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Shelters New York City

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NEWS
January 23, 1993 | From Associated Press
The killing of an elderly woman has prompted Gov. Mario M. Cuomo to order state teams into New York City's homeless shelters in search of potentially dangerous people who may belong in hospitals. The searches, begun Thursday, touched off debate over the state's and the city's handling of the mentally ill.
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NEWS
February 21, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Homeless people who sleep in city shelters will have to work at city jobs or be expelled, New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani said. Critics of making workfare a condition to sleep in shelters say the move would force thousands into the streets. Under workfare, those who receive public aid are required to work at city jobs, including cleaning parks and performing clerical tasks, in exchange for their benefits.
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NEWS
February 21, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Homeless people who sleep in city shelters will have to work at city jobs or be expelled, New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani said. Critics of making workfare a condition to sleep in shelters say the move would force thousands into the streets. Under workfare, those who receive public aid are required to work at city jobs, including cleaning parks and performing clerical tasks, in exchange for their benefits.
NEWS
July 20, 1998 | From Associated Press
A year to the day after their plight was discovered, 37 deaf Mexicans who had lived as indentured slaves peddling trinkets in subways were taken Sunday to a city-owned shelter. As workers loaded their possessions into a truck, the Mexicans smiled, waved and flashed peace signs from second-story windows of the motel where they have lived for 11 months. "Brooklyn!" shouted the son of one family, referring to their new home.
NEWS
July 20, 1998 | From Associated Press
A year to the day after their plight was discovered, 37 deaf Mexicans who had lived as indentured slaves peddling trinkets in subways were taken Sunday to a city-owned shelter. As workers loaded their possessions into a truck, the Mexicans smiled, waved and flashed peace signs from second-story windows of the motel where they have lived for 11 months. "Brooklyn!" shouted the son of one family, referring to their new home.
NEWS
December 12, 1988 | From United Press International
A deadly cold wave gripped a wide area from the Great Lakes to the Northeast and into the Deep South today, sending temperatures plunging to almost 30 below zero in Upstate New York, setting record lows in nearly two dozen cities and prompting relief officials to rush the homeless to shelters. In New York City, where two apparently homeless men were found dead on the streets, the temperature dropped to 5 in Central Park this morning, breaking the record for the day set in 1960.
MAGAZINE
December 18, 1994 | Gregg Segal, Gregg Segal's last photo essay for the magazine was on L.A. public pools
If you were allowed to keep only those items that would fit in one suitcase, what would you choose? For the homeless, that is a critical question. Just what keepsakes--if any--are tucked away in that Vons sack or under that garbage-bag canopy? Last spring, I decided to find out. With my camera, I sought out the homeless along the Los Angeles River, by the Alameda Street railroad tracks, at L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1997 | JOE HABERSTROH, NEWSDAY
Like many homes for the aged, the Golden Years Retirement Home here is expected to feature a carefully landscaped setting, a professionally staffed clinic and individualized dietary plans. But Golden Years also will have scratching posts, climbing ledges, an indoor play ring carpeted with synthetic turf and heated floors to warm the paws of the 100 dogs and cats expected to spend their declining years there. The Bide-A-Wee Home Assn.
NEWS
December 22, 1991 | DAVID GERMAIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A year ago, John Dixon, Tony Mastro and George Wilder were living in meat trucks, cardboard boxes and homeless shelters in New York City. Today, they are living off the land--land that could someday be theirs under a plan to turn street people into farmers. "If someone had told me a year ago I'd be digging in the earth, I would have said they were crazy," said Dixon, 50, who lost his museum job and then his apartment in 1990 and wound up on the streets.
NATIONAL
October 29, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Hours before one of the largest storms on record makes landfall in southern New Jersey Monday evening, Hurricane Sandy was speeding up and lashing the East Coast, pushing floodwaters in low-lying areas from Maryland to New York, bringing transportation systems to a halt and snapping electrical connections. Even though the superstorm was still about 200 miles offshore, Sandy's relentless march to land sped up to 28 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center. Flooding was reported in southern New Jersey and along the coastal areas in Manhattan where highways were closed as the East River continued to rise.
NEWS
January 23, 1993 | From Associated Press
The killing of an elderly woman has prompted Gov. Mario M. Cuomo to order state teams into New York City's homeless shelters in search of potentially dangerous people who may belong in hospitals. The searches, begun Thursday, touched off debate over the state's and the city's handling of the mentally ill.
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