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Shelley Moore

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1990 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Standards, the common language of jazz, allow musicians thoroughly unacquainted with each other to tap a shared consciousness, no matter how little rehearsal they've had. They also provide a touchstone for the listener, something familiar that invites comparison against past performances. Giving them a fresh face isn't very easy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's an element of excitement in live performances that most often is missing from studio recordings. But when singer Shelley Moore played Spaghettini on Sunday to celebrate the release of her new Cexton CD "Moore Moods," the tables were turned for a while. The excitement of appearing in front of a packed house proved a little much for the usually confident vocalist.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's an element of excitement in live performances that most often is missing from studio recordings. But when singer Shelley Moore played Spaghettini on Sunday to celebrate the release of her new Cexton CD "Moore Moods," the tables were turned for a while. The excitement of appearing in front of a packed house proved a little much for the usually confident vocalist.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For many years, life for Shelley Moore was a song. "I always sang," the English expatriate said recently from her home in Westminster. "Even when I was very tiny. I can't remember ever not singing; ever." And singing was good to Moore during those years as she performed on British radio and television, traveled with some well-known bands, immigrated to the United States and began recording in this country. But then her life became more than singing.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For many years, life for Shelley Moore was a song. "I always sang," the English expatriate said recently from her home in Westminster. "Even when I was very tiny. I can't remember ever not singing; ever." And singing was good to Moore during those years as she performed on British radio and television, traveled with some well-known bands, immigrated to the United States and began recording in this country. But then her life became more than singing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1987 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
Jazz has found a new home in Orange County in the unlikely confines of a British-themed restaurant in Westminster that specializes in continental cuisine. The Court of St. James, formerly Victoria Station, has been refurbished and will begin nightly jazz bookings tonight, starting with vocalist Shelley Moore and the Gerard Hagen Four. Also due at the Court of St. James this week are guitar duo George Van Eps and Tony Rizzi, singer Stephanie Haynes and the New York Jazz Connection quartet.
NEWS
January 11, 2013 | By Paul West
WASHINGTON -- Facing the prospect of a tough reelection fight, veteran West Virginia Sen. Jay Rockefeller, 75, announced Friday that he will leave the Senate when his current term ends. His decision makes him the first senator in either party whose term expires after next year to make a retirement announcement. Rockefeller said at a ceremony in Charleston, the state capital, that after nearly “50 years of public service in West Virginia, I've decided that 2014 will be the right moment for me to find new ways to fight for the causes I believe in and to spend more time with my incredible family.”  Tall and soft-spoken, the moderate Rockefeller would have faced a highly competitive reelection contest had he decided to seek a sixth six-year term.
NATIONAL
December 7, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Two Republican House members resigned Thursday from the board supervising teenage pages, accusing a Democratic appointee of failing to inform them about sexual and criminal activity by at least four youngsters. The board's chairman, Rep. Dale E. Kildee (D-Mich.), supported the Republicans, blaming House Clerk Lorraine C. Miller -- the day-to-day administrator of the page program -- for failing to immediately notify page board members of all the inappropriate conduct.
NATIONAL
May 31, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A convicted lobbyist described Tuesday how he obtained insider information and advice from Bush administration procurement chief David Safavian to advance two projects for Republican influence-peddler Jack Abramoff, who then took the official on a lavish golf trip to Scotland. Neil Volz, a partner of Abramoff's at the time, also outlined in U.S. District Court how the Abramoff team received assistance from several Republican congressmen or their aides, including Reps.
NATIONAL
July 9, 2010 | Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
West Virginia's attorney general said in a legal opinion issued Thursday that Gov. Joe Manchin III had the authority to call a special election in November to fill the seat of the late Sen. Robert C. Byrd, clearing the way for Manchin to appoint a temporary replacement. The ruling by Atty. Gen. Darrell McGraw also enables Manchin, a Democrat, to declare his candidacy for the Senate seat. Byrd died June 28 and was the longest-serving member in the history of Congress. McGraw's finding was issued a day after Manchin requested a formal ruling on whether he could order a special election to fill the seat.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1990 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Standards, the common language of jazz, allow musicians thoroughly unacquainted with each other to tap a shared consciousness, no matter how little rehearsal they've had. They also provide a touchstone for the listener, something familiar that invites comparison against past performances. Giving them a fresh face isn't very easy.
NATIONAL
June 21, 2012 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- The EPA says it does not fly drones over the heartland to spy on farmers. It does, however, use manned aircraft to enforce anti-pollution laws. And that's a practice that a group of farm-state lawmakers want to stop. Rep. Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.) has introduced the Farmer's Privacy Act to sharply restrict the Environmental Protection Agency's  use of "aerial surveillance" of farms and ranches -- the latest shot at an agency that congressional Republicans consider a symbol of Washington's regulatory overreach.
NATIONAL
January 20, 2007 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
Four months after the congressional page scandal rocked Capitol Hill and helped dash Republican hopes for holding their majorities in Congress, the House voted unanimously Friday to expand the board that oversees the teenage interns and require that it meet regularly. The House voted 416 to 0 to reorganize the House Page Board so that it has two congressional members from each party, the House clerk, the sergeant at arms, one parent of a page and one former page.
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