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Shelters Youth

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1995 | LESLIE EARNEST
A group that operates a youth shelter in Laguna Beach will ask the City Council on Tuesday for $100,000 to help buy a house where teen-agers needing additional help could live for as long as six months after leaving the shelter. The transitional living center would help teen-agers with exceptional maturity, said Becky Anderson, CSP Youth Shelter's assistant director.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2001 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Christine remembers the nights she sold her body on the streets for food and a place to sleep, but she doesn't dwell on those memories anymore. Instead, the 16-year-old with long, dark hair and a broad smile looks forward to going to college and becoming a doctor--dreams she's nurtured as a resident of Children of the Night, a Van Nuys shelter for sexually abused children and former child prostitutes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1997 | REGINA HONG
A nonprofit group is seeking Ventura County residents who can offer short-term shelter for runaway, homeless and distressed youths. Camarillo-based Interface Children Family Services provides training and a small financial reimbursement to families who take a child into their homes during evenings and weekends. The Cool Homes shelter program serves children 10 to 18 who may be homeless or need time away from their parents to resolve family problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1997 | FRED ALVAREZ
Interface Children, Family Services is seeking Ventura County families interested in providing short-term shelter for children in need. The agency is looking for people to provide so-called Cool Homes for youths between the ages of 10 and 17 who need some space while they work out problems with their parents. The families are asked to provide children with a place to stay in the evenings and on weekends. "If these adolescents can have a cooling-off period . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2001 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Christine remembers the nights she sold her body on the streets for food and a place to sleep, but she doesn't dwell on those memories anymore. Instead, the 16-year-old with long, dark hair and a broad smile looks forward to going to college and becoming a doctor--dreams she's nurtured as a resident of Children of the Night, a Van Nuys shelter for sexually abused children and former child prostitutes.
NEWS
April 30, 1987
The Clare Foundation will celebrate the opening of its youth recovery home with a reception from 11 a.m. the 1 p.m. today at the renovated facility, 844 Pico Blvd., Santa Monica. The home will serve 10 boys and 10 girls, ages 13 to 17, who are recovering from alcohol and drug abuse. The program is one of the first of its kind in California, officials said.
NEWS
September 15, 1994 | LORENZA MUNOZ
Covenant House California, a shelter and counseling center for runaway youths, has begun the second phase of a $10-million project to expand and improve its facilities. Once completed, the new facilities, connected by an outdoor recreation area, will include 96 beds, a health clinic, employment assistance center, administrative offices and counseling center. Previously, a shelter was on Sunset Boulevard, and the administrative offices and health clinic were on Western Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2005 | Susana Enriquez, Times Staff Writer
After toiling all day in the pepper fields and sweltering triple-digit temperatures, farmworker Eulalia Solis heads home to a trailer whose overworked swamp cooler provides only a tinge of relief. She cannot afford an air conditioner, and even if she could, the wiring at the trailer park wouldn't provide enough power for a window unit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2003 | From Religion News Service
Preacher, counselor and social service provider are part of the job description of the Rev. Jerry Wise of First Presbyterian Church of Chicago. So, too, is physical plant supervisor. His historic church, built in 1928, covers 60,000 square feet. Its soaring tower incorporates stones from Westminster Abbey, Reims Cathedral and other famous religious structures. The church is lovely to behold but a burden to maintain.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1989 | ZAN DUBIN
These days, Adolfo V. (Al) Nodal, the city's new cultural chief, wears conservative suits and silk ties to work. His spacious office on the 15th floor of City Hall boasts an oversize desk and an expansive view of the San Gabriel Mountains and Chinatown. He spends a lot of time in tedious City Council meetings, monotonous municipal planning sessions and does lunch with bureaucrats and politicians. The life style couldn't be further from the one that Nodal carried out the last time he lived here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1995 | LESLIE EARNEST
A group that operates a youth shelter in Laguna Beach will ask the City Council on Tuesday for $100,000 to help buy a house where teen-agers needing additional help could live for as long as six months after leaving the shelter. The transitional living center would help teen-agers with exceptional maturity, said Becky Anderson, CSP Youth Shelter's assistant director.
NEWS
September 15, 1994 | LORENZA MUNOZ
Covenant House California, a shelter and counseling center for runaway youths, has begun the second phase of a $10-million project to expand and improve its facilities. Once completed, the new facilities, connected by an outdoor recreation area, will include 96 beds, a health clinic, employment assistance center, administrative offices and counseling center. Previously, a shelter was on Sunset Boulevard, and the administrative offices and health clinic were on Western Avenue.
NEWS
April 30, 1987
The Clare Foundation will celebrate the opening of its youth recovery home with a reception from 11 a.m. the 1 p.m. today at the renovated facility, 844 Pico Blvd., Santa Monica. The home will serve 10 boys and 10 girls, ages 13 to 17, who are recovering from alcohol and drug abuse. The program is one of the first of its kind in California, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2007 | Nancy Vogel and Evan Halper, Times Staff Writers
Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez used a small charity as a conduit to funnel almost $300,000 from companies and organizations with business in the Capitol to events that helped him politically. By giving to the charity, the donors whom Nunez solicited earned tax deductions for which they would not have qualified had they given directly to Nunez's campaign accounts. They were also able to donate more than the $7,200 maximum allowed under California's campaign fundraising rules.
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