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Shem Bitterman

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1998 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Playwright Shem Bitterman could have a second career as an entomologist. In "The Job" at the Hudson Guild, Bitterman chronicles the insectile pursuits of his lowlife characters with the exactitude of a scientific field researcher.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1998 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Playwright Shem Bitterman could have a second career as an entomologist. In "The Job" at the Hudson Guild, Bitterman chronicles the insectile pursuits of his lowlife characters with the exactitude of a scientific field researcher.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1990 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shem Bitterman claims to be slowing down. There was a time, he says, when it took him no more than a day to write a play. Now it takes weeks, sometimes even months, to finish a first draft. Not that the 29-year-old playwright is complaining. By anyone's standard, including his own, his recent pace has been torrid. "Three plays opening at the same time doesn't usually happen," he acknowledged the other day.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1990 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shem Bitterman claims to be slowing down. There was a time, he says, when it took him no more than a day to write a play. Now it takes weeks, sometimes even months, to finish a first draft. Not that the 29-year-old playwright is complaining. By anyone's standard, including his own, his recent pace has been torrid. "Three plays opening at the same time doesn't usually happen," he acknowledged the other day.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1990 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Shem Bitterman is a young man to watch, if only to make sure that he works just a little harder at creating his realities on stage and digs a little deeper than he is digging right now. Bitterman's "The Ramp," which opened Saturday at South Coast Repertory, treads on slippery ground. Skates might even be the better verb to use. The co-runner-up (with Octavio Solis, who wrote the previously reviewed "Man of the Flesh") in SCR's second annual new play Calfest has taken on a tough subject.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1990 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Shem Bitterman is a young man to watch, if only to make sure that he works just a little harder at creating his realities on stage and digs a little deeper than he is digging right now. Bitterman's "The Ramp," which opened Saturday at South Coast Repertory, treads on slippery ground. Skates might even be the better verb to use. This co-runner-up in SCR's 2nd annual new play Calfest (with Octavio Solis, who wrote the previously reviewed "Man of the Flesh"), has taken on a tough subject.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1990
After much procrastination and hopes that The Times would expand on an article that was buried in the back of the first section, I feel that I must comment on what I contend to be an extremely troubling situation. An awkwardly worded sentence in the May 5 article states, "A federal jury decided Friday that a businessman was not lying when he said Reagan-Bush campaign officials asked Iranians not to free American hostages until after the 1980 presidential election."
BOOKS
January 12, 1992
"Two Lives in the Theater" stated that I had studied with John Steppling and graduated from his playwriting class. Neither statement is true. I have never studied with John, nor is my work in any way influenced by his. My teacher was Bob Hedley at the University of Iowa, where I got my master's degree in theater arts. SHEM BITTERMAN Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1994 | Jan Herman
The winners: * 1993: "Green Icebergs" by Cecilia Fannon ($5,000), SCR still deciding whether to produce; "Too Good to Be True" by David Ford ($3,000), not produced; "Forcing Hyacinths" by Allison Gregory ($1,000), not produced; "Simply the Thing She Is" by Kate Hawley ($1,000), not produced; "Bad Press" by Glen Merzer ($1,000), not produced. * 1992: "Mrs. Zelinski Comes to Call" by Nancy Crawford ($5,000), not produced; "To Distraction" by Cecilia Fannon ($3,000), not produced.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE
New plays, a revival and a special engagement of the Taper's Improvisational Theatre Project (ITP) will constitute the 1990 season at the Mark Taper Forum's experimental Taper, Too. John Steppling's "The Thrill" (Jan.23-Feb.18), to be co-directed by the playwright and Taper associate artistic director Robert Egan, is described as "a story of tawdry love in a shopping mall with characters whose vulnerability and dreams are sometimes masked by emotional brutality."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1990 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Shem Bitterman is a young man to watch, if only to make sure that he works just a little harder at creating his realities on stage and digs a little deeper than he is digging right now. Bitterman's "The Ramp," which opened Saturday at South Coast Repertory, treads on slippery ground. Skates might even be the better verb to use. This co-runner-up in SCR's 2nd annual new play Calfest (with Octavio Solis, who wrote the previously reviewed "Man of the Flesh"), has taken on a tough subject.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1990 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Shem Bitterman is a young man to watch, if only to make sure that he works just a little harder at creating his realities on stage and digs a little deeper than he is digging right now. Bitterman's "The Ramp," which opened Saturday at South Coast Repertory, treads on slippery ground. Skates might even be the better verb to use. The co-runner-up (with Octavio Solis, who wrote the previously reviewed "Man of the Flesh") in SCR's second annual new play Calfest has taken on a tough subject.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1990
After much procrastination and hopes that The Times would expand on an article that was buried in the back of the first section, I feel that I must comment on what I contend to be an extremely troubling situation. An awkwardly worded sentence in the May 5 article states, "A federal jury decided Friday that a businessman was not lying when he said Reagan-Bush campaign officials asked Iranians not to free American hostages until after the 1980 presidential election."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2006 | Charlotte Stoudt
Shem Bitterman's "Sensitive Skin," a creepy-sexy chamber piece about ambition of all sorts in late '90s New York, features a bizarre love triangle as sleek and inviting as the New Order dance classic. At a gallery opening of erotic photography, bad boy Todd (Paul Wesley) chases after the up-and-coming artist, Eve (an intriguing if nasal Kate Ascott-Evans), while Todd's clean-cut older brother Nick (Warren Kole) just doesn't get it.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scrape away the phony tinsel of "Tinseltown" and what you find underneath is unprintable. This penny dreadful is an example of a January doldrums release at its worst. Arye Gross and Tom Wood play struggling screenwriters so down on their luck that they're about to board a bus out of Hollywood when, at the very last second, someone actually takes a call from them.
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