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Sheri Bodell

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November 6, 1997 | JOANNA DENDEL and MARY KAY STOLZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The designer: SHE is designed by Sheri Bodell, 31. Born in Salt Lake City, Sheri started her career there as a buyer at Nordstrom. Three years later, in 1989, the company promoted her and moved her to Los Angeles. The local history: "I grew up in Salt Lake City and there's not a lot to do for a living there. Let's face it, working for Nordstrom is glamorous in Utah. So I was learning the ropes as a buyer, learning about the customer and the product and learning how to merchandise."
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NEWS
December 4, 1997 | JOANNA DENDEL and MARY KAY STOLZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The designer: SHE is designed by Sheri Bodell, 31. Born in Salt Lake City, Sheri started her career there as a buyer at Nordstrom. Three years later, in 1989, the company promoted her and moved her to Los Angeles. The local history: "I grew up in Salt Lake City, and there's not a lot to do for a living there. Let's face it, working for Nordstrom is glamorous in Utah. So I was learning the ropes as a buyer, learning about the customer and the product and learning how to merchandise."
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NEWS
December 4, 1997 | JOANNA DENDEL and MARY KAY STOLZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The designer: SHE is designed by Sheri Bodell, 31. Born in Salt Lake City, Sheri started her career there as a buyer at Nordstrom. Three years later, in 1989, the company promoted her and moved her to Los Angeles. The local history: "I grew up in Salt Lake City, and there's not a lot to do for a living there. Let's face it, working for Nordstrom is glamorous in Utah. So I was learning the ropes as a buyer, learning about the customer and the product and learning how to merchandise."
NEWS
November 6, 1997 | JOANNA DENDEL and MARY KAY STOLZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The designer: SHE is designed by Sheri Bodell, 31. Born in Salt Lake City, Sheri started her career there as a buyer at Nordstrom. Three years later, in 1989, the company promoted her and moved her to Los Angeles. The local history: "I grew up in Salt Lake City and there's not a lot to do for a living there. Let's face it, working for Nordstrom is glamorous in Utah. So I was learning the ropes as a buyer, learning about the customer and the product and learning how to merchandise."
IMAGE
August 30, 2009 | Max Padilla
Men might find the trend for tailored dressing troubling: Though new suits can cost up to four digits, their wallets aren't getting fatter. Club Monaco is addressing this conundrum by launching a collection of trendily tailored mens suits that retail for less than $500 and transition easily from work to weekend, dressed up with a white shirt and tie or dressed down with Converse sneakers, a cardigan and jeans. "Although our suits are under $500, they have everything a high-end suit has," says Tim Farah, Club Monaco's vice president of men's design.
IMAGE
July 6, 2008 | Erin Weinger, Times Staff Writer
The Age of Aquarius is dawning again. Theory -- the buttoned-up clothing line known for simple suits, blouses and skirts seen in cubicles across America -- has launched a line of accessories in honor of "Hair," the revolutionary 1967 rock opera that celebrated free love and full-frontal nudity.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2006 | Booth Moore, Times Staff Writer
After miles of runway shows, the fall season ended Sunday. Fashion is clearly moving in a darker direction, and the season's strongest collections conveyed a thoughtfulness and melancholy that occasionally intensified into rage. Designers cut through the frills and got back to basics. That meant returning to fashion's original function, as protection, with cocooning layers at Marc Jacobs and primal fur pelt anoraks at Prada.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2005 | Booth Moore, Times Staff Writer
MERCEDES-BENZ Fashion Week ended here Sunday with another thud. Louis Verdad, one of the city's most promising talents, whose theatrical, 1940s-inspired suits have been worn by Madonna, Cate Blanchett and Britney Spears, attracted Vogue's Anna Wintour to her second L.A. show. And for the second time, the production and the clothes didn't measure up. Verdad is a great tailor, and with the focus on suits this season, the time has never been better for his designs.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2006 | Booth Moore, Times Staff Writer
There was so much to look at during Justin Timberlake's runway show you almost forgot it was about a denim line -- B-boys in sweater vests somersaulting over each other and cholo girls shaking their booties in short shorts, flirty farm girls in frilly dresses and Beverly Hillbillies in rockabilly pompadours.
MAGAZINE
August 15, 2004 | Peter McQuaid, Peter McQuaid last wrote for the magazine for the Men's Fashion Issue.
After a decade in which only the most stout of heart (or tone-deaf) would risk provoking a faux bloodbath by wearing an authentic fur, the fashion world--and the women who follow it--are in a fuzzy frenzy. Fur has returned--in giant slashes of cobalt blue and sea-green at Sonia Rykiel, in primly tailored jackets and stoles at Lanvin, in luxurious coats at Dolce & Gabbana, and in rock-star rags at Roberto Cavalli.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2005 | Booth Moore, Times Staff Writer
The silence backstage before the St. John show felt strange at Los Angeles Fashion Week, where the mood is usually light and the party hearty. But the stakes were high: the $400-million brand known for clothing Condoleezza Rice, Hillary Clinton and other political and business heavyweights, was about to join the world of actual fashion. The Irvine-based company announced in August plans to overhaul its image, starting by replacing the longtime creative director and face of the brand, Kelly Gray.
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