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Shelley Morrison

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Actress Shelley Morrison, who plays the maid Rosario Salazar on the television situation comedy "Will & Grace," has been arrested on suspicion of felony shoplifting, Los Angeles police said Friday. Morrison, 66, was booked under the name Rachel Dominguez and released after she posted $20,000 bail, Officer Don Cox said. The theft allegedly occurred Wednesday at Robinsons-May in the Westside Pavilion on Pico Boulevard at Overland Avenue, Cox said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Actress Shelley Morrison, who plays the maid Rosario Salazar on the television situation comedy "Will & Grace," has been arrested on suspicion of felony shoplifting, Los Angeles police said Friday. Morrison, 66, was booked under the name Rachel Dominguez and released after she posted $20,000 bail, Officer Don Cox said. The theft allegedly occurred Wednesday at Robinsons-May in the Westside Pavilion on Pico Boulevard at Overland Avenue, Cox said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Actress Shelley Morrison, who plays a housekeeper on NBC's comedy "Will & Grace," was charged with misdemeanor grand theft Tuesday for allegedly trying to shoplift jewelry from a West Los Angeles department store. Morrison was arrested April 23 after surveillance cameras filmed her allegedly trying to steal jewelry worth about $450 from the Robinsons-May store in the West Coast Pavilion, said Frank Mateljan, a spokesman for the city attorney's office. That office will prosecute the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1994
Freedom of speech. We here in the United States have fought and died for the privilege of freedom of speech. That freedom does not extend to yelling "Fire!" when there is no fire in a crowded place. Yet Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) is allowed to say whatever comes out of his mouth regardless of the impact it may have on others (Nov. 23). This time he has gone too far. To threaten the President is to threaten us all. How dare he! To think that he might be heading the Foreign Relations Committee is an affront to any of us who has lost a loved one in past conflicts defending our freedoms.
SPORTS
September 13, 1992 | DAVID COULSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For 16 years, Ventura High had played the perfect host in the Ventura Invitational volleyball tournament, always allowing another team to leave with the championship trophy. That changed in the 17th edition of the event Saturday when the Cougars outlasted Nordhoff, 17-15, in the final. Led by junior middle blocker Jesaca Lepper with eight kills and one block, Ventura rebounded from deficits of 5-0, 10-6 and 15-14. The Cougars had blasted Saugus, 15-8, in the semifinals.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2000 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Screen Actors Guild on Wednesday released the second, more detailed volume of a study on race in Hollywood that contained a discouraging assessment and a stinging comment by an executive on the efforts last year to level the playing field for minorities. Even though the national Latino population has increased five times since 1970, the share of jobs available to its professional actors remains at 2%.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2004 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"Between the Lines" is a frustratingly uneven documentary miniseries from A&E that uses various sorts of written communication as a hook to present a collection of mostly unrelated segments that on the whole replicate the ruling aesthetic of A&E -- a network that dresses itself like a cousin to PBS, but which is largely taken up with old cop shows and various packages of true-crime sensationalism and human-interest goo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2002 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's elbow to elbow celebrities at La Knitterie Parisienne, an internationally known knitting boutique in Studio City that's become a refuge for actors, agents, directors and producers. On a recent afternoon, "Ally McBeal" newcomer Julianne Nicholson hunts for a seat, squeezing in next to comedic actor Antoinette Spolar-Levine.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2004 | Noel Holston, Newsday
Television has a long and rarely illustrious history of series in which a resourceful, lippy housekeeper, nanny, butler or maid is all that's keeping a family of well-to-do incompetents from collapsing into a pathetic mess. From "Beulah" to "Benson" to "Mr. Belvedere," servants have known best.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2004 | Mark Arax, Times Staff Writer
The letters from Southern California began arriving at the Chaffee Zoo a few days after Christmas. From San Pedro, Burbank, Studio City, Hollywood, West Covina, Riverside and San Diego, people were answering a 9-year-old girl's call to help save the zoo. Tucked inside each letter was a donation -- from $1 to $100 dollars -- and a tribute to Angel Arellano, the Fresno fourth-grader who had highlighted the zoo's hard times by donating $1 on Thanksgiving Day.
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