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SCIENCE
January 11, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
The California Coastal Commission has approved development of the first shellfish ranch in federal waters, a 100-acre underwater plot for cultivating and harvesting about 2.6 million pounds of Mediterranean mussels a year. “It's quite an achievement and I'm pretty happy about it,” Philip Cruver, president and director of Catalina Sea Ranch, said about the commission's unanimous vote Wednesday. “But I always knew it would happen because of the demand.” Catalina Sea Ranch's business strategy is in line with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's aim to create jobs, provide highly nutritional food and improve the marine environment by putting more shellfish back in U.S. waters.
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FOOD
February 19, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
From the legendary Quintarelli estate in Valpolicella, here's a lovely and surprising white wine scented with white peaches and lime. With its minerality and bright acidity, this could be the Veneto's analogue to Grüner Veltliner. Perfect for impressing a wine geek. It's terrific with oysters and chilled shrimp, and a great choice with a frittata or omelet. It works with asparagus too. And, of course, it would be ideal with sushi and Thai food. Region: Valpolicella, Veneto, Italy Price: $38 to $40 Style: Crisp and minerally What it goes with: Chilled shellfish, omelet and frittata, sushi, Thai food Where to find it: John and Pete's Fine Wines & Spirits in West Hollywood, (310)
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SCIENCE
June 18, 2013 | By Brad Balukjian, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
The development of art, culture, and advanced cognitive ability that define modern humans may not have evolved until 50,000 years ago, according to a new study published online Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Richard Klein of Stanford University, the senior author of the study , believes that modern humans evolved at the same time that they left Africa to populate Eurasia and the rest of the world. According to his theory, the cultural innovations led to an increase in fitness for the fledgling human species, spurring a major population expansion.
SCIENCE
January 11, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
The California Coastal Commission has approved development of the first shellfish ranch in federal waters, a 100-acre underwater plot for cultivating and harvesting about 2.6 million pounds of Mediterranean mussels a year. “It's quite an achievement and I'm pretty happy about it,” Philip Cruver, president and director of Catalina Sea Ranch, said about the commission's unanimous vote Wednesday. “But I always knew it would happen because of the demand.” Catalina Sea Ranch's business strategy is in line with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's aim to create jobs, provide highly nutritional food and improve the marine environment by putting more shellfish back in U.S. waters.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2013 | By David Pierson
China has blocked imports of shellfish harvested from the U.S. West Coast over reports of arsenic and toxins found in geoduck clams. The shellfish are believed to have originated from waters off Washington or Alaska, according to KUOW public radio. “They've never done anything like that, where they would not allow shellfish from this entire area based on potentially two areas or maybe just one area. We don't really know yet,” Jerry Borchert of the Washington Department of Health told the Seattle-based KUOW.
NEWS
November 22, 1991 | Associated Press
Oregon coastal bays were reopened to harvesting of some shellfish Thursday after state health officials found that oysters, bay clams and mussels were not contaminated with a potentially deadly neurotoxin. However, the harvest of wild mussels and razor clams remained closed on the Oregon coast. Deborah Cannon, shellfish program specialist for the Oregon Health Division, said several illnesses were linked to contaminated razor clams from Long Beach, Wash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1996 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
The Orange County Health Care Agency is reminding mollusk lovers that a state quarantine on the shellfish begins Wednesday and continues through Oct. 31. Sport harvesting of mussels for consumption is prohibited along the entire California coastline, said Robert Merryman, Orange County's director of environmental health. The purpose of the quarantine is to protect the public from deadly poisons that may be present in bivalve mollusks such as mussels, clams, oysters and scallops, Merryman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
On a recent sunny morning off Long Beach, Philip Cruver throttled down his boat at the spot where his company expects to develop the first shellfish ranch in federal waters. "Our goal is to show this can be done and put a dent in the nation's $10.4-billion seafood deficit," Long Beach entrepreneur Cruver, 67, explained from the deck of his 27-foot vessel. If all goes according to plan, construction of a pilot 100-acre underwater plot will begin early next year, with the first harvest of a half a million pounds of plump Mediterranean mussels and 500,000 Pacific oysters expected about eight months later.
NEWS
September 21, 1989
The worst toxic contamination since 1980 has forced a quarantine of non-commercial harvesting of shellfish on the coastline of Del Norte, Humboldt and Mendocino counties. State Health Director Kenneth Kizer said mussel samples from the area had potentially life-threatening levels of the toxin that causes paralytic shellfish poisoning. He said toxin levels were the highest since paralytic shellfish poisoning was blamed for two deaths in 1980.
NEWS
April 6, 1999 | Associated Press
In a victory for Washington tribes, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday affirmed their right to harvest shellfish on private beaches. The decision stunned private property owners. The court rejected without comment an appeal of a lower-court ruling that upheld the tribes' shellfish rights. State officials, shellfish growers and private property owners had challenged the decision, contending that Indians' 19th-century treaties give them no legal claim to shellfish on private property.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2013 | By David Pierson
China has blocked imports of shellfish harvested from the U.S. West Coast over reports of arsenic and toxins found in geoduck clams. The shellfish are believed to have originated from waters off Washington or Alaska, according to KUOW public radio. “They've never done anything like that, where they would not allow shellfish from this entire area based on potentially two areas or maybe just one area. We don't really know yet,” Jerry Borchert of the Washington Department of Health told the Seattle-based KUOW.
FOOD
November 2, 2013 | By Michael Cimarusti
A pristine oyster on the half shell, unadorned, fresh, cold and briny, is a near-perfect thing. A properly shucked littleneck clam, alone, or with a drop or two of lemon and Tabasco, will make you say mmmm, every time. But just because these shellfish are so good raw doesn't mean we shouldn't cook them too. Properly cooked shellfish is a wonderful thing. The cooking intensifies and transforms the flavor. Oysters especially change completely when cooked, seeming rich and fatty in the best way, while in the raw state they are anything but. You've got to be careful when cooking either type of shellfish, though.
SCIENCE
June 18, 2013 | By Brad Balukjian, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
The development of art, culture, and advanced cognitive ability that define modern humans may not have evolved until 50,000 years ago, according to a new study published online Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Richard Klein of Stanford University, the senior author of the study , believes that modern humans evolved at the same time that they left Africa to populate Eurasia and the rest of the world. According to his theory, the cultural innovations led to an increase in fitness for the fledgling human species, spurring a major population expansion.
NEWS
May 22, 2013 | By Caitlin Keller
'The Adobo Road': Food-blogger-turned-cookbook-author Marvin Gapultos will be celebrating the launch of " The Adobo Road Cookbook ," a Filipino food journey, on Thursday at Max's of Manila in Industry. The event, which starts at 6 p.m., will include a book signing, a talk led by Gapultos and food featured in the book. www.burntlumpiablog.com . Suds & Shellfish: Catch restaurant in Santa Monica is hosting a one-day-only seafood fest called "Suds & Shellfish" on June 2 from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. The four-course menu will feature Maryland soft-shell crab rolls, Louisiana shrimp, Santa Barbara prawns and more.
FOOD
April 13, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times
  For anyone who loves a leaner, more elegant style of Chardonnay, this is the one. Liquid Farm proprietors Nikki and Jeff Nelson are going for Chardonnay with less oak influence and lower alcohol. Bingo. That's a recipe for a food-friendly wine, and with the help of winemakers Brandon Sparks-Gillis and John Dragonette of Dragonette Cellars, they're making this terrific Chardonnay from Santa Rita Hills grapes. I love its minerality, the sharp, fresh scent of citrus and, well, grape that comes through loud and clear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has decided to allow sea otters to roam freely down the Southern California coastline, abandoning its program to relocate the voracious shellfish eaters from waters reserved for fishermen. Federal officials determined that their sea otter trans-location program had failed after 25 years and thus they were terminating it, according to a decision published in the Federal Register on Wednesday. "As a result, it allows sea otters to expand their range naturally into Southern California," the notice said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1991 | FRANK MESSINA
Starting Wednesday, mollusk-lovers are advised to be more careful about buying clams, scallops, oysters and mussels directly from local docks. As part of an annual quarantine, state and local health officials are asking citizens to avoid eating mollusks caught for sport or for direct sale in local waters from May 1 to Oct. 31. During the spring and summer months, the shellfish absorb a potentially deadly poison from plankton, said Larry Honeybourne, a county environmental health specialist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1994
Great white sharks get the bad press, but bad shellfish cause the most deaths. Since 1927, more than 521 cases of shellfish poisoning resulting in 32 deaths have occurred, which is why the state prohibits harvesting mussels, clams, oysters and scallops from May 1 through Oct. 31. The bivalve mollusks are known to produce a deadly poison during spring and summer.
FOOD
October 6, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times
  This is a beauty of a Chardonnay from Santa Maria Valley, elegant and minerally, with some sass to it and a bright acidity that sends you back to the glass for another sip. It's brilliant as an apéritif but ready to escort grilled swordfish, steamed shellfish or even a chicken fricassee to the table. I might try it with fried chicken or sweetbreads too. And certainly with sushi. Region: Central Coast Price: About $25 Style: Elegant and focused What It goes with: Grilled fish, steamed shellfish, chicken fricassee, sushi Where to find it: Amazing Grapes Wine Store in Rancho Santa Margarita, (949)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
Peering into the microscope, Alan Barton thought the baby oysters looked normal, except for one thing: They were dead. Slide after slide, the results were the same. The entire batch of 100 million larvae at the Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery had perished. It took several years for the Oregon oyster breeder and a team of scientists to find the culprit: a radical change in ocean acidity. The acid levels rose so high that the larvae could not form their protective shells, according to a study published this year.
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