldon Teitelbaum, Aug. 19): I was dismayed by his reference to Southern California's "thriving white South African community" who, for "obvious political reasons, have not been asked to attend." As a fourth-generation white South African who felt compelled to leave South Africa for "obvious political reasons," I was deeply saddened by the inference that all white South Africans are collectively and irrevocably guilty and therefore unworthy of sharing in African pride and the celebration of African culture.
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