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Shelley Winters

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2006 | Claudia Luther, Special to The Times
Shelley Winters, a blond bombshell of the 1940s who evolved into a character actress best remembered for her roles as victims, shrews and matrons, died Saturday. She was 85. Winters, the first actress to win two Oscars in the best supporting category, died of heart failure at the Rehabilitation Centre of Beverly Hills, her publicist, Dale Olson, said. She was hospitalized in October after suffering a heart attack.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
What would we do without Shelley Jackson ? A decade or so ago, she launched her project “Skin” -  a story told entirely in tattoos, nearly 2,100 of them, etched on the bodies of volunteers she fondly calls "words. " The idea was to create a work of living literature, one that would change, and ultimately disappear, as its participants died, highlighting the ephemeral nature of, well, everything. “Writers have this great obsession,” she told me at the time , “to create an immortal work.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1995 | James Grant, James Grant is an occasional contributor to Calendar
It's Friday, and Shelley Winters is craving red meat. Lying on a daybed in the cluttered living room of her Spanish-style Beverly Hills duplex, the 72-year-old two-time Oscar winner is chatting on the phone. "I'm sorry about last night," she purrs to an anonymous friend. "Wanna come over for lamb chops?" Then comes the kvetching. "I'm just soooo tired," she moans after hanging up the phone. She is lounging in a bright red, blue and green muumuu and wears no makeup.
NEWS
January 11, 2011
Here's a look at four fascinating film matriarchs and the actresses who admire them "Lolita" (1962) The magnificent mom: Blowsy and deluded, Charlotte Haze (Shelley Winters) didn't realize she was raising the archetypical jailbait ? and lost her daughter to an obsessed older man. Seal of approval: "Shelley Winters was brilliant ? she brought a subtle edge to that role, which became both terrifying and touching. " ? Sally Hawkins ("Made in Dagenham") "Tootsie" (1982)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1990 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Watching Shelley Winters in "Touch of a Stranger" (AMC Century 14), is a bit like seeing strong liquor poured into a tissue paper cup and then trying to get a sip before it explodes or dissolves. Winters pours out heart and guts in a role that's a pale, blowzy pastiche of everything she has done before--a sort of Shelley-shally. Her role as the reclusive Lily isn't real, despite all Winters' efforts.
BOOKS
October 22, 2000 | LAURIE STONE, Laurie Stone is the author, most recently, of "Close to the Bone" and "Laughing in the Dark."
Liz Smith is good for the rabble. For more than 50 years, in columns in the New York Daily News and Newsday, among other venues, she has served dish about the rich and powerful, people who think that money can protect their privacy. The rabble have never had their privacy protected. Family fights, keeping too many cats, letting dirty laundry pile up and engaging in orgies go into files if you're poor and have to deal with agencies. So Liz levels the playing field.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
What would we do without Shelley Jackson ? A decade or so ago, she launched her project “Skin” -  a story told entirely in tattoos, nearly 2,100 of them, etched on the bodies of volunteers she fondly calls "words. " The idea was to create a work of living literature, one that would change, and ultimately disappear, as its participants died, highlighting the ephemeral nature of, well, everything. “Writers have this great obsession,” she told me at the time , “to create an immortal work.
NEWS
January 11, 2011
Here's a look at four fascinating film matriarchs and the actresses who admire them "Lolita" (1962) The magnificent mom: Blowsy and deluded, Charlotte Haze (Shelley Winters) didn't realize she was raising the archetypical jailbait ? and lost her daughter to an obsessed older man. Seal of approval: "Shelley Winters was brilliant ? she brought a subtle edge to that role, which became both terrifying and touching. " ? Sally Hawkins ("Made in Dagenham") "Tootsie" (1982)
NEWS
January 17, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Cinematheque's "Grand Master: The Films of Stanley Kubrick" continues at the Egyptian tonight at 7:30 with the presentation of "Lolita" (1962). When Kubrick brought the controversial Vladimir Nabokov novel to the screen, he cast 15-year-old newcomer Sue Lyon in the title role without specifying her age, which in the book was only 12.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2006 | Claudia Luther, Special to The Times
Shelley Winters, a blond bombshell of the 1940s who evolved into a character actress best remembered for her roles as victims, shrews and matrons, died Saturday. She was 85. Winters, the first actress to win two Oscars in the best supporting category, died of heart failure at the Rehabilitation Centre of Beverly Hills, her publicist, Dale Olson, said. She was hospitalized in October after suffering a heart attack.
NEWS
January 17, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Cinematheque's "Grand Master: The Films of Stanley Kubrick" continues at the Egyptian tonight at 7:30 with the presentation of "Lolita" (1962). When Kubrick brought the controversial Vladimir Nabokov novel to the screen, he cast 15-year-old newcomer Sue Lyon in the title role without specifying her age, which in the book was only 12.
BOOKS
October 22, 2000 | LAURIE STONE, Laurie Stone is the author, most recently, of "Close to the Bone" and "Laughing in the Dark."
Liz Smith is good for the rabble. For more than 50 years, in columns in the New York Daily News and Newsday, among other venues, she has served dish about the rich and powerful, people who think that money can protect their privacy. The rabble have never had their privacy protected. Family fights, keeping too many cats, letting dirty laundry pile up and engaging in orgies go into files if you're poor and have to deal with agencies. So Liz levels the playing field.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1995 | James Grant, James Grant is an occasional contributor to Calendar
It's Friday, and Shelley Winters is craving red meat. Lying on a daybed in the cluttered living room of her Spanish-style Beverly Hills duplex, the 72-year-old two-time Oscar winner is chatting on the phone. "I'm sorry about last night," she purrs to an anonymous friend. "Wanna come over for lamb chops?" Then comes the kvetching. "I'm just soooo tired," she moans after hanging up the phone. She is lounging in a bright red, blue and green muumuu and wears no makeup.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1990 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Watching Shelley Winters in "Touch of a Stranger" (AMC Century 14), is a bit like seeing strong liquor poured into a tissue paper cup and then trying to get a sip before it explodes or dissolves. Winters pours out heart and guts in a role that's a pale, blowzy pastiche of everything she has done before--a sort of Shelley-shally. Her role as the reclusive Lily isn't real, despite all Winters' efforts.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1987 | SANDRA HANSEN KONTE, Konte is a San Francisco journalist
I can't wait until I'm 45 and get all those great parts. --Elizabeth Hartman, in a 1971 interview. The first reports of 43-year-old Elizabeth Hartman's June 10 suicide here were sketchy. Homicide detectives weren't sure just who the slight woman was who had thrown herself from the fifth-story window of her efficiency apartment. A handful of neighbors volunteered what they knew. She was an unemployed actress, they thought, who had starred long ago in some movie with Sidney Poitier.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1993 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Now Here's the Lineup: Corbin Bernsen, Beau Bridges, John Lithgow, Shelley Winters and European filmmaker Bertrand Tavernier are among those scheduled to appear for the eighth annual Santa Barbara International Film Festival, which is expanding this year's "Evenings With" program from three nights to five. The March 5-14 festival will honor Winters' 50 years in the movies with a special salute, including a screening of her 1962 film "Lolita."
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