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Shenandoah National Park

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NEWS
November 5, 1989 | ALICE DIGILIO, THE WASHINGTON POST
As autumn spreads its colors across Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains, nearly a quarter-million visitors will flock to Skyline Drive in Shenandoah National Park to enjoy the views. Park officials and many conservationists suggest they take a good look and remember what they see, for the views are changing. The patchwork of fields and forests below the 50-year-old drive in many places is under siege from subdivisions, and a haze of air pollution on some days makes it hard to see anything at all.
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TRAVEL
October 2, 2005 | Arthur Frommer, Special to The Times
AUTUMN is a wonderful time to explore the nation's parks, and hiking is one of the least expensive, healthiest and most rewarding ways to do so. Many state and national parks, forests and seashores have well-marked trails. Even if you're not in top physical condition, you'll probably be able to find a level, easy trail or one that has access for disabled travelers. Here are my choices for the top autumn hikes in America. Point Reyes National Seashore, Northern California.
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NEWS
October 9, 1994 | D'VERA COHN, WASHINGTON POST
Randy Winstead lives in the land of the real. He's a botanist, with a scientist's respect for facts. He's a husband and father, 39 years old, who holds two steady hands on the wheel when he drives. He knows that the animal he saw in Shenandoah National Park not long ago has "the same air about it as the Loch Ness monster." But he is certain it was a beast that officially does not exist here: a cougar.
OPINION
February 1, 2003
The prospect that campfire talks at Mesa Verde National Park or nature walks at Shenandoah National Park will be led not by rangers in Smokey Bear hats but by volunteers and that other jobs will be done by employees splattered with the logos of corporations has set park visitors to howling like frenzied coyotes. Interior Department officials insist that Secretary Gale A.
TRAVEL
June 3, 1990 | Christopher Kenneally
How to get there: Enter Shenandoah National Park from four places along Skyline Drive, which runs north-south from Front Royal, on Interstate 66 about 70 miles west of Washington, D.C., to Waynesboro, on I-64 about 25 miles west of Charlottesville, Va. Where to stay: Travelers on a budget can try the Tabard Inn, 1739 N St. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036, (202) 785-1277). Rates begin at $53 per night with a shared bath. Rooms with private bath start at $92. Prices include breakfast.
NEWS
December 21, 1987 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
It was one of the biggest Christmas gifts in the history of this nation. On Dec. 26, 1935, during the depths of the Great Depression, the people of Virginia presented Secretary of Interior Harold Ickes deeds to 176,429 acres of land for the establishment of Shenandoah National Park. Nine years earlier, Congress had approved legislation to create the 75-mile-long, half-mile-to-13-mile-wide, densely forested park--alive with wildlife--along the crest of the Blue Ridge Mountains.
TRAVEL
March 17, 1996
Campers can now reserve sites up to five months in advance--compared to the previous limit of 56 days--at 12 of the country's most popular national parks, including five in California. The participating parks in the state include Yosemite, Death Valley, Joshua Tree, Sequoia-Kings Canyon and Whiskeytown. The others are Acadia National Park, Me.; Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland and Virginia; Cape Hatteras National Seashore, N.C.; Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tenn.
TRAVEL
October 2, 2005 | Arthur Frommer, Special to The Times
AUTUMN is a wonderful time to explore the nation's parks, and hiking is one of the least expensive, healthiest and most rewarding ways to do so. Many state and national parks, forests and seashores have well-marked trails. Even if you're not in top physical condition, you'll probably be able to find a level, easy trail or one that has access for disabled travelers. Here are my choices for the top autumn hikes in America. Point Reyes National Seashore, Northern California.
NEWS
March 13, 1988 | GUY DARST, Associated Press
From gypsy moths in the Shenandoah to wild pigs in the Great Smokies to creeping kudzu in the West, an invasion of exotic animal and plant species is threating the nation's national parks. A draft summary of a major, just-completed National Park Service assessment of the condition of natural and cultural resources lists "encroachment by plants and animals not native to park environments" ahead of any other "major issues and threats" to natural resources.
NEWS
June 11, 1995 | DAVID REED, ASSOCIATED PRESS
About 2 million people a year come to Shenandoah National Park, camping and taking in stunning views like the one from Skyline Drive winding along the crest of the Blue Ridge Mountains. What they don't see from there are the rotting floorboards and leaky roofs of park buildings, and the dangerous dead trees that threaten to shut down whole sections of the park. Park employees live in trailers that were already secondhand when the park bought them in 1970.
TRAVEL
March 17, 1996
Campers can now reserve sites up to five months in advance--compared to the previous limit of 56 days--at 12 of the country's most popular national parks, including five in California. The participating parks in the state include Yosemite, Death Valley, Joshua Tree, Sequoia-Kings Canyon and Whiskeytown. The others are Acadia National Park, Me.; Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland and Virginia; Cape Hatteras National Seashore, N.C.; Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tenn.
NEWS
June 11, 1995 | DAVID REED, ASSOCIATED PRESS
About 2 million people a year come to Shenandoah National Park, camping and taking in stunning views like the one from Skyline Drive winding along the crest of the Blue Ridge Mountains. What they don't see from there are the rotting floorboards and leaky roofs of park buildings, and the dangerous dead trees that threaten to shut down whole sections of the park. Park employees live in trailers that were already secondhand when the park bought them in 1970.
NEWS
October 9, 1994 | D'VERA COHN, WASHINGTON POST
Randy Winstead lives in the land of the real. He's a botanist, with a scientist's respect for facts. He's a husband and father, 39 years old, who holds two steady hands on the wheel when he drives. He knows that the animal he saw in Shenandoah National Park not long ago has "the same air about it as the Loch Ness monster." But he is certain it was a beast that officially does not exist here: a cougar.
TRAVEL
June 3, 1990 | Christopher Kenneally
How to get there: Enter Shenandoah National Park from four places along Skyline Drive, which runs north-south from Front Royal, on Interstate 66 about 70 miles west of Washington, D.C., to Waynesboro, on I-64 about 25 miles west of Charlottesville, Va. Where to stay: Travelers on a budget can try the Tabard Inn, 1739 N St. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036, (202) 785-1277). Rates begin at $53 per night with a shared bath. Rooms with private bath start at $92. Prices include breakfast.
NEWS
November 5, 1989 | ALICE DIGILIO, THE WASHINGTON POST
As autumn spreads its colors across Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains, nearly a quarter-million visitors will flock to Skyline Drive in Shenandoah National Park to enjoy the views. Park officials and many conservationists suggest they take a good look and remember what they see, for the views are changing. The patchwork of fields and forests below the 50-year-old drive in many places is under siege from subdivisions, and a haze of air pollution on some days makes it hard to see anything at all.
NEWS
March 13, 1988 | GUY DARST, Associated Press
From gypsy moths in the Shenandoah to wild pigs in the Great Smokies to creeping kudzu in the West, an invasion of exotic animal and plant species is threating the nation's national parks. A draft summary of a major, just-completed National Park Service assessment of the condition of natural and cultural resources lists "encroachment by plants and animals not native to park environments" ahead of any other "major issues and threats" to natural resources.
OPINION
February 1, 2003
The prospect that campfire talks at Mesa Verde National Park or nature walks at Shenandoah National Park will be led not by rangers in Smokey Bear hats but by volunteers and that other jobs will be done by employees splattered with the logos of corporations has set park visitors to howling like frenzied coyotes. Interior Department officials insist that Secretary Gale A.
NEWS
December 21, 1987 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
It was one of the biggest Christmas gifts in the history of this nation. On Dec. 26, 1935, during the depths of the Great Depression, the people of Virginia presented Secretary of Interior Harold Ickes deeds to 176,429 acres of land for the establishment of Shenandoah National Park. Nine years earlier, Congress had approved legislation to create the 75-mile-long, half-mile-to-13-mile-wide, densely forested park--alive with wildlife--along the crest of the Blue Ridge Mountains.
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