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Shelters Overcrowding

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1995 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the babies' bungalow at Orangewood Children's Home, cribs fill the open room that serves as one big nursery, sticking out from every nook unoccupied by strollers and boxes of diapers. In the bungalow for teen-age girls, twin beds are pressed against the walls of small rooms, and in some, mattresses lie on the floor for a third girl to sleep on. At Orangewood, the last refuge for the county's abused and neglected children, every bed, every crib, every pallet, cot and stroller is taken.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2012 | By Maria L. La Ganga, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - A plan to combat panhandling and animal shelter overcrowding in one fell swoop could be described as killing two birds with one stone. But here in the city of St. Francis, no one talks about offing our feathered friends. Instead, the latest municipal innovation - which will pair beggars with problem puppies to make life better for both - is simply called WOOF: Wonderful Opportunities for Occupants and Fidos. In August, carefully selected dogs from the city shelter will be given to screened and trained formerly homeless people, who will foster the animals until permanent homes can be found.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1993 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are delivered to the doors of the Orangewood Children's Home virtually every day. Toddlers whose bodies are scarred with cigarette burns. Teen-age children physically abused and oftentimes sexually molested by their parents. Even the occasional newborn dumped in a trash can moments after entering the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2003 | Deborah Sullivan Brennan, Special to The Times
The tiger cubs prowling the cages at the Fund for Animals shelter here in rural San Diego County look like big, stuffed toys, with their oversized feet, mischievous faces and thick, striped fur. These cubs, 5 to 11 months old, were seized from Tiger Rescue, a facility in Colton that calls itself a retirement home for animals that have appeared in movies or TV commercials and that otherwise would be destroyed or deserted. An investigation by the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1993 | GEOFF BOUCHER
Hoping to come up with some solutions, county social service officials are asking the Board of Supervisors to approve a 12-month, in-depth study of overcrowding at Orangewood Children's Home. The plan, which will be considered by the supervisors next week, proposes that two staff members spend a year delving into the causes of crowding at the emergency shelter, chief among them the increasingly longer stays by troubled children.
NEWS
August 14, 1989
Hospitality House, a San Francisco shelter that opens later than other local shelters and where the homeless generally go as a last resort, turned away more people in May than in any month since it opened five years ago. "These people are staying up until 11:30 at night for basically a shot in the dark," said Robin Tobin, executive director of the shelter. "There's no room at the inn." In 1985, Hospitality House turned away people a monthly average of 195 times.
NEWS
June 21, 1994 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orangewood Children's Home has to shelter abused children almost twice as long as it did a decade ago, creating severe overcrowding conditions at the 263-bed facility, a new county study has found. And most of the children being sheltered there for two months or more suffer from such severe problems that it's nearly impossible to find foster homes for them, according to a Social Services Agency report released Monday.
NEWS
April 2, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Living quarters are so cramped at Orange County's only emergency shelter for abused children that toddlers sleep in the foyer of a gym, health workers struggle to control contagious diseases, and social workers are hard-pressed to meet the needs of the increasingly troubled children they serve. That is the sobering picture county officials presented Tuesday of the Orangewood Children's Home, a facility designed to hold a maximum of 236 abandoned, abused or neglected children.
NEWS
December 24, 1996 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The visitors will arrive in their shiny new cars. The gym will be decked in red and green streamers. Banquet tables will bristle with tiny, living Christmas trees. And the residents of the county's only emergency shelter for abused and neglected children will receive hand-delivered gifts from Santa Claus--from winter parkas to Sony Walkman radios.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2001 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A California state court this week ordered county-run shelters for abused and neglected children to comply with the same strict licensing requirements imposed on privately-run facilities or cease operating. The ruling gives shelters in nine counties, including Los Angeles County's MacLaren Children's Center, 60 days to eliminate overcrowded conditions, limit the use of certain physical restraints and establish minimum staff and training qualifications.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2001 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A California state court this week ordered county-run shelters for abused and neglected children to comply with the same strict licensing requirements imposed on privately-run facilities or cease operating. The ruling gives shelters in nine counties, including Los Angeles County's MacLaren Children's Center, 60 days to eliminate overcrowded conditions, limit the use of certain physical restraints and establish minimum staff and training qualifications.
NEWS
April 2, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Living quarters are so cramped at Orange County's only emergency shelter for abused children that toddlers sleep in the foyer of a gym, health workers struggle to control contagious diseases, and social workers are hard-pressed to meet the needs of the increasingly troubled children they serve. That is the sobering picture county officials presented Tuesday of the Orangewood Children's Home, a facility designed to hold a maximum of 236 abandoned, abused or neglected children.
NEWS
December 24, 1996 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The visitors will arrive in their shiny new cars. The gym will be decked in red and green streamers. Banquet tables will bristle with tiny, living Christmas trees. And the residents of the county's only emergency shelter for abused and neglected children will receive hand-delivered gifts from Santa Claus--from winter parkas to Sony Walkman radios.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1995 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the babies' bungalow at Orangewood Children's Home, cribs fill the open room that serves as one big nursery, sticking out from every nook unoccupied by strollers and boxes of diapers. In the bungalow for teen-age girls, twin beds are pressed against the walls of small rooms, and in some, mattresses lie on the floor for a third girl to sleep on. At Orangewood, the last refuge for the county's abused and neglected children, every bed, every crib, every pallet, cot and stroller is taken.
NEWS
June 21, 1994 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orangewood Children's Home has to shelter abused children almost twice as long as it did a decade ago, creating severe overcrowding conditions at the 263-bed facility, a new county study has found. And most of the children being sheltered there for two months or more suffer from such severe problems that it's nearly impossible to find foster homes for them, according to a Social Services Agency report released Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1993 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are delivered to the doors of the Orangewood Children's Home virtually every day. Toddlers whose bodies are scarred with cigarette burns. Teen-age children physically abused and oftentimes sexually molested by their parents. Even the occasional newborn dumped in a trash can moments after entering the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2012 | By Maria L. La Ganga, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - A plan to combat panhandling and animal shelter overcrowding in one fell swoop could be described as killing two birds with one stone. But here in the city of St. Francis, no one talks about offing our feathered friends. Instead, the latest municipal innovation - which will pair beggars with problem puppies to make life better for both - is simply called WOOF: Wonderful Opportunities for Occupants and Fidos. In August, carefully selected dogs from the city shelter will be given to screened and trained formerly homeless people, who will foster the animals until permanent homes can be found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2003 | Deborah Sullivan Brennan, Special to The Times
The tiger cubs prowling the cages at the Fund for Animals shelter here in rural San Diego County look like big, stuffed toys, with their oversized feet, mischievous faces and thick, striped fur. These cubs, 5 to 11 months old, were seized from Tiger Rescue, a facility in Colton that calls itself a retirement home for animals that have appeared in movies or TV commercials and that otherwise would be destroyed or deserted. An investigation by the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1993 | GEOFF BOUCHER
Hoping to come up with some solutions, county social service officials are asking the Board of Supervisors to approve a 12-month, in-depth study of overcrowding at Orangewood Children's Home. The plan, which will be considered by the supervisors next week, proposes that two staff members spend a year delving into the causes of crowding at the emergency shelter, chief among them the increasingly longer stays by troubled children.
NEWS
August 14, 1989
Hospitality House, a San Francisco shelter that opens later than other local shelters and where the homeless generally go as a last resort, turned away more people in May than in any month since it opened five years ago. "These people are staying up until 11:30 at night for basically a shot in the dark," said Robin Tobin, executive director of the shelter. "There's no room at the inn." In 1985, Hospitality House turned away people a monthly average of 195 times.
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