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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1985
In the Feb. 27 edition of The Times, Orange County Sheriff Brad Gates is quoted, charging that the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is a "criminal lobby." With respect to ACLU, Sheriff Gates offers mere nonsense, but with respect to the system of justice he serves, Sheriff Gates espouses an exceptionally unsettling idea. ACLU is not a "criminal lobby" any more than we are a "lobby" for ministers or mothers or the homeless or girls who want to play third base in Little League.
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NEWS
January 1, 1999 | NANCY WRIDE and JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He's been one tough hombre and the most powerful Orange County politician in a generation. Charmer, tyrant, cowboy at heart. Orange County Sheriff-Coroner Brad Gates has worn many labels in 24 years as he led the county's largest police agency from Mayberry to state of the art. Through triumph and scandal and showdowns with bureaucrats, the county's top lawman almost always emerged riding high in the saddle.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1990
Re Brad Gates verdict: There shouldn't be any fuss about Brad Gates having to pay damages out of his own pocket. Those who have supported him all these years will take up a collection for him. Hey, they can sell their guns. But of a more serious note, perhaps it is time for Sheriff Gates to resign, to take the honorable course of action instead of relying upon his well-entrenched constituency to promote his "I was just doing what was best for Orange County" routine, and vilify the verdict (see Supervisor Roger R. Stanton)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1997
When one of the TV networks wanted to portray Orange County's controversy over a proposed tax to help the county recover from bankruptcy, it featured two things: sunny coastal scenes of an affluent area and Sheriff Brad Gates. In the county, there is no leading mayor, no high-profile county executive, no dominant member of the Board of Supervisors.
NEWS
February 22, 1989 | DAVE LESHER, Times Staff Writer
Orange County Sheriff-Coroner Brad Gates--stung by criticism that lax administration led to a jail breakout last fall and by a jury's ruling that a convicted murderer fled the jail because he was being beaten--defended his embattled department Tuesday. The two disclosures last week caused "a bad impact on me and the department," Gates acknowledged.
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | STEVE EMMONS, Times Staff Writer
A federal jury rebuked Orange County Sheriff Brad Gates with a $189,894 judgment Wednesday, awarding the money to a political rival who said Gates had violated his civil rights by using sheriff's investigators to harass him. It was the first time a jury had a say in the decade-long controversy over whether Gates has misused his police powers. In 1987, Orange County settled a related federal suit against Gates for $375,000 but denied that Gates had done anything wrong.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1990
I recently had the privilege of attending the anti-drug rally held in Santa Ana where President Bush was a guest speaker. My 15-year-old son also attended. I couldn't think of a better lesson he could learn than hearing firsthand the President of the United States, as well as some of his other heroes, Chuck Norris, Jim Everett and others, saying: "We support Sheriff (Brad) Gates' programs on making Orange County drug-free." Chuck Norris had to be so proud of his own son, Chris, for being able to speak publicly of his own past drug problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1991
Please inform Sheriff Gates and the supervisors that this voter was not confused about what she would get if the measure passed--and yes, indeed, it was a vote against a jail in Gypsum Canyon. If plans had been to build a jail in central Santa Ana where it belongs, I might have considered biting the tax bullet. Leave the canyons alone! KATHRYN REEVES, Fullerton
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1989
Regarding "Politicians See Little Damage to Sheriff Gates" (Part I, Orange County edition, March 16): The problem with the politicians is that they have tunnel vision. Gates is unethical in carrying out the duties of a law enforcement official. The politicians are patting him on the back instead of ostracizing him. After all, what is a million dollars of taxpayers' money. Money is no criterion --the county has plenty. A similar incident--the Fuentes fiasco --was unethical, and illegal--but the politicians told Tom: "Good Work, Tom!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1994
Prior to retiring as a Parks and Recreations administrator for Los Angeles County, I was an active member of the Los Angeles County Interagency Gang Task Force. Membership in the task force consisted of many jurisdictions, including representatives from the Probation Department, district attorney's office, Los Angeles Sheriff's Department, Los Angeles Police Department, Parks and Recreation, school districts, Youth Gang Services, Board of Supervisors, city councils and various other community-based agencies and organizations.
NEWS
October 16, 1997 | JEAN O. PASCO and SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sheriff Brad Gates, one of Orange County's most powerful and best-known political figures, has scheduled a news conference for this morning to announce he will not seek reelection to the office he has held since 1974, sources said. According to several sources, Gates will say he is bowing out as sheriff when his term expires next year and is throwing his support to Assistant Sheriff Doug Storm, a top lieutenant who heads the department's budget and special operations unit, to succeed him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Board of Supervisors will decide next week whether to grant Sheriff Brad Gates a 9.1% raise that would boost his base salary to $126,200 a year. Board Chairman Roger R. Stanton proposed the salary increase, which he described as long overdue, given the sheriff's "considerable contributions to the County of Orange and as a key member of the county's management team." Gates' salary is now $115,000--several thousand dollars less than the base pay earned by Dist. Atty. Michael R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1996 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County Marshal Michael S. Carona is challenging Sheriff Brad Gates to a political shootout over the county's distribution of millions of dollars in tax funds earmarked for law enforcement. Carona, who generally keeps a low profile, is asking the county to give his agency $2.2 million of the more than $149 million expected to be channeled into the county next year under Proposition 172, a sales tax that raises money for law enforcement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1994
In reference to the recent articles (Dec. 29 and Dec. 30) about Orange County Sheriff's Deputy Brian Scanlan, I was disheartened to read that The Times had resorted to a tabloid-like character crucifixion of this deputy. For whatever reason, The Times felt the need to attack Scanlan's character by disclosing that he had failed to meet past child-care payments and had an outstanding equipment violation ticket. The Times also discussed pending litigation involving Scanlan as well.
NEWS
January 5, 1994 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County Sheriff Brad Gates, breaking his virtual silence on the Christmas Day shooting death of a veteran deputy, acknowledged for the first time Tuesday that internal policies were broken during an impromptu training session that led to the fatality. Gates also vowed that once a criminal inquiry into the shooting is completed, sheriff's officials would review training procedures, which have come under attack from some community leaders in the wake of Deputy Darryn Leroy Robins' death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1994
Prior to retiring as a Parks and Recreations administrator for Los Angeles County, I was an active member of the Los Angeles County Interagency Gang Task Force. Membership in the task force consisted of many jurisdictions, including representatives from the Probation Department, district attorney's office, Los Angeles Sheriff's Department, Los Angeles Police Department, Parks and Recreation, school districts, Youth Gang Services, Board of Supervisors, city councils and various other community-based agencies and organizations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1987 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge in Los Angeles on Monday tentatively sided against efforts by Orange County lawyers to keep former Municipal Court Judge Bobby D. Youngblood's lawsuit against Sheriff-Coroner Brad Gates from going to trial. Youngblood's four-year-old lawsuit, in which he claims that Gates used improper surveillance and harassment tactics against him for political purposes, is scheduled to begin trial on April 14. On Monday, county lawyers asked U.S. District Judge John G.
NEWS
October 23, 1993 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County Sheriff Brad Gates has urged county officials to consider awarding an $80-million law enforcement communications contract to a company that employed the sheriff's political ally and friend Gary Hausdorfer on the project, according to a top county official. R.A. Scott, director of the county's General Services Agency, said Gates talked to him at least three times about giving the Harris Corp.--the low bidder--a "fair shot" at one of the biggest contracts in recent county history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1993 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a ruling seen as total victory for Orange County, and which may clear the way for further expansion of the Theo Lacy Branch Jail, a judge found that Sheriff Brad Gates never housed maximum-security inmates there. A lawsuit brought by the city of Orange alleged that the sheriff had secretly housed dangerous inmates at the branch jail in Orange, a violation of earlier agreements between the county and city.
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