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NATIONAL
January 30, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian
After investing an estimated $5 billion in recent years into oil exploration in the offshore Alaskan Arctic, Shell announced Thursday that it will abandon any renewed drilling effort this year. The company cited a federal appeals court decision last week that found the Interior Department had awarded permits to Shell based on inadequate information, a major triumph for environmental groups that had been battling Shell for years. “This is a disappointing outcome, but the lack of a clear path forward means that I am not prepared to commit further resources for drilling in Alaska in 2014,” said Ben van Beurden, who took over as the company's chief executive four weeks ago. “We will look to relevant agencies and the court to resolve their open legal issues as quickly as possible.” The statement leaves open Shell's option to resume exploration of the Arctic waters in the future.
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SPORTS
January 27, 2014 | By Lisa Dillman
Keri Herman could shoot and score and deke defenders on an eighth-of-an-inch hockey skate blade, so taking on the rails and jumps of a slopestyle course in the mountains on skis felt like mere child's play. Hockey skills, apparently, are far more transferable than you might realize. Herman took hers from the rinks of her Minnesota youth to the mountains of Colorado, and now, to a spot on the U.S. Olympic team for slopestyle skiing. Assists and goals, not rails and tricks, were assumed to be Herman's route to the Winter Olympics when she was growing up in Bloomington, Minn.
WORLD
December 29, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM - In the first border flare-up of its kind in four months, at least one Katyusha rocket fired from Lebanon struck northern Israel on Sunday, triggering a heavy artillery barrage from Israeli forces in response. No casualties were reported on either side of the frontier. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, in a harshly worded statement to his Cabinet, blamed the Shiite Muslim militia Hezbollah for the rocket strike and condemned the Lebanese army for failing to "lift a finger" to rein in the group.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Turbo," the racing-snails movie from this summer, is already a cartoon series, "Turbo: F.A.S.T.," suggesting that such an eventuality was in the cards from the beginning (or somewhere near it). That other DreamWorks-made cartoons - including "The Penguins of Madagascar," "Kung Fu Panda" and "Monsters vs. Aliens," all on Nickelodeon - have taken the same route, suggests that, more than an eventuality, it was an inevitability. One difference is that it is being released by Netflix, the streamcaster's first kids' show and ergo a historic moment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2013 | Steve Chawkins
The stunned Navy pilot was gripped in pain, blood was pouring down his face and a good part of his warplane was destroyed. But worst of all, Ensign Kenneth Schechter couldn't see. An enemy shell had smashed into his Skyraider and fragments pierced his eyes. Hurtling over the Korean coast at 200 mph, Schechter was suddenly enveloped in blackness. "I'm blind! For God's sake, help me!" he cried into his radio. "I'm blind!" FOR THE RECORD: Kenneth Schechter: A news obituary in the Dec. 22 California section on Kenneth Schechter, a former Navy pilot who flew 100 miles and landed safely despite being temporarily blinded by enemy fire, misstated the final rank of Howard Thayer, the Navy pilot who guided Schechter from another plane.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2013 | By Bill Kirby
Lou Brissie, a decorated World War II veteran who overcame serious combat injuries to become an All-Star pitcher in the major leagues, has died. He was 89. Brissie, a longtime resident of North Augusta, S.C., died Monday at a veterans hospital in Augusta, Ga., his family announced. The cause was not given. Born June 5, 1924, in Anderson, S.C., and raised in nearby Ware Shoals, Leland Victor Brissie Jr. began playing baseball in a textile mill league as a 14-year-old, 6-foot-4 pitcher and first baseman.
SPORTS
November 22, 2013 | By Chris Dufresne
Olympic downhill champion Lindsey Vonn, who suffered a comeback setback Nov. 19 when she crashed during training in Colorado, has taken herself out of next week's World Cup races at Beaver Creek, Colo. Vonn partially tore the right ACL she severed at last February's World Championships in Austria but is reportedly making steady progress from her most recent crash. "Lindsey is recovering very quickly from abrasions to her face and contusions to her shoulder blade," Bill Sterett, U.S. Women's Alpine Ski Team Head Physician, wrote on the ski team's website.
WORLD
November 17, 2013 | By Fabiola Gutierrez and Chris Kraul
SANTIAGO, Chile - Buoyed by personal popularity and her promise to rewrite Chile's Constitution, Michelle Bachelet surged to the top in Sunday's first round of voting to elect a new president, but fell short of enough votes to avoid a runoff. With nearly all ballots counted, Bachelet, a pediatrician and former president, was far ahead of eight other candidates, but, at 47%, was below the simple majority needed for an outright victory. In a distant second place was economist Evelyn Matthei, a former labor minister in President Sebastian Pinera's government.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
After nearly seven decades in the business, several Grammys and countless hit records in the 1960s such as "Downtown" and "I Know a Place," Petula Clark believes she's "beginning to get the hang" of singing. "I tell you what, I get more enjoyment out of it now," said Clark, who turned 81 on Friday. "I am singing better now. This is just a bit of luck. I don't do anything for it. I don't warm up. I just go out and sing. " The British singer recently returned from a tour of her homeland performing her classics, as well as tunes from her new CD, "Lost in You. " And she's heading for Australia next year.
WORLD
November 15, 2013 | By Raja Abdulrahim
ALEPPO, Syria - The bags of pita bread are stacked in tight formation on the sidewalk, as if standing at attention. From here they will be dispersed across the rebel-held neighborhood to small, nondescript distribution centers: the bike repair shop down the street, the corner convenience store or the electrician's shop. The long lines that used to form outside bakeries, tempting targets for government air attacks, are gone. "We created the center for the protection of the people," said Abu Muhammad, a member of the bakery committee for the Bustan Qasir and Kalaseh neighborhoods.
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