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Shelters San Diego

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September 26, 1994 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On paper the issue is a fight over what to do with an industrial section of downtown San Diego called Centre City East, a jumble of warehouses, vacant lots, bus and trolley yards, and aging businesses with fences topped by barbed wire. But the fight could just as well be called a struggle for the soul of California's second-largest city. On one side is Roman Catholic Msgr.
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NEWS
September 26, 1994 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On paper the issue is a fight over what to do with an industrial section of downtown San Diego called Centre City East, a jumble of warehouses, vacant lots, bus and trolley yards, and aging businesses with fences topped by barbed wire. But the fight could just as well be called a struggle for the soul of California's second-largest city. On one side is Roman Catholic Msgr.
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NEWS
October 21, 1993 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 11 1/2 years, Susan Middleton gave lethal injections to thousands of animals that no one wanted. Her pay and training were poor, and she often felt gravely depressed. Forced to work as quickly as possible, she once euthanized 900 animals in a 30-day period. "The worst ones were the 3-week-old kittens with big blue eyes," she said. "They look up at you, and all you have is a great big needle. I had to keep telling myself: 'This is not my fault. It's not my fault. It's not .'
NEWS
October 21, 1993 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 11 1/2 years, Susan Middleton gave lethal injections to thousands of animals that no one wanted. Her pay and training were poor, and she often felt gravely depressed. Forced to work as quickly as possible, she once euthanized 900 animals in a 30-day period. "The worst ones were the 3-week-old kittens with big blue eyes," she said. "They look up at you, and all you have is a great big needle. I had to keep telling myself: 'This is not my fault. It's not my fault. It's not .'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1989
A free concert on Mariner's Point to aid the homeless has been called off because city officials feared there would be no effective crowd control. The concert was scheduled for Sunday and was to benefit the United States Mission, which runs five homeless shelters in San Diego, said the Rev. Pat Rocco, the mission's director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1992 | ANNE BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Overnight shelters in San Diego reopened Tuesday night as biting-cold winter weather began chilling the county. With overnight temperatures expected in the low 30s in some areas, volunteers planned to open the East County shelter for anyone needing a place to stay. The National Guard Armory, at Pierce Street near Interstate 8 in El Cajon, will be open from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. whenever predicted temperatures are below 36 degrees, or below 40 degrees when rain is expected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1990 | MONICA RODRIGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the chill wind and rain have prompted the county and the St. Vincent de Paul Society to open their cold-weather homeless shelters, San Diego's municipal shelter remains closed. Bill Wolf, spokesman for the San Diego City Office of Emergency Management, said the city was not planning to open the Municipal Gymnasium in Balboa Park Friday night because temperatures had not dropped low enough.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1990 | BERNICE HIRABAYASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Offered a brief respite from the spell of bad luck that left him homeless, jobless and on crutches, David Jackson took advantage of a Christmas gift Monday afternoon from a local telephone company--free phone calls to anywhere in the United States. "It was great," said the 34-year-old motorcycle mechanic after speaking to his father in Modesto for more than 20 minutes. "I haven't talked to the old man for at least six months. It was nice to talk to him and hear his voice."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1985 | JOHN NIELSEN, Times Staff Writer
Loren and Alice Rucker paid $60 for a pair of wild goats Saturday, for reasons they have yet to comprehend. "We just heard about them, so we bought some," said Alice Rucker, who lives with her husband and daughter in a rural corner of Sylmar in the San Fernando Valley. "We thought we'd do our duty." The Ruckers were among about 50 people who came to the Los Angeles County Animal Care and Safety shelter in Castaic on the first day the refugee goats were up for adoption.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2005 | Richard Marosi and Donna Horowitz, Special to The Times
Hundreds of dogs and cats left stranded by Hurricane Katrina are being flown by chartered commercial jets to shelters and homes in California by wealthy donors, including a dog-loving Texas oil billionaire and his wife. Aboard the Boeing 737-800 "flying animal shelter," as one flight attendant dubbed a recent airlift, dogs and cats whimpered in crates strapped into the passenger seats. Some were given sponge baths, cuddled and allowed to trot up to the cockpit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1985 | JOHN NIELSEN, Times Staff Writer
Loren and Alice Rucker paid $60 for a pair of wild goats Saturday, even though they didn't really need any goats. "We just heard about them, so we bought some," said Alice Rucker, who lives with her husband and daughter in a rural corner of Sylmar. "We thought we'd do our duty." The Ruckers were part of a small gathering of Los Angeles County residents who came to the Los Angeles County Animal Care and Safety shelter in Castaic in hopes of providing homes for a herd of refugee goats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1988 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
Despite strong support from several Republican legislators, the Deukmejian Administration continues to resist efforts to spend state money on housing for migrant farm workers who now live in caves and makeshift shelters in San Diego County, lawmakers say. An Administration spokeswoman, however, says the state is prepared to build housing for homeless field workers in North County but has found little support for the idea among local officials.
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