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Shen Tong

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NEWS
September 1, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shen Tong, one of China's most prominent exiled dissidents, was detained by police at his mother's home early this morning, about 10 days after his return to Beijing. Shen, who had returned from exile in the United States and spent nearly three weeks in other parts of China before arriving in the capital, had spread word Monday that he planned a press conference for this morning. That step apparently prompted authorities to move against him.
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NEWS
October 25, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chinese democracy activist Shen Tong arrived in the United States and vowed to return to the homeland that imprisoned and expelled him. Shen, who arrived from Beijing, said he was "very grateful to the international pressure" that led to his release from China, where he had been arrested and held since Sept. 1. He also said he hoped to return to China "with or without permission."
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NEWS
September 3, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chinese police detained Harvard scholar Ross Terrill early Wednesday, then expelled him to Hong Kong for his involvement with the dissident former student leader Shen Tong. Shen, the first exiled pro-democracy leader to return to China since the crackdown on the Tian An Men Square protests in 1989, was detained in Beijing early Tuesday, a few hours before he planned to speak at a news conference.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chinese police detained Harvard scholar Ross Terrill early Wednesday, then expelled him to Hong Kong for his involvement with the dissident former student leader Shen Tong. Shen, the first exiled pro-democracy leader to return to China since the crackdown on the Tian An Men Square protests in 1989, was detained in Beijing early Tuesday, a few hours before he planned to speak at a news conference.
BOOKS
December 23, 1990 | Carolyn Wakeman, Wakeman teaches in the Graduate School of Journalism, University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of "To the Storm: The Odyssey of a Revolutionary Chinese Woman."
Shen Tong was at home in central Beijing, just footsteps from the stretch of Changan Avenue that would see the heaviest casualties, when the shooting began on the night of June 3, 1989. For a moment, like many others, he assumed that the soldiers spraying gunfire were using rubber bullets. Then came the intolerable recognition. "People who had been hit fell to the ground and lay still. 'Those people are dead,' I thought to myself. 'The bullets are real.' I couldn't believe it. It was as if this were all happening in a dream."
NEWS
October 25, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chinese democracy activist Shen Tong arrived in the United States and vowed to return to the homeland that imprisoned and expelled him. Shen, who arrived from Beijing, said he was "very grateful to the international pressure" that led to his release from China, where he had been arrested and held since Sept. 1. He also said he hoped to return to China "with or without permission."
NEWS
November 19, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Far, far from home, Shen Tong writes on a computer in his office on a tree-lined street here. He is a biology student, but this passage was about China, for a speech that he would deliver to the Asia Society in New York. The land of Shen's birth is never far from his thoughts or from his dreams.
NEWS
July 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
At 20, Shen Tong is already an outlaw in the eyes of the Chinese government, which has posted his name on a list of 21 students wanted for activities in the pro-democracy movement. The lanky, self-assured Shen, who escaped China and arrived in the United States on June 11, said Friday that while he fears for his safety, he intends to continue fighting for democracy in his homeland. "We have to try our best," he said. "This movement is still a movement."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1990 | From United Press International
Cable TV magnate Ted Turner apologized today for remarks that Christians found offensive--one day after he reportedly made amends for his defense of the Chinese government's violent reaction to Tian An Men Square protesters. Turner, who in the last few months has called Christianity "a religion for losers" on repeated occasions, made his apology during a luncheon at the First Baptist Church in Woodstock.
NEWS
December 2, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Far, far from home, Shen Tong writes on a computer in his office on a tree-lined street here. He is a biology student, but this passage was about China, for a speech that he would deliver to the Asia Society in New York. The land of Shen's birth is never far from his thoughts or from his dreams.
NEWS
September 1, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shen Tong, one of China's most prominent exiled dissidents, was detained by police at his mother's home early this morning, about 10 days after his return to Beijing. Shen, who had returned from exile in the United States and spent nearly three weeks in other parts of China before arriving in the capital, had spread word Monday that he planned a press conference for this morning. That step apparently prompted authorities to move against him.
BOOKS
December 23, 1990 | Carolyn Wakeman, Wakeman teaches in the Graduate School of Journalism, University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of "To the Storm: The Odyssey of a Revolutionary Chinese Woman."
Shen Tong was at home in central Beijing, just footsteps from the stretch of Changan Avenue that would see the heaviest casualties, when the shooting began on the night of June 3, 1989. For a moment, like many others, he assumed that the soldiers spraying gunfire were using rubber bullets. Then came the intolerable recognition. "People who had been hit fell to the ground and lay still. 'Those people are dead,' I thought to myself. 'The bullets are real.' I couldn't believe it. It was as if this were all happening in a dream."
NEWS
November 19, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Far, far from home, Shen Tong writes on a computer in his office on a tree-lined street here. He is a biology student, but this passage was about China, for a speech that he would deliver to the Asia Society in New York. The land of Shen's birth is never far from his thoughts or from his dreams.
NEWS
July 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
At 20, Shen Tong is already an outlaw in the eyes of the Chinese government, which has posted his name on a list of 21 students wanted for activities in the pro-democracy movement. The lanky, self-assured Shen, who escaped China and arrived in the United States on June 11, said Friday that while he fears for his safety, he intends to continue fighting for democracy in his homeland. "We have to try our best," he said. "This movement is still a movement."
NEWS
August 13, 1989 | ELIZABETH LU, Times Staff Writer
A group of exiled Chinese dissidents who fled the country after a bloody June crackdown in Beijing urged their countrymen at a Los Angeles forum Saturday to support a movement to build a political force capable of challenging the Communist government. The forum, which drew more than 1,500 people to the University of Southern California's Bovard Auditorium, capped a weekend of activities hosted by Southern California Chinese groups for visiting leaders of Beijing's pro-democracy movement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1992 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fearing a presidential veto, hundreds of local Chinese students and scholars have joined a nationwide effort urging President Bush to sign a bill that would enable them to apply for permanent residency beginning July 1 if conditions in China do not allow their safe return. "Basic human rights violations continue . . . in today's China, even though the world has gone through tremendous changes," said Feifei Jin, president of the 500-member Chinese Students and Scholars Assn. at UCLA.
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