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Sheremetyevo International Airport

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NEWS
January 24, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Domodedovo International Airport , the busiest of Moscow’s three airports, reopened to flights Monday afternoon after a powerful bomb blast killed 35 and wounded more than 130. Media reports say officials suspect the blast was the work of a suicide bomber. If you are traveling to Moscow in the next few days, check Domodedovo's arrivals and departures to see the status of flights. The list currently shows some cancellations, delays and changed gates for arrivals, but overall the airport appears to be handling flights well despite the tragedy.
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NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Former National Security Agency analyst Edward Snowden met in Moscow this week with four Americans who in some cases had acted as whistle-blowers during their own careers, the group told journalists Thursday. Former CIA analyst Ray McGovern, former NSA senior executive Thomas Andrews Drake , former FBI agent Coleen Rowley and Jesselyn Radack from the Government Accountability Project met with the fugitive American on Wednesday to give him the Sam Adams Award for Integrity in Intelligence, the English-language Russia Today news program reported.
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NATIONAL
August 5, 2013 | By David Horsey
Edward Snowden has escaped the limbo of the transit lounge at Moscow's Sheremetyevo International Airport and now, in the style of former Vice President Dick Cheney, the fugitive leaker is hunkered down in an undisclosed location somewhere in Russia. Snowden's father, Lon Snowden, has publicly thanked Russian President Vladimir Putin for keeping his son out of the clutches of American authorities who want to prosecute Snowden for revealing details of U.S. cyber spying operations.
WORLD
August 7, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
President Obama's decision to skip a one-on-one meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin while he is in Russia next month has been cast by some political commentators and the White House itself as censure of the Kremlin's grant of temporary asylum to fugitive espionage suspect Edward Snowden. Two prominent Russia analysts responded with gloomy accounts of the summit cancellation and its significance for the future of U.S.-Russia relations, but both argued that Snowden had little to do with it. The scrapped Putin-Obama meeting that was to have been on the eve of a Sept.
WORLD
July 27, 2013 | By Mery Mogollon and Chris Kraul
CARACAS, Venezuela -- Does Edward Snowden know what he'd be getting into if he ends up gaining asylum here? Many Venezuelans doubt it. The former National Security Agency contractor remains in Russia seeking at least temporary asylum. But leaders in Venezuela, Bolivia and Nicaragua have to varying degrees said they would be willing to take him in if he can work out a way to get to those countries. Venezuelans interviewed in recent days say they have more pressing concerns than taking in Snowden, who is wanted by the U.S. government on espionage charges for having leaked details of the government's efforts to monitor email and voice communications.
NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Former National Security Agency analyst Edward Snowden met in Moscow this week with four Americans who in some cases had acted as whistle-blowers during their own careers, the group told journalists Thursday. Former CIA analyst Ray McGovern, former NSA senior executive Thomas Andrews Drake , former FBI agent Coleen Rowley and Jesselyn Radack from the Government Accountability Project met with the fugitive American on Wednesday to give him the Sam Adams Award for Integrity in Intelligence, the English-language Russia Today news program reported.
WORLD
July 31, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Edward Snowden's father said he was grateful to Russian President Vladimir Putin and his government for their “courage” and “strength” in protecting his son, who is wanted for leaking top-secret U.S. security agency files. In an interview broadcast Wednesday in Russia with the Rossiya-24 television news network, Lon Snowden said his son is unlikely to get a fair trial in the United States, so Russia remains the safest place for him at the moment. “The fact is, no assurances have been made that he will be given a fair trial" in the United States, the elder Snowden said at the station's studios in Washington, where he was accompanied by a lawyer.
WORLD
August 7, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
President Obama's decision to skip a one-on-one meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin while he is in Russia next month has been cast by some political commentators and the White House itself as censure of the Kremlin's grant of temporary asylum to fugitive espionage suspect Edward Snowden. Two prominent Russia analysts responded with gloomy accounts of the summit cancellation and its significance for the future of U.S.-Russia relations, but both argued that Snowden had little to do with it. The scrapped Putin-Obama meeting that was to have been on the eve of a Sept.
WORLD
August 1, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams and Paul Richter
Russia's decision to grant temporary asylum to NSA leaker Edward Snowden is “insignificant” and won't negatively influence U.S.-Russian relations, an aide to President Vladimir Putin insisted shortly after the American fugitive was allowed to enter the country. The assurance of business as usual between the former superpowers that was blithely offered by Kremlin aide Yuri Ushakov seemed to suggest that some back-channel agreement was in place between Moscow and Washington to downplay Snowden's departure from Moscow's Sheremetyevo International Airport, where he had been trapped in a diplomatic limbo since June 23. But officials at the White House and State Department were reportedly angered by Moscow's sudden move to give shelter to Snowden.
WORLD
July 26, 2013 | By Marina Villeneuve and Carol J. Williams
WASHINGTON - In an effort to break the international standoff over fugitive Edward Snowden, the Obama administration has assured Russian authorities that the American on the lam after revealing top-secret U.S. intelligence operations won't face the death penalty or torture if he returns to the United States. Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. wrote to his Russian counterpart to say that Snowden's claim to need political asylum in Russia for fear of abuse or execution if returned to the United States was "entirely without merit," the Justice Department disclosed Friday.
NATIONAL
August 5, 2013 | By David Horsey
Edward Snowden has escaped the limbo of the transit lounge at Moscow's Sheremetyevo International Airport and now, in the style of former Vice President Dick Cheney, the fugitive leaker is hunkered down in an undisclosed location somewhere in Russia. Snowden's father, Lon Snowden, has publicly thanked Russian President Vladimir Putin for keeping his son out of the clutches of American authorities who want to prosecute Snowden for revealing details of U.S. cyber spying operations.
WORLD
August 1, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams and Paul Richter
Russia's decision to grant temporary asylum to NSA leaker Edward Snowden is “insignificant” and won't negatively influence U.S.-Russian relations, an aide to President Vladimir Putin insisted shortly after the American fugitive was allowed to enter the country. The assurance of business as usual between the former superpowers that was blithely offered by Kremlin aide Yuri Ushakov seemed to suggest that some back-channel agreement was in place between Moscow and Washington to downplay Snowden's departure from Moscow's Sheremetyevo International Airport, where he had been trapped in a diplomatic limbo since June 23. But officials at the White House and State Department were reportedly angered by Moscow's sudden move to give shelter to Snowden.
WORLD
July 31, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Edward Snowden's father said he was grateful to Russian President Vladimir Putin and his government for their “courage” and “strength” in protecting his son, who is wanted for leaking top-secret U.S. security agency files. In an interview broadcast Wednesday in Russia with the Rossiya-24 television news network, Lon Snowden said his son is unlikely to get a fair trial in the United States, so Russia remains the safest place for him at the moment. “The fact is, no assurances have been made that he will be given a fair trial" in the United States, the elder Snowden said at the station's studios in Washington, where he was accompanied by a lawyer.
WORLD
July 27, 2013 | By Mery Mogollon and Chris Kraul
CARACAS, Venezuela -- Does Edward Snowden know what he'd be getting into if he ends up gaining asylum here? Many Venezuelans doubt it. The former National Security Agency contractor remains in Russia seeking at least temporary asylum. But leaders in Venezuela, Bolivia and Nicaragua have to varying degrees said they would be willing to take him in if he can work out a way to get to those countries. Venezuelans interviewed in recent days say they have more pressing concerns than taking in Snowden, who is wanted by the U.S. government on espionage charges for having leaked details of the government's efforts to monitor email and voice communications.
WORLD
July 26, 2013 | By Marina Villeneuve and Carol J. Williams
WASHINGTON - In an effort to break the international standoff over fugitive Edward Snowden, the Obama administration has assured Russian authorities that the American on the lam after revealing top-secret U.S. intelligence operations won't face the death penalty or torture if he returns to the United States. Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. wrote to his Russian counterpart to say that Snowden's claim to need political asylum in Russia for fear of abuse or execution if returned to the United States was "entirely without merit," the Justice Department disclosed Friday.
NEWS
January 24, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Domodedovo International Airport , the busiest of Moscow’s three airports, reopened to flights Monday afternoon after a powerful bomb blast killed 35 and wounded more than 130. Media reports say officials suspect the blast was the work of a suicide bomber. If you are traveling to Moscow in the next few days, check Domodedovo's arrivals and departures to see the status of flights. The list currently shows some cancellations, delays and changed gates for arrivals, but overall the airport appears to be handling flights well despite the tragedy.
NEWS
December 25, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
An American telephone technician, charged with spying in Russia but allowed to go home for Christmas, arrived in Moscow on Wednesday and said he hopes to make it home to San Diego for Christmas dinner with his family. "It depends on whether we can get a plane down there in time," Bliss said upon his arrival at Moscow's Vnukovo airport from the southern town of Rostov-on-Don.
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