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Sheriff Brad Gates

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1989
I think it's time for the people of Orange County to wake up. Orange County Sheriff Brad Gates has finally had a verdict rendered against him for violating the civil rights of a political rival by using sheriff's investigators to harass him. It's unfortunate, however, that the blame lies on Brad, yet the burden once again will fall on county taxpayers. (In 1987 Orange County bailed Gates out in a related matter to the tune of $375,000.) What's even more distressing is the attitude of some prominent people around the community.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1998 | GREG HERNANDEZ
The husband of a woman who sued the Orange County Sheriff's Department, alleging sexual harassment, filed a lawsuit this week contending that Sheriff Brad Gates played a role in getting him fired from his job with a computer company. Carl Costello, a former investigator with the Sheriff's Department, blames Gates for his dismissal from Southland Micro Systems in Irvine.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1992 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling it a rejection of two local judges' views on drugs, Orange County Sheriff Brad Gates on Thursday released a poll showing that nearly 80% of county residents oppose legalizing drugs. Gates said the survey showed that Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray and U.S. Magistrate Ronald W. Rose are "out of step . . . with the community" in advocating the decriminalization of drug use. "The people of this community . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1997 | JEAN O. PASCO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sheriff Brad Gates said Tuesday that he won't be a candidate for reelection next year, despite the unexpected withdrawal last week of his chosen successor to the job he's held for 23 years. Much of the county's law enforcement community has been roiling since Assistant Sheriff Douglas D. Storm decided, after six weeks of campaigning, that the politics of running "just isn't for me."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1991 | LILY DIZON and MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two weeks before the final showdown for Measure J, Mothers Against Drunk Driving on Tuesday urged passage of the half-cent sales tax initiative for new criminal justice facilities on the May 14 ballot. Local environmental groups, meanwhile, were scheduled to discuss Tuesday night whether to enter the Measure J debate by stating which they would prefer in Gypsum Canyon: a 6,720-bed jail or an 8,000-home development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1989
Jeffrey Perlman's article (April 22) "Costly Preparations--Drug Money to Pave Way for President" indicates that Sheriff Brad Gates will spend in excess of $100,000 for a photo opportunity that could have been scheduled in many other Orange County locations instead of in a remote country area requiring extensive and expensive preparation for probably less than 10% of this cost. We are so underfunded in our efforts to reduce drug use that such a waste of money is unconscionable. And the Republicans call the Democrats spendthrifts!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1990
It seems that I rarely read good news about Sheriff Brad Gates. Now we learn that Orange County has just paid $475,000 in a settlement against him, bringing to more than $1 million the money we've paid to compensate victims of his illegal and unethical police activities. Do we have to wait until he has as many charges against him as Sen. (Joseph) Montoya (convicted recently of political corruption) before the people of this county wake up and elect a man that is an asset and not a liability?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1997 | JEAN O. PASCO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The announcement this week by Santa Ana Police Chief Paul M. Walters that he's likely to become a candidate for sheriff in 1998 raises the stakes for the already contentious race and all but assures a November runoff. Walters made the surprise decision to explore running a week after Sheriff Brad Gates announced he wouldn't seek reelection to his seventh term and endorsed Assistant Sheriff Douglas D. Storm. Walters was heading a steering committee for Orange County Marshal Michael S.
NEWS
October 17, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD and JEAN O. PASCO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sheriff Brad Gates, who has held public office longer than any other current Orange County official, announced Thursday that he would say goodbye to political office when his sixth term expires next year. But that didn't mean he was bowing out of politics. To the contrary, Gates made it clear that he will work aggressively to ensure that one of his top commanders, Assistant Sheriff Douglas D. Storm, is his successor.
NEWS
October 17, 1997
"A piece of my body and soul will always be in this department. This has been a very difficult decision for me and my family. You all know how much I love this job and love the County of Orange." --Sheriff Brad Gates * "Brad Gates is one of the most effective sheriffs in the state. The plummeting crime rate in Orange County is a testament to his effectiveness." --Gov. Pete Wilson * "My credentials are easily matched against Brad Gates, who we figured we'd be running against, and Doug Storm.
NEWS
October 16, 1997 | JEAN O. PASCO and SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sheriff Brad Gates, one of Orange County's most powerful and best-known political figures, has scheduled a news conference for this morning to announce he will not seek reelection to the office he has held since 1974, sources said. According to several sources, Gates will say he is bowing out as sheriff when his term expires next year and is throwing his support to Assistant Sheriff Doug Storm, a top lieutenant who heads the department's budget and special operations unit, to succeed him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1997
Re "Supervisor Wants Colleagues to Discipline County's CEO," Feb. 27: While Supervisor Todd Spitzer does what he was elected to do, Supervisors Jim Silva, Charles V. Smith and Thomas W. Wilson, as well as Sheriff Brad Gates, sit on their hands and whine about their exposure as do-nothings. Good job, Spitzer. WAYNE KING Orange Finally we have a man who has the integrity to challenge the board and the unfit and unqualified people who supervisors have chosen to run the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1996
Regarding the Board of Supervisors giving Sheriff Brad Gates a 9.1% salary raise, I have a suggestion. Instead of a raise, reduce his salary by 100% in order to recoup the money the wimpy supervisors paid out on the civil judgments rendered against Gates since he's held that office. Why wasn't that considered to be his personal ad infinitum raise until the voters got enough smarts to kick him out of office? NICK NOVICK Irvine Why should the people agree to a raise for the sheriff who was with California Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1991
I'd like to thank Sheriff Brad Gates for getting out front on the jail issue and urging the county supervisors to support a special election for a half-cent sales tax to build a new jail. Gates understands the problem of overcrowded jails in Orange County. He's the guy charged with managing the existing facilities that are filled beyond capacity. As the chief law enforcement officer of the county, it must keep him awake at night to think that dangerous criminals are being set free just because there is not ample space to keep them behind bars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1996
About your Nov. 20 editorial, "Only Law Enforcement Unity Can Meet Gang's Threat": More than four years ago, the Orange County Chiefs' and Sheriff's Assn. established the County-Wide Gang Strategy Steering Committee to inform and coordinate anti-gang activities throughout Orange County. All 22 law enforcement agencies in Orange County participate in this cooperative effort. The members of the steering committee include chiefs of police James Cook (Westminster), Randy Gaston (Anaheim)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Board of Supervisors will decide next week whether to grant Sheriff Brad Gates a 9.1% raise that would boost his base salary to $126,200 a year. Board Chairman Roger R. Stanton proposed the salary increase, which he described as long overdue, given the sheriff's "considerable contributions to the County of Orange and as a key member of the county's management team." Gates' salary is now $115,000--several thousand dollars less than the base pay earned by Dist. Atty. Michael R.
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