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Shepard Fairey

ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2012 | By David Ng
The late Dee Dee Ramone will receive a posthumous gallery exhibition of his artwork thanks to street artist Shepard Fairey. The punk rock musician's paintings will be on display in a show at Fairey's Subliminal Projects gallery in Echo Park scheduled to run Oct. 26 through Nov. 17. "Dee Dee Ramone: A Memorial Exhibition" will mark the 10th anniversary of the musician's death. Ramone -- who was a founder of the New York punk band the Ramones -- was found dead in 2002 in his L.A. home, the victim of an apparent drug overdose.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Shepard Fairey's new piece of art could soon be driving by you on the L.A. streets. The Los Angeles Fund for Public Education on Tuesday unveiled its latest addition to its #ArtsMatter public art project, a bold graphic by Fairey that will be splashed across six city buses and hundreds of billboards for the next four weeks. Titled "Create Your Future," the piece is the third and final installment of L.A. Fund's campaign to spread the word about the importance of creativity in education.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
“Hey, that was my idea!” is a complaint that's so 2012. “It was my idea to steal that idea!” is more of the moment -- particularly if that moment is next Saturday. Josh Mintz, lead singer of the band Friend Slash Lover, will host an evening of art and music on June 29 -- called “It Was My Idea to Steal That Idea” -- at the massive, 6,000-square-foot “art lab” Nomad Art Compound. The event is also a release party for the indie rock band's new single, “Hellthy,” and one of the DJs is none other than street artist Shepard Fairey, who will be spinning under the name “DJ Diabetic.” “The whole show is based on these quickie phrases that have layers of meaning,” Mintz told Culture Monster.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2009 | Martha Groves
The red, white and blue "Hope" posters bearing the image of presidential candidate Barack Obama brought worldwide fame to the Los Angeles street artist who created them and arguably helped their subject win the White House. But Shepard Fairey, a guerrilla artist willing to go to jail for his distinctive graffiti, hasn't gone entirely mainstream.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
Street artists Shepard Fairey and RISK are at it again. For Art Basel Miami last year, the two painted a mural together, known as the “Peace & Justice Collaboration.” On Monday, they teamed up again for another Peace & Justice wall, this time on downtown L.A.'s skid row. The project is a two-mural set on the side of the Rossmore Hotel at East 6 th  Street and Ceres Avenue. It's a joint effort between LA Freewalls' Daniel Lahoda and the nonprofit Skid Row Housing Trust, which plan to put up as many as 30 murals in the area by a variety of artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2011
The Big Picture Artist, pop culture icon and Devo frontman Mark Mothersbaugh and acclaimed poster artist Shepard Fairey combine creative forces with a new two-man exhibit of their distinctive work. The exhibit, which benefits the Art of Elysium, a charity that supports gravely ill children, focuses on their work as artists and philanthropists. Subliminal Projects Gallery, 1331 W. Sunset Blvd., Echo Park. Opening reception Sat. 8-11 p.m. Show runs Tues.-Sat. thru Feb. 19. Free. (213)
OPINION
January 17, 2011
Most Americans are familiar with the ubiquitous poster by L.A.-based street artist Shepard Fairey of then-candidate Barack Obama looking off into the distance, pensive yet resolute, with the word "Hope" emblazoned across his chest. No image more clearly captured the excitement and expectations of that historic race. What Americans were not aware of when the posters were first plastered up across the country is that the image was drawn from an Associated Press photograph of Obama at a National Press Club event in 2006.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2010 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
Shepard Fairey enjoys reaching out to people whose work he admires. When he also forms a personal bond with the person he has approached, he says it feels like "things in the universe are in their correct place. " Which is why the rebellious street artist who skyrocketed to international fame in 2008 with his ubiquitous Obama "Hope" poster is particularly tickled about his budding friendship with actor/comedian/provocateur Russell Brand. Fairey traffics in the iconography of fame, and Brand, in his just-released memoir "Booky Wook 2," is obsessed with fame's machinations and implications.
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