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Shenyang

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WORLD
September 25, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - He was a poor man selling sausages and chicken from an unlicensed food cart in hope of earning enough money to send his talented young son to an art school in the capital. Outside a market in northeast China on a spring day, two municipal officers, members of a notoriously brutal force known as chengguan , confiscated Xia Junfeng's cooking equipment and took him in for questioning. Xia said it quickly turned into a beating. Soon, both officers were dead, stabbed with a small knife Xia kept in his pocket for slicing sausages.
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WORLD
September 25, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- Millions of Chinese took to the Internet to protest the execution of a 37-year-old vendor who had stabbed to death two municipal officials he said arrested and beat him for hawking meat skewers without a license. Xia Junfeng had argued that he was a poor, honest man who was only defending himself against the notoriously brutal urban management officers known in China as the chengguan -- and nearly 3 million Chinese agreed. As news of his execution by lethal injection was announced Wednesday, Chinese microblogs were flooded with outrage.
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WORLD
December 25, 2002 | Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer
Zhou Wei has the rare distinction of having been excommunicated by the Communist Party twice. The first time, he was a model cadre who became a target of Mao Tse-tung's 1957 "anti-rightist campaign," a ruthless crackdown on suspected counterrevolutionaries. Then only 26, Zhou suddenly found himself stripped of his party membership and banished to the countryside for more than two decades. His lot changed in 1979, when victims of the campaign were rehabilitated under Deng Xiaoping.
WORLD
September 25, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - He was a poor man selling sausages and chicken from an unlicensed food cart in hope of earning enough money to send his talented young son to an art school in the capital. Outside a market in northeast China on a spring day, two municipal officers, members of a notoriously brutal force known as chengguan , confiscated Xia Junfeng's cooking equipment and took him in for questioning. Xia said it quickly turned into a beating. Soon, both officers were dead, stabbed with a small knife Xia kept in his pocket for slicing sausages.
WORLD
September 25, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- Millions of Chinese took to the Internet to protest the execution of a 37-year-old vendor who had stabbed to death two municipal officials he said arrested and beat him for hawking meat skewers without a license. Xia Junfeng had argued that he was a poor, honest man who was only defending himself against the notoriously brutal urban management officers known in China as the chengguan -- and nearly 3 million Chinese agreed. As news of his execution by lethal injection was announced Wednesday, Chinese microblogs were flooded with outrage.
WORLD
August 19, 2010 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
A North Korean military aircraft crashed into a cornfield in northeastern China about 100 miles from the border, the Chinese government said Wednesday. Analysts believed the flight was a failed defection attempt. The pilot was killed in the crash Tuesday, according to China's official New China News Agency, which also reported that the government "is in communication on the matter with the North Korean side. " Chinese authorities released little information about the crash in Fushun prefecture, Liaoning province.
BOOKS
April 28, 2002 | DAVID SHEFF, David Sheff is the author of "China Dawn: The Story of a Technology and Business Revolution."
Edward Tian has been called China's Bill Gates, its Steve Jobs. One Chinese journal went so far as to call him "Bill Gates and Steve Jobs rolled into one." As co-founder of AsiaInfo, he helped build that nation's Internet. Then in 2000, he left AsiaInfo for a government-funded start-up called China Netcom. Its mission: to create a broad-band network that would connect China, from its teeming metropolises to its most remote villages, to the global Internet via the fastest network on the planet.
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
In celebration of Chinese New Year, the Hammer Museum    published Los Angeles Times restaurant critic Jonathan Gold 's picks for the best regional Chinese food in Los Angeles. It's your map to the San Gabriel Valley by regional cuisine. Beijing style: Beijing Pie House , 846 E. Garvey Ave., Monterey Park. Try the lamb pie and pan-fried meat cake. Chengdu style: Lucky Noodle King , 534 E. Valley Blvd., #10, San Gabriel, (626) 573-5668, www.luckynoodleking.com.
NEWS
October 11, 2001 | ANTHONY KUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a high-profile corruption case pointing to ties between local government leaders and organized crime, a Chinese court sentenced more than a dozen key officials in the country's fifth-largest city, state-run media reported today. Authorities sentenced Mu Suixin, the ex-mayor of Shenyang, to death with a two-year reprieve, a sentence that is usually commuted to life in prison.
NEWS
October 19, 1997 | ELAINE KURTENBACH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Smokestacks and factory compounds stretch from downtown to the smoggy horizon. Canals fouled by sewage encircle the city. Shenyang strains to cope with overcrowding, pollution and water shortages from rapid growth. And it's getting bigger. Twenty years ago, this industrial city had a population of less than 3 million. Today, it's 6.8 million. By 2025, Shenyang's residents are expected to number more than 10 million. It's a pattern being repeated throughout Asia.
WORLD
August 19, 2010 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
A North Korean military aircraft crashed into a cornfield in northeastern China about 100 miles from the border, the Chinese government said Wednesday. Analysts believed the flight was a failed defection attempt. The pilot was killed in the crash Tuesday, according to China's official New China News Agency, which also reported that the government "is in communication on the matter with the North Korean side. " Chinese authorities released little information about the crash in Fushun prefecture, Liaoning province.
WORLD
December 25, 2002 | Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer
Zhou Wei has the rare distinction of having been excommunicated by the Communist Party twice. The first time, he was a model cadre who became a target of Mao Tse-tung's 1957 "anti-rightist campaign," a ruthless crackdown on suspected counterrevolutionaries. Then only 26, Zhou suddenly found himself stripped of his party membership and banished to the countryside for more than two decades. His lot changed in 1979, when victims of the campaign were rehabilitated under Deng Xiaoping.
BOOKS
April 28, 2002 | DAVID SHEFF, David Sheff is the author of "China Dawn: The Story of a Technology and Business Revolution."
Edward Tian has been called China's Bill Gates, its Steve Jobs. One Chinese journal went so far as to call him "Bill Gates and Steve Jobs rolled into one." As co-founder of AsiaInfo, he helped build that nation's Internet. Then in 2000, he left AsiaInfo for a government-funded start-up called China Netcom. Its mission: to create a broad-band network that would connect China, from its teeming metropolises to its most remote villages, to the global Internet via the fastest network on the planet.
NEWS
October 11, 2001 | ANTHONY KUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a high-profile corruption case pointing to ties between local government leaders and organized crime, a Chinese court sentenced more than a dozen key officials in the country's fifth-largest city, state-run media reported today. Authorities sentenced Mu Suixin, the ex-mayor of Shenyang, to death with a two-year reprieve, a sentence that is usually commuted to life in prison.
NEWS
October 19, 1997 | ELAINE KURTENBACH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Smokestacks and factory compounds stretch from downtown to the smoggy horizon. Canals fouled by sewage encircle the city. Shenyang strains to cope with overcrowding, pollution and water shortages from rapid growth. And it's getting bigger. Twenty years ago, this industrial city had a population of less than 3 million. Today, it's 6.8 million. By 2025, Shenyang's residents are expected to number more than 10 million. It's a pattern being repeated throughout Asia.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
It's a worst-case scenario for most employees: There's someone in China who can do your job quickly, efficiently and for about one-fifth of your salary, and your boss absolutely loves his work.  But one U.S. software developer turned this nightmare on its head and actually benefited from outsourcing, a report says. That's because, unbeknownst to his bosses, he hired a Chinese developer to do his job, allowing him to take home impeccable performance reviews while actually spending the day watching cat videos and shopping on EBay.
NEWS
January 28, 1988
Chinese police have established that an American teacher found dead in her home in Shenyang was murdered with a sharp instrument. Other sources said that police in Shenyang, 350 miles northeast of Beijing, have no suspects in the death of Erin E. Johnston, 18, of Boone, N.C. She appeared to have been killed after a struggle, one Western source said.
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