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NEWS
February 6, 1994 | FERNANDO ROMERO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just south of the international border lies an improbable oasis for abandoned children. In this six-acre haven are redolent edible gardens teeming with mint, rosemary, cilantro, cauliflower, and mango and orange trees, among other flora. The beauty and aroma clash absurdly with the horrid smell of burning refuse rising from the shantytown just below, a barren place that a travel-weary Mother Teresa once observed had poverty she had "never seen anywhere else."
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NEWS
February 6, 1994 | FERNANDO ROMERO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just south of the international border lies an improbable oasis for abandoned children. In this six-acre haven are redolent edible gardens teeming with mint, rosemary, cilantro, cauliflower, and mango and orange trees, among other flora. The beauty and aroma clash absurdly with the horrid smell of burning refuse rising from the shantytown just below, a barren place that a travel-weary Mother Teresa once observed had poverty she had "never seen anywhere else."
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NEWS
February 1, 1994 | FERNANDO ROMERO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just south of the international border lies an improbable oasis for abandoned children. In this six-acre haven are redolent edible gardens teeming with mint, rosemary, cilantro, cauliflower and mango and orange trees, among other flora. The beauty and aroma clash absurdly with the horrid smell of burning refuse rising from the shantytown just below, a barren place that a travel-weary Mother Teresa once stated had poverty "I have never seen anywhere else."
NEWS
February 1, 1994 | FERNANDO ROMERO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just south of the international border lies an improbable oasis for abandoned children. In this six-acre haven are redolent edible gardens teeming with mint, rosemary, cilantro, cauliflower and mango and orange trees, among other flora. The beauty and aroma clash absurdly with the horrid smell of burning refuse rising from the shantytown just below, a barren place that a travel-weary Mother Teresa once stated had poverty "I have never seen anywhere else."
NEWS
September 14, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
At least 30,000 people sought refuge in emergency shelters from Mexico's worst flooding in half a century as the state of Chiapas began cleaning up after a week of deadly, torrential rain. Mario Fuentes Alcala, head of the government's family support agency, said flood victims were at 100 shelters in communities hardest hit by storms and flooding, blamed for more than 100 deaths on the Pacific coast of Chiapas.
WORLD
May 28, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
They looked like spooky, glow-in-the-dark Gumby figures. Hundreds of migrants from eight countries packed cheek to jowl in the back of two cargo trucks, stretching and contorting to find space and air. Their images were captured by an X-ray scanner inspecting vehicles in southern Mexico. The discovery on May 17 — the largest single interception of smuggled foreign nationals — once again turned up the pressure on Mexico to safeguard migrants who cross the country on their way to the United States, a journey that has become dangerous and costly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2000 | AGUSTIN GURZA
When Hilda Pacheco got married recently, she made sure to invite a special group of guests: the orphan children of La Mision. They held a treasured place in her heart, these lonely souls from a small town between Tijuana and Ensenada. She had worked with them for the past eight years, persuading her Irvine employer and other donors to help refurbish their crumbling orphanage, La Puerta de Fe, which means door of faith. Pacheco can honestly say she knows what it's like to be in their shoes.
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