Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsShelters San Francisco
IN THE NEWS

Shelters San Francisco

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 27, 1997 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Guinea Apollos, in the polite terms of San Francisco's homeless advocates, is a "vehicularly housed resident." In the less polite terms of the police, she is someone living illegally in a car on city streets. To be precise, in Apollos' case, the vehicle is a 1964 school bus purchased three years ago when her monthly disability check could no longer cover the rent on her small San Francisco apartment. Apollos has painted her bus flat black and shares it with a large, lazy cat named Sydney.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 27, 1997 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Guinea Apollos, in the polite terms of San Francisco's homeless advocates, is a "vehicularly housed resident." In the less polite terms of the police, she is someone living illegally in a car on city streets. To be precise, in Apollos' case, the vehicle is a 1964 school bus purchased three years ago when her monthly disability check could no longer cover the rent on her small San Francisco apartment. Apollos has painted her bus flat black and shares it with a large, lazy cat named Sydney.
Advertisement
OPINION
July 29, 1990
San Francisco Mayor Art Agnos is taking impressive steps to help homeless men, women and children get off the streets and into safe, decent and affordable housing. His ambitious plan--if financed as designed--will provide temporary shelters, treatment centers, transitional housing and permanent housing. The program, appropriately called Beyond Shelter, deserves support and, where possible, duplication.
OPINION
July 29, 1990
San Francisco Mayor Art Agnos is taking impressive steps to help homeless men, women and children get off the streets and into safe, decent and affordable housing. His ambitious plan--if financed as designed--will provide temporary shelters, treatment centers, transitional housing and permanent housing. The program, appropriately called Beyond Shelter, deserves support and, where possible, duplication.
NEWS
June 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The world's largest condom manufacturer, Schmid Laboratories, has launched a two-month advertising campaign with taxis, bus shelters and San Francisco's famous cable cars displaying black-letter ads, declaring "For extra protection--Ramses condoms." Schmid President Don Falk conceded that the AIDS crisis created opportunities for manufacturers by expanding the market and increasing public tolerance for selling condoms. City officials agreed that the time has come for condom advertising.
NEWS
September 29, 1995 | PATT MORRISON
Sonoma County can't have it--no impartial jurors. Los Angeles doesn't want it--no money. Yet L.A. County is still on the short list to host the Polly Klaas murder trial, and the lawyer defending the man accused of abducting the 12-year-old girl from her Petaluma home says he has done some courtroom shopping--with Judge Lance A. Ito.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2012 | Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Even by the standards of today's economy, Virgin America's financial health seems pretty weak: While enjoying a hip, high-tech reputation, the San Francisco airline has reported only one profitable three-month period since it launched nearly five years ago. If the airline's executives are worried, they aren't showing it. In fact, they continue to hire at a brisk pace - 500 workers last year - and, at a time when other airlines are cutting back,...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1997 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Reseda grandmother who raised four sons is reliving the rigors of parenthood all over. This time, she is juggling triplets. "I had forgotten about getting up in the middle of the night, and I didn't even know they needed to be burped," said Patricia Kiefer. Kiefer's "babies" are kittens--the second litter she is fostering under a pilot program launched at the West Valley Animal Care and Control Center in Chatsworth.
NEWS
February 6, 1986 | LIZ MULLEN, Times Staff Writer
She tidied up the motel room, placing stuffed animals on one of the two double beds with care. Her two daughters, ages 3 and 16 months, sat at a small table, painting with watercolors in a coloring book. Their mother is tiny; she looks more like 15 than 25. Susan (not her real name) had been at the Orange County motel for three days. She left her husband because he had assaulted her twice in the past week. It scared her, she said, because he usually doesn't hit her when she is pregnant.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|