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Sheri Glaser

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1989 | RAY LOYND
Sheri Glaser, with her tinny voice and spindly frame, will never get by on appearance. But what an actress! Her art is the character monologue, and she reminds you of a young Lily Tomlin 20 years ago. Her "Sheri Glaser: Secrets of Life" is at the Rose Theater in Venice. Glaser, who is 29, co-wrote and co-directed the show's five monologues with husband Greg Howells.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1991 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Sheri Glaser got out of high school, she knew how to type. That, in her opinion, meant she could become a poet or--as a fallback--a secretary. "Which ought to tell you what I was like," said Glaser, recalling a mixed-up adolescence recently in her sparsely furnished Topanga Canyon shack. More than typing, however, a hidden talent for comic acting, which didn't surface until after Glaser was out of high school, has turned out to be her greatest asset.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1991 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Sheri Glaser got out of high school, she knew how to type. That, in her opinion, meant she could become a poet or--as a fallback--a secretary. "Which ought to tell you what I was like," said Glaser, recalling a mixed-up adolescence recently in her sparsely furnished Topanga Canyon shack. More than typing, however, a hidden talent for comic acting, which didn't surface until after Glaser was out of high school, has turned out to be her greatest asset.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1990 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five members of a middle-class Jewish family each get a chance to tell "Family Secrets" in Sheri Glaser's remarkable show of that name at the Heliotrope Theatre. The secrets are funny, sad and thoroughly detailed, if not always astonishing. But what lifts the show above the sometimes familiar material is that Glaser plays all five characters, in successive monologues.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1990 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five members of a middle-class Jewish family each get a chance to tell "Family Secrets" in Sheri Glaser's remarkable show of that name at the Heliotrope Theatre. The secrets are funny, sad and thoroughly detailed, if not always astonishing. But what lifts the show above the sometimes familiar material is that Glaser plays all five characters, in successive monologues.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1991 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you missed Sheri Glaser's "Family Secrets" when it blew into town late last year, you're in for a treat. If you saw it, see it again--while you can. There are some differences from last time: It's been trimmed and gussied up by director Art Wolff. But more important, Glaser's San Diego-nurtured career is more clearly than ever in the launch mode; this rocket may blast off at any moment.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1990 | NANCY CHURNIN
In a five-person family, there are always six points of view. One for each of the family members. The sixth for the sly writer who nails all those views down. Sheri Glaser, in her remarkable one-woman show, "Family Secrets," is the writer and performer who gets it all just right. The show, an independent production at the Hahn Cosmopolitan, has everything. It's funny, it's fast, it's smart and it has heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1986 | LIANNE STEVENS
Ever had your aura fluffed or your tofu scrambled? Do you whip out your wallet at the mention of a seminar on self-esteem, self-development, self-perception, self-deception or the search for Self? If so, you could be in real trouble. You may be inadvertently following "The Nickel-Weiner Roadmap to Enlightenment," the kind of spiritual trek that never gets past sweet smiles and pretense or locks you into a pattern of guilty meditations, afraid to admit you never achieved "it."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1992 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Memory Tricks," the San Diego premiere of Marga Gomez's monologue about her mother, an exotic Puerto Rican dancer, is a "Mommy Dearest" done with love. Although Gomez jokes about the vain, guilt-inducing and wildly eccentric mother who raised her, it is clear that she loves the woman, treasures the memories and clings to those rare fragments in time when her mother did, miraculously, say just the right thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1991 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Theatre Center won the most honors and small theaters also did well in the 1990 Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Awards announced Tuesday. LATC captured eight awards-- its most ever. The downtown theater, which is being purchased by the city of Los Angeles, had won three awards during each of the last four years. Six of LATC's awards this year were for "The Illusion," the most for any one production.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1989 | RAY LOYND
Sheri Glaser, with her tinny voice and spindly frame, will never get by on appearance. But what an actress! Her art is the character monologue, and she reminds you of a young Lily Tomlin 20 years ago. Her "Sheri Glaser: Secrets of Life" is at the Rose Theater in Venice. Glaser, who is 29, co-wrote and co-directed the show's five monologues with husband Greg Howells.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1991 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Theatre Center and the Center Theatre Group received the most nominations for the 22nd annual Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Awards for outstanding 1990 work, the critics' group announced Tuesday. The Los Angeles Theatre Center, with a total of 13 nominations for four shows, received the most for any one play: eight for "The Illusion." The Center Theatre Group, with 12 nominations for seven shows, shares a 13th nomination for the Mark Taper Forum/L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1990 | JANICE ARKATOV
Welcome to Sheri Glaser's family. There's Mort--he's the well-meaning dad. Bev's the Jewish mother; law school and lithium keep her steady since a nervous breakdown long ago. Rose is Bev's mother, falling in love at a seniors' residence. Granddaughter Fern--champion of the alternate lifestyle--is preparing for a home birth. Her younger sister, Sandra, lost her virginity last night and is waiting for him to call.
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